Alignment: Overall Summary

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The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the expectations of alignment. Texts are of high quality. The materials provide opportunities for student growth in reading, writing, speaking and listening, and developing language skills over the course of the year. The materials also meet the overall expectations for instructional supports and usability, with guidance for implementation.

See Rating Scale Understanding Gateways

Alignment

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Meets Expectations

Gateway 1:

Text Quality

0
27
52
58
57
52-58
Meets Expectations
28-51
Partially Meets Expectations
0-27
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Building Knowledge

0
15
28
32
28
28-32
Meets Expectations
16-27
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

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Meets Expectations

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
23
30
34
30
30-34
Meets Expectations
24-29
Partially Meets Expectations
0-23
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Text Quality & Complexity and Alignment to Standards Components

Meets Expectations

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-
Gateway One Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the expectations for high-quality texts are the central focus of lessons, are at the appropriate grade-level text complexity, and are accompanied by quality tasks aligned to the standards of reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language in service to grow literacy skills. Texts are worthy of students’ time and attention, are of quality, rigorous, and at the right text complexity criteria for grade level, student, and task. The materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts; however, materials do not provide students with opportunities to learn opinion writing. Each Unit includes the same opinion writing folder with five lessons for opinion writing, but no guidance is included on when or how to use the lessons. Additionally, the folder is not directly connected to the core materials and may be overlooked.

Materials in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language targeted to support foundational reading development are present; however, instructional timing is limited to 15 minutes daily, which is not sufficient for students to master grade-level foundational skills.

Criterion 1a - 1f

Texts are worthy of students' time and attention: texts are of quality and are rigorous, meeting the text complexity criteria for each grade. Materials support students' advancing toward independent reading.
20/20
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-
Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criterion for texts are worthy of students’ time and attention, are of quality and are rigorous, meeting the text complexity criteria for each grade. Materials support students’ advancing toward independent reading.  Anchor texts, including read-aloud texts, are of publishable quality, worthy of careful reading, and consider a range of student interests, and the materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level. Texts, including read-aloud texts and some shared reading texts used to build knowledge and vocabulary, have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and relationship to their associated student task. Read-aloud texts are above the complexity levels of what most students can read independently. The materials support students’ literacy skills (comprehension) over the course of the school year through increasingly complex text to develop independence of grade-level skills. Anchor texts, including read-aloud texts, and the series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for purpose and placement in the grade level and support materials for the core texts provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to support their reading at grade level by the end of the school year.

Indicator 1a

Anchor texts (including read-aloud texts in K-2 and shared reading texts in Grade 2 used to build knowledge and vocabulary) are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading/listening and consider a range of student interests.
4/4
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria for anchor texts (including read aloud texts in K-2 and shared reading texts in Grade 2 used to build knowledge and vocabulary) are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading/listening and consider a range of student interests.

The anchor texts in the units and across the yearlong curriculum are high-quality, rich in content, and include science and social studies topics. The anchor texts are of publishable quality, worthy of careful reading, well-crafted, content-rich, and include a range of student interest. 

Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 2, Week 5, students listen to Amazing Migrations: Butterflies, Bats, and Birds by Cheryl Willis Hudson. The text has an overall description text structure, but within each section, the text is often organized sequentially to describe and give details about seasonal migration patterns. Maps enhance readers’ understanding of content and are integral to understanding. Text features such as glossary and headings help readers learn science concepts and domain-specific terms. 
  • In Unit 4, Week 2, students listen to Building on Nature: The Life of Antoni Gaudi by Rachel Rodriguez. Language is complex and contains many examples of abstract and figurative language. The tone is whimsical, and descriptive sentences, such as "Mountain peaks jag against the sky," provide interest but may prove challenging. Vocabulary may be unfamiliar, such as metalsmiths, monastery, and ruins.
  • In Unit 5, Week 1, students listen to Introducing Landforms by Bobbie Kalman and Kelley MacAulay. The informational text contains vibrant photographs of nature which include captions and labels to help guide student understanding. The text features strong content vocabulary about land forms. It is written in a descriptive text structure which include headings and bold print.
  • In Unit 5, Week, 5, students listen to Rocks! by Christopher Cheng. The text includes a lot of discipline-specific content knowledge. Students will require background knowledge of the study of rock and other unfamiliar concepts—geology, biology, history (ancient Egypt), and modern architecture. Students will also need support with vocabulary (minerals, igneous, sedimentary, magma).

Indicator 1b

Materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria for materials reflecting the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.

The materials, including shared reading texts, leveled readers, and trade books, contain a variety of topics and are balanced between literary and informational texts throughout each unit. The materials include informational text, infographics, poetry, drama, realistic fiction, fables, legends, folktales, biographies, persuasive text, and procedural text. 

Examples of literary texts include:

  • Unit 1, Week 5: You Can’t Climb a Cactus by Derrick Barnes
  • Unit 3, Week 2: The Legend of the Lady Slipper by Lise Lunge-Larsen & Margi Preus
  • Unit 3, Leveled Reader: Three Wishes by David Booth
  • Unit 4, Week 4: One Plastic Bag by Miranda Paul
  • Unit 4, Leveled Reader: Dear Diary by Dona Foucault

Examples of informational texts include:

  • Unit 1, Leveled Reader: Notes from Antarctica by Mariel Early
  • Unit 1, Leveled Reader: Landmarks of the United States by Gwen McCutcheon
  • Unit 2, Week 5: Amazing Migrations by Cheryl Willis Hudson
  • Unit 3, Week 4: The Abenaki by Joseph Bruchac
  • Unit 3, Trade Book: Celebrating the New Year by Traci Sorell
  • Unit 5, Week 2: excerpts from How Water Shapes the Earth by Jared Siemens and How Earthquakes Shape the Earth by Aaron Carr and Megan Cuthbert
  • Unit 5, Leveled Reader: Glaciers by Mariel Early

Indicator 1c

Texts (including read-aloud texts and some shared reading texts used to build knowledge and vocabulary) have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade level according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and a relationship to their associated student task. Read-aloud texts at K-2 are above the complexity levels of what most students can read independently.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria for texts (including read-aloud texts and some shared reading texts used to build knowledge and vocabulary) have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade level according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and a relationship to their associated student task. Read-aloud texts at K-2 are above the complexity levels of what most students can read independently. 

Texts have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to qualitative analysis, quantitative analysis, and relationship to the associated student task. Anchor texts and shared reading texts are placed at the appropriate grade level according to the quantitative and qualitative analysis. The text complexity chart provides examples of places where students may need support through the qualitative measure. The leveled research articles from each unit during Week 6 have a Lexile range to support a variety of learning levels. Most of the shared reading texts are within the range of the Grade 2 Lexile band. Texts that are above or below grade level quantitative bands have qualitative features and/or tasks that bring the text to the appropriate level for students to access the text. The majority of texts gradually build in difficulty throughout the school year. The Lexile ratings of the shared reading text begin at 530L and end the year at 710L.

Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • How Many Stars in the Sky?, 530L: In the Unit 1, Week 1, this shared reading text contains longer sentences with the average length of 9.0 words. The Qualitative analysis suggests students may need additional help with Language, Descriptive language, and Knowledge Demands:  Science knowledge of the stars and the sun. This informational text is very complex with the Levels of Meaning. There is a family theme and a scientific concept of the sun and the stars. Students may miss the implied family themes. 
  • You Can’t Climb a Cactus, 530L: This anchor text for Unit 1, Week 5, includes the theme of having a good time despite one’s initial reluctance to try something new. The theme is easily discerned from the main character’s change of heart; a related theme that learning new information can be fun is developed through the high-interest animal and plant life in the Arizona desert. The story includes experiences common to most readers, such as going on a plane/vacation, visiting a museum or nature center, and participating reluctantly in a family event.
  • A Home on the Prairie, 730L: This shared reading text for Unit 2, Week 2, includes the Qualitative Measures that suggest that students might need additional support with Language: Author’s use of pronouns and Knowledge Demands: Accessing prior knowledge of prairies.  The sentences are simple, and the vocabulary is mostly familiar and conversational in tone. The subject matter includes some discipline-specific content knowledge that students may find unfamiliar. New words and concepts are defined in the text and in the glossary, and content is presented in very simple terms.
  • A Green Kids Guide to Watering Plants, 510L: This anchor text for Unit 2, Week 5, includes an author’s purpose that is implied but easy to identify; the title refers to being “green” and the author states, "Now, it is time to plant and water your fruits and vegetables!" Students can easily infer that the author’s purpose is to explain how to plant and water a garden in a “green” way. Each section of the text has a main idea related to how to be a green gardener. The text also has elements of sequential text structure that follows steps in planting and watering a garden and in related processes. The illustrations and headings enhance understanding of the content and connect ideas. Subject matter includes some common, practical knowledge and some discipline-specific content knowledge.
  • The Abenaki, 580L: This story anchor text for Unit 3, Week 5, includes sentences that are mostly simple, but at times the text includes academic vocabulary (effective, culture, society, and traditional). Most domain-specific terms, such as "wigwam," are defined in the text or can be understood from context. Students who are not familiar with the traditions of Native American tribes may find the text challenging. Some students may need support connecting traditions of the Abenaki from long ago (wigwams, using natural resources) to the traditions they have today (powwows, traditional clothing). 
  • Excerpt from How Water Shapes the Earth by Jared Siemens, 710L: In Unit 5, Week 2, this informational text is a shared read. The Quantitative Measures place this text in the Grade 2–3 complexity band. The Qualitative Measures suggest that students might need additional support with Language: Terms for features of Earth’s surface and Knowledge Demands: How water changes Earth by wearing away and building up the land. The language is literal, straightforward, and easy to understand, and sentences are mainly simple. The vocabulary is familiar, conversational, and contemporary. Students may need support in understanding the terms for the land forms and bodies of water mentioned in the text (cliff, coastline, valley, canyon, river, waterfall). Knowledge Demands:  Subject matter relies on common practical knowledge and some discipline-specific content knowledge of land forms and features of Earth’s surface. Students may also find it useful to understand the processes (erosion, weathering) that shape the land. 
  • Introducing Landforms, 520L: This anchor text for Unit 5, Week 5 contains sentences that are mostly simple in construction, and the language is mostly straightforward. There is a high density of domain-specific terms, and although these are often defined in the text, the number of new terms may be challenging for students. The text relies on common practical knowledge and some discipline- specific content knowledge. Students may need support connecting familiar land forms they know from their own experience to those that are unfamiliar.

Indicator 1d

Materials support students' literacy skills (comprehension) over the course of the school year through increasingly complex text to develop independence of grade level skills (leveled readers and series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels).
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria for materials supporting students’ literacy skills (comprehension) over the course of the school year through increasingly complex text to develop independence of grade level skills (leveled readers and series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels). 

The materials contain the complexity of anchor texts and supporting texts to provide students with the opportunity to grow their comprehension skills throughout the school year. Series of texts are at a variety of complexity levels appropriate for the grade band. Skills build on one another, as well as the complexity of the texts to support the thinking and literacy skills. The Teacher's Edition provides appropriate scaffolds to support both the teacher and the students. The Shared Reading texts include a variety of complexity levels to help grow students’ literacy skills throughout the year.

Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In the beginning of the year, students summarize with partners after the Shared Read in Unit 1, Week 4, Lesson 2. After the first read, “In pairs have students choral-read the poem aloud...after partners reread the poem, have them summarize the events and ideas in the poem to each other.” In Unit 2, Week 5, Lesson 4, during the Close Read in Reading Workshop, students summarize the key ideas they learned from the headings. 
  • By the middle of the year, students summarize as they read to help independently comprehend and retell the story. In Unit 3, Week 4, Lesson 2, during the Shared Reading of Reading Workshop, the teacher models during the think aloud: “My purpose for reading is to learn more about the Abenaki. After I read each page, I try to summarize or retell, what I learned. On this page, I learned that Abenaki means ‘Dawn Land Place.’ They have that name because they live in the east. I also learned that the Abenaki language is called Algonquin.”

Examples of how students use details to help determine the main idea of their reading include, but are not limited to:

  • In the beginning of the year, the students learn how to use details to help determine the main idea. In Unit 1, Week 3, Lesson 1, Reading Workshop, Listening Comprehension, students listen to the read aloud of “Helping the Community” and listen for key details. The teacher rereads the text and uses a think aloud to model finding details and the main idea.
  • In the middle of the year,  students use details to help determine the main idea. In Unit 3, Week 4, Lesson, Reading Workshop, Leveled Readers, students read the informational text, Game On! Students use details from the story to determine the main idea. The teacher prompts, "What main idea can we take away? What more can you say about this idea and provides scaffolding, if needed."
  • By the end of the year, students need to make inferences to find the main idea. In Unit 5, Week 5, Lesson 3, Reading Workshop, Close Read, after reading Rocks!, students make inferences from the text to determine the main idea. Using the Student Interactive, students underline the text evidence that helps them determine the main idea of the selection.

Indicator 1e

Anchor texts (including read-aloud texts in K-2) and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis.
2/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that anchor texts (including read-aloud texts in K-2) and the series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis.

Each unit contains a shared reading text which is accompanied by quantitative and qualitative analysis, as well as Reader and Task considerations. The publisher provides a text complexity analysis located in the Text Complexity Analysis Charts section of the instructional materials. In addition, there are additional considerations for English Language Learners, Intervention, On Level, and Advanced students. The Book Club guided reading books are also leveled to assist teachers in matching students to texts. The publisher provides information for the text rationale and placement in the Getting Started with myView Literacy page under Program Overview.  “Texts were chosen based on criteria such as literary merit, author’s craft, themes, gender and cultural representations/experiences, insight, readability and diversity. Final text selections for inclusion in myView Literacy were subject to numerous professional reviews to confirm the literature meets Pearson’s requirements for quality, appropriateness, and sensitivity. In developing myView Literacy, we worked to integrate multicultural experiences so students see themselves as part of what is valued in the school curriculum.” 

Examples of instructional and text notes include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Week 1, students read How Many Stars in the Sky? by Lenny Hort; Genre: Realistic Fiction; 530L. The Quantitative Measures place this text in the Grade 2–3 complexity band. The Qualitative Measures suggest that students might need additional support with Language: Descriptive language and Knowledge Demands: Stars and the sun; why we see stars only at night.
    "Before reading the selection, use the Reader and Task Considerations to help you plan how to address various student populations." The text’s multiple levels of meaning are subtle and difficult to separate; the constancy of family is echoed and reinforced by the idea that the stars are in the sky even when they aren't seen. Students may focus on scientific ideas and miss the implied family themes. The first-person narrative is chronological; though it moves through three different settings, it is easy to follow. The illustrations directly support an understanding of the text by showing characters, settings, and events in the story. The language is largely explicit and easy to understand, and the vocabulary is mostly conversational; however, students may need support with informal and idiomatic language (I bet she’d know) as well as unusual verbs in descriptive language (Powerful searchlights beamed from the roofs of the skyscrapers). The story includes themes of varying levels of complexity as it engages both science concepts and family relationships. There are no references to other texts, but students will find some background knowledge about stars helpful. Elements of setting (department stores) may be unfamiliar.
  • In Unit 3, Week 3, students read Cendrillon: An Island Cinderella, by Tracey Baptist; Genre: Folktale; 570L. The Quantitative Measures place this text in the Grade 2–3 complexity band. The Qualitative Measures suggest that students might need additional support with Language: Pronouns with confusing antecedents and Knowledge Demands: Plot of traditional Cinderella story. "Before reading the selection, use the Reader and Task Considerations to help you plan how to address various student populations." This variation on the classic rags-to-riches Cinderella story contains many of the same intertwined themes, including the importance of the virtues of goodness, kindness, and forgiveness and the idea that greed and ambition will not be rewarded. The third-person narrative is chronological and relatively simple, with recognizable elements of fairy tales and a number of time-order words to help readers track the sequence. Students may need support inferring events in the narrative that are not stated directly: "There was a shipwreck, and Papa did not return." The sentences are mostly simple and compound, but there are some complex constructions. The vocabulary is mostly familiar and conversational. Students may need help identifying antecedents for pronouns when there is more than one option: "She made her scrub pots and sweep the floor." The story includes themes of varying levels of complexity and the experiences portrayed are uncommon to readers. Familiarity with the fairy tale Cinderella is important for students to understand the reference and parallels.
  • In Unit 5, Week 4, students read “Volcano Wakes Up!” by Lisa Westberg Peters; Genre: Poetry. The Quantitative Measures are not generated for poetry and drama. The Qualitative Measures suggest that students might need additional support with Meaning: Connecting different poems to a common topic or theme and Structure: Determining the speaker of each poem. "Before reading the selection, use the Reader and Task Considerations to help you plan how to address various student populations." The collection of poems includes speakers with various points of view, connected by one event—a volcanic eruption. There are multiple levels of meaning that are difficult to separate and interpret. Finding a cohesive theme depends on the multitude of voices all adding their own perspective on the event. The collection presents poems from several points of view. Some points of view are repeated, while others are not. Each speaker has a different personality and style, and each poem makes use of different poetic devices. Students will need to consider the structure of each poem apart from the structure of the overall narrative, which is chronological. The language used varies from poem to poem but is overall dense and complex. Figurative language is used frequently, and unusual juxtapositions— particularly when street sign language is used to create lines of poetry—add complexity. Vocabulary includes some informal language and spelling: "I M at the AllUCanEat, AllNt, HotLavaBBQ!". Poems include themes of varying levels of complexity. The experience of being near a volcano is likely to be uncommon to most readers. Students may benefit from prior knowledge of volcanic activity and eruptions.

Indicator 1f

Anchor text(s), including support materials, provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that support materials for the core text(s) provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to support their reading at grade level by the end of the school year. 

The materials include several opportunities for students to engage in diverse literature and informational text in a day, week, and unit. Throughout the Reading Workshop, Reading-Writing Bridge, Writing Workshop in each week and the Project-Based Inquiry in each unit, students are exposed to text in the form of Read Aloud, Shared Reading, Close Reads, Mentor Stacks, Guided Reading, and Independent Reading. Reading Workshop each week includes the following: Read Aloud, Shared Read, Close Read, Compare texts.

Texts cover a variety of genres, complexity levels, and opportunities for students to work with diverse texts. Students also have the opportunity to engage with texts through small group guided reading. A Leveled Readers library available in print and online is also diverse in genre and complexity. Teaching support is provided in a separate guide that addresses each component to the guided reading with differentiation ideas and targeted support for ELLs, conversation prompts, and Guided Writing. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Week 4, students listen to a poetry called "A Traveling Alphabet". Next, using the Student Interactive, students read together a compilation of poems in the same genre called Poetry, containing poems such as "Pete at the Zoo," "Keziah," "Rudolph is Tired of the City," and "Lyle". Students Close Read the same text days later with support questions in the Student Interactive. Teachers then have 18 options ranging from Guided Reading Level H to Level M for small group texts. A Matching Texts to Learning resource is offered to teachers who choose to select other texts that match the instructional focus to provide additional texts that fit the weekly theme. 
  • In Unit 4, Week 3, students work on realistic fiction in the Reading Workshop with the read aloud, Making a Difference in Your Community. The leveled readers are realistic fiction (How Loose is Your Tooth, Celebrating Eid, Sam’s Stones, Milo’s Basketball, and Grandpa Don’s New Home) and fantasy (Freddy Forget-Me-Not Loses His Laugh).
  • In Unit 5, Week 2, students work with the nonfiction genre in the Reading Workshop. Students launch the week with an infographic, “The Grand Canyon.” The Read Aloud consists of two informational texts, Volcanos and Shifting Plates. The Shared Read is another nonfiction text, How Water Shapes the Earth and How Earthquakes Shape the Earth. 
  • In Unit 5, Week 3, students begin the weekly launch with the infographic, “Lightning!”. This is a short, informational text. Next, the Read Aloud, “Preparing for the Storm,” is a drama. The Shared Read, When the Rain Falls, is also a drama. Students revisit this text for a close reading on Days 3 and 4.

Criterion 1g - 1n

Materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills.
15/16
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criterion for materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills. Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-based, requiring students to engage with the text directly, drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text. Sets of high-quality sequences of text-based questions with activities that build to a culminating task. The materials provide frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions in a variety of groupings that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax, while also supporting students’ listening and speaking about what they are reading or read aloud and researching (shared projects) with relevant follow-up questions and supports. The materials include a mix of on-demand and process, grade-appropriate writing (e.g., grade-appropriate  revision and editing) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate. The materials provide opportunities for students to address different text types of writing; however, opportunities are missed for students to learn opinion writing.

The materials also include explicit instruction of the grade-level grammar and conventions standards as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.

Indicator 1g

Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-based, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-based, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).

The materials contain text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language, key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts in order to make meaning and build understanding of texts and topics. Students are asked to analyze the author’s words and phrases as they interact with texts through questioning or by completing different tasks. The sequence of questions and tasks provide frequent opportunities for students to interact with texts, by completing a Shared Read on Day 2 and a Close Read on Days 3 and 4 of the weekly cycle. Text-based questions, tasks, and assignments support students’ literacy growth over the course of the school year. The Teacher Materials provide support for planning and implementation of text-dependent writing, speaking, and activities. 

Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Week 2, Lesson 2, Reading Workshop, Close Read, students answer, “Why does the music stop? Why does Mira put her brush down?” 
  • Unit 1, Week 3, Lesson 2, Reading Workshop, Shared Read: After a shared reading of “What Is a Community,” students “identify the main idea. Underline the words that tell you the main idea of this section.” Another student task is to “highlight words to tell why the library is a popular place in communities.” Both of these activities require that students engage directly with the text.
  • In Unit 3, Week 2, Lesson 2, Reading Workshop, Shared Read: After the Shared Read The Legend of the Lady Slipper, students “underline the words the author uses to show the girl is a hero to the people in the village.” Later in the text, students answer, “How does the girl figure out how to get out of the snow? Who or what helps her?” and “underline the text that shows who gave the girl advice.”
  • In Unit 3, Week 3, Reading Workshop Small Groups, the guided reading prompts include: “What descriptive details does the author use to help you visualize parts of the story? What details help you picture the characters and setting?”  
  • In Unit 3, Week 1, Lesson 2, Student Interactive, page 39, Check for Understanding, students compare “How are the Frogs in ‘The Frogs at the Rainbow’s End’ and the Mouse in ‘The Mouse at the Seashore’ alike? How are they different?”
  • In Unit 4, Week 2, Lesson 3, Reading Workshop, Close Read, students learn how to annotate the text to use text features. The teacher models for students how to annotate the text to use text features by reading aloud Building on Nature: The Life of Antoni Gaudi. After the teacher explains and models how to identify the text features students have the option to: "1. Students continue to read Building on Nature: The Life of Antoni Gaudi and annotate the text to complete a text feature graphic organizer on page 310 of the Student Interactive. 2. Students create a chart showing text features and how these features help them understand the text, gain information, or locate information."
  • In Unit 4, Week 4, Lesson 3, Reading Workshop, Shared Read: After a shared read of Who Says Women Can’t Be Doctors?, students answer, “What person caused Elizabeth to want to become a doctor? What event happened that caused Elizabeth to want to become a doctor?” Students must go back into the text to underline the details to reference the text in order to answer the questions.

Indicator 1h

Materials contain sets of high-quality sequences of text-based questions with activities that build to a culminating task which integrates skills to demonstrate understanding (as appropriate, may be drawing, dictating, writing, speaking, or a combination).
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria for materials containing sets of high-quality sequences of text-based questions with activities that build to a culminating task which integrates skills to demonstrate understanding (as appropriate, may be drawing, dictating, writing, speaking, or a combination).

Materials include culminating tasks across a year’s worth of material. Culminating tasks are varied and provide opportunities for students to demonstrate what they know and are able to do in speaking and writing. Each unit ends with Week 6 as an Inquiry Project where students research a real world issue and are asked to consider what they have learned across the unit to further develop their skills. Additionally, materials include a Unit Essential Question and Weekly Essential Questions that students answer to reflect on their learning.

Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, the Unit Essential Question is, "How do different places affect us?" Each week, students read a text related to the unit theme and answer a weekly Essential Question during Reflect and Share and are asked to use what they learned from the week. At the end of the Unit, students answer the Unit Essential Question.
    • Week 1 Essential Question: What can we learn about a place when we look at it closely?
    • Week 2 Essential Question: How can people improve their neighborhoods?
    • Week 3 Essential Question: How does living in a community help people?
    • Week 4 Essential Question: How do different places make us feel? 
    • Week 5 Essential Question: How can a new place help us change and grow?
  • In Unit 3, the Unit Essential Question is, "What makes a tradition?" Each week, students read a text related to the unit theme and answer a weekly Essential Question during Reflect and Share and are asked to use what they learned from the week. At the end of the Unit, students answer the Unit Essential Question.
    • Week 1 Essential Question: What stories do people tell to understand the world around them?
    • Week 2 Essential Question: What stories do people tell to understand the world around them?
    • Week 3 Essential Question: How can a traditional story be told in different ways?
    • Week 4 Essential Question: What makes a Native American tradition?
    • Week 5 Essential Question: How does food help make a tradition?
  • In Unit 5, the Unit Essential Question is, "How does earth change?" Each week, students read a text related to the unit theme and answer a weekly Essential Question during Reflect and Share and are asked to use what they learned from the week. At the end of the Unit, students answer the Unit Essential Question.
    • Week 1 Essential Question: What are some of Earth's changing features?
    • Week 2 Essential Question: How do natural events change the earth?
    • Week 3 Essential Question: How does weather change Earth?
    • Week 4 Essential Question: How does a volcano eruption change Earth?
    • Week 5 Essential Question: What can rocks explain about how Earth changes?


Indicator 1i

Materials provide frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions (small group, peer-to-peer, whole class) that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax.
2/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria for materials providing frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions (small groups, peer-to-peer, whole class) that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax.

The materials provide multiple opportunities for evidence-based discussions across the entire scope of instructional materials. The Small Group Guide contains protocols for teachers to teach, model, and practice with students when collaborating with their peers. For example, Small Group Guide protocols for Book Club include come to Book Club prepared, listen to what others have to say, and do not interrupt. Most lessons provide discussion protocols for turn and talks, whole group discussions, and small group discussions. The teacher materials support evidence-based discussions and encourage modeling with a focus on using academic vocabulary and syntax. Students are provided with guidelines and objectives to engage in collaborative discussion. Students have the opportunity to share during each lesson and carry out discourse through several activities. 

Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 2, Week 5, Lesson 5, students follow the prompt given on page 406 of the Student Interactive to Disagree Respectfully when needed in a discussion with a partner. Examples of sentence starters that help students disagree respectfully can be found on the same page: “I agree with you about …, but, …” or “I see what you mean about…, but I also think…”
  • In Unit 3, Week 4, Lesson 2, during the first read of The Abenaki, students are asked to think about the author’s message. Students discuss, “What is important to the Abenaki? How do you know?”  Sentence frames are provided if needed: “_____ is important to the Abernaki because _____.”
  • In Unit 4, Week 6, Lesson 3, students challenge the text by critically thinking about literacy. Using an article, students review and recognize characteristics of a text. Students are given sentence stems to help clarify their positions on taking action. Students discuss orally and take turns with their partners. They are encouraged to use academic vocabulary from the unit. 
  • In Unit 5, Week 1, Lesson 3, Describe Connections, teachers are directed to give students extra oral practice using their vocabulary words to describe connections between stories. Sentence frames are provided for this activity: "Some different resources we find on Earth are _____ and _____. Our environment can be affected by _____."
  • In Unit 5, Week 3, Lesson 5, during the reflect and share lesson, the teacher models how to participate in the discussion by referring to the text to support original opinions or ideas. Students are given sentence starters: “I think _____. I read _____.” The students then talk about it with peers.
  • In Unit 5, Week 6, Lesson 4, Project-Based Inquiry, Collaborate and Discuss, students create a TV infomercial that persuades the audience to agree with their opinions about the most exciting way Earth changes. Students decide if they will post a video of their infomercial on the school’s website or read the script aloud to the class. The teacher  reminds students of the effective traits for giving a speech:
    • Speak clearly at an appropriate pace and remember your purpose: to persuade. Sometimes you may want to raise your voice and speed up your pace. At other times, you may want to slow down and speak more softly. Either method may help you persuade your audience to agree with you.
    • Listen attentively to other presenters. Pay attention to facts and opinions in each one.
    • Make personal connections to your own experiences as you listen.
    • Ask appropriate questions and listen to the answers. Listen carefully to questions from the people who hear your presentation, and give thoughtful answers. Share information that focuses on the topic under discussion.

Indicator 1j

Materials support students' listening and speaking about what they are reading (or read aloud) and researching (shared projects) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria for materials supporting students’ listening and speaking about what they are reading (or read aloud) and researching (shared projects) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.

Speaking and listening instruction takes place regularly over the course of the school year and includes facilitation, monitoring, and instructional supports for teachers. The materials include practice for speaking and listening skills that support students’ increase in ability over the course of the school year. The teacher regularly models using think alouds and facilitates the students talking about what they are listening to or reading throughout the year. Students regularly demonstrate what they are reading and researching through varied speaking and listening opportunities. Speaking and listening work requires students to gather evidence from texts and sources. Students have the opportunity to speak about shared projects.  Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Week 2, Lesson 1, students respond to the read-aloud by orally completing a graphic organizer to tell who the main characters are and name their character traits. Answering the questions, “Who are the main characters in this story? What are they like?”
  • In Unit 1, Book Clubs, students read Friends Around the World in small groups. After reading, students discuss the photographs in the book. Students will list Noticings, Connections, and Wonderings about the photographs on the Discussion Chart. If groups are having a hard time deciding what to discuss, the teacher asks the following questions: “What do you notice about the size of Ho Chi Minh City? What differences do you notice about weather in the places pictured in the book?”
  • In Unit 1, Week 6, Lesson 5, Celebrate and Reflect, students write and present a persuasive paragraph about a favorite place in their community. Pairs of students will practice presenting their essays with other teams. Before presenting the paragraphs, the teacher reminds students of the traits of effective speech:
    • “When I read the essay aloud, I do not stare down at my paper. Once in a while, I looked up to make eye contact with my audience.”
    • “I shared my ideas by speaking clearly at an appropriate pace. I did not rush. I read a little more slowly than I usually talk so the audience could hear and understand every word.”
    • “To make sure others understood the information and ideas I shared, I followed language conventions, including speaking in complete sentences. I pronounced each word correctly.”
  • In Unit 2, Week 4, Lesson 2:  Reading Workshop, Shared Read, during reading What’s in the Egg, Little Pip?, the teacher prompts students to “talk with a partner about how Pip and Merry feel when they find out both of their families have an egg. What is the author saying about how it feels when friends share feelings?” Students must use evidence from the story to answer these questions.
  • In Unit 3, Week 1, Lesson 1, Genre and Theme, students learn about the elements and structure of fables. Students turn and talk with a partner to answer the following questions: “Tell what happens in a fable you know. What is its moral? What makes it a fable?”
  • In Unit 3, Week 2, Lesson 1, Reading Workshop, Genre and Theme, students learn the elements and characteristics of a legend, then students read Thunder and Lightning. Students discuss the text with a partner and tell why it is a legend. 
  • Unit 4, Week 6, Students read the research article, “Time Capsules,” to build background knowledge. Students work in partners to discuss text connections, using sentence stems provided: “This reminds me of ____. One item that is important to me is ____. I read a book about sharing or saving things, and I remember ____.”
  • In Unit 5, Week 1, Lesson 1:  Genre & Theme, students discuss in small groups the Earth’s features using the Infographic, “Earth’s Features.” The teacher provides questions to facilitate discussion among the groups: “How does the air protect us from harmful light and objects in space? What are the different types of water on Earth? Why do clouds drop rain and snow on Earth? Where does the rain go?”

Indicator 1k

Materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g. multiple drafts, revisions over time) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria for materials including a mix of on-demand and process writing grade-appropriate writing (e.g. grade-appropriate revision and editing) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.

The materials include a mix of both on-demand and process writing, covering a year’s worth of instruction. Materials also include short and longer writing tasks and projects. Opportunities for students to revise and edit are provided and materials include digital resources where appropriate. The Steps to Writing Independently are outlined in the Launching Writing Workshop section of the Teacher Edition. This gradual release model guides teachers to present writing in a supported process, moving through a modeled writing, shared writing, guided writing, and ending with independent writing. Conference prompts are provided for the teacher to utilize when identifying additional supports for students. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Week 3, during the second and third Minilessons of the Writing Workshop, students explore and then apply the “structure of fiction” to a text. In Minilesson 2, students explore the structure and the teacher presents story characters, settings, and plots using the suggested Mentor Stack. In Independent Writing, students think of plots for their fiction stories and, if needed, teachers guide the development of their idea through the use of the conference prompts. In Minilesson 3, students deepen their plots by elaborating on problems and solutions. As students become more familiar with the structures, they begin writing their own stories. 
  • In Unit 2, Week 1, Writer’s Workshop, students learn that a list article is an article in which the author lists numbered details that support a main idea. Students then begin to create their own list article, using the Stack Books as models to identify a topic, main idea, and create graphics.
  • In Unit 3, Week 3, Lesson 3, Reading-Writing Workshop Bridge, students study folktales. They are given a beginning sentence in thei Student Interactive and are asked to add details to the story. For example, “Imagine you are writing the story of Cinderella. Start with this sentence and write two more sentences. Choose words to help you develop story events. Cinderella’s stepsisters are getting ready for the ball.”
  • In Unit 4, Week 2, Lesson 5, Reading Workshop, Compare Texts, students choose buildings from their readings and write an opinion about two of the buildings. Students are provided with a resource in the Student Interactive which defines what an opinion is and includes a list of opinion words to support student writing. This is a short, focused writing activity that is connected to the texts they have read.
  • In Unit 4, Week 6, Lessons 1-5, Writing Workshop, students collect personal items to include in a group time capsule. Students also write letters to themselves about the time capsule. In the first Minilesson, students plan their letters by thinking about key words and vocabulary to use in an internet search. In the second Minilesson, students begin collecting items to put in their time capsule. In the third Minilesson, students create a list of the items in the time capsule and why they included that item. In the fourth Minilesson, students write their letters. Then they revise and edit their letters. In the fifth Minilesson, students share their time capsule with the class.
  • In Unit 5, Week 2, Lesson 2, Reader’s Workshop, Shared Reading, students read How Water Shapes the Earth and How Earthquakes Shape the Earth. Students then respond in writing to answer the question, “What did you learn from reading these texts?” Students complete the following free write: “Write about the most interesting thing you read in the two texts. Why did you find it so interesting?”
  • In Unit 5, Week 5, Writing Workshop, the first and second Minilessons cover editing the text for pronouns and capitalization. Students review sets of texts and practice editing skills. In the Independent Writing block, students review their own sets of procedural writing for correct use of pronouns and capitalization. The teacher uses the conference prompts on page 396 of the Teacher Edition to guide the process. In the Student Interactive, page 662, students edit the greetings and closings of a letter for correct abbreviations and capitalization. In the next three Minilessons in Week 5 of the Writing Workshop, students revise their procedural writing one last time before publishing and celebrating (sharing) their texts.

Indicator 1l

Materials provide opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criteria for materials providing opportunities for students to address different text types of writing (year long) that reflect the distribution required by the standards.

The materials provide multiple opportunities across the school year for students to learn, practice, and apply different genres, modes, and types of writing; however, opportunities are missed for students to learn opinion writing. Each Unit includes the same opinion writing folder with five lessons for opinion writing, but no guidance is included on when or how to use the lessons. Additionally, the folder is not directly connected to the core materials and may be overlooked.

Opportunities for students and teachers to monitor progress in writing skills are provided. Where appropriate, writing opportunities are connected to texts and/or text sets which include prompts, models, anchors, or supports. Each lesson offers a purpose for the writing, a teaching and modeling section, examples to help guide students, shared writing practice, and independent writing practice. Students receive daily lessons on writing through the Reading-Writing Bridge and the daily Writing Workshop. Rubrics for writing are available for each of the genres, as well as a 4-point writing rubric.

Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Weeks 1-5, Writing Workshop, students learn about the structures of fiction and nonfiction texts. Students have the option to write a fiction or nonfiction text during Writer’s Workshop. During the five weeks, students write a variety of genres, brainstorm ideas in their writing notebooks, use dictionaries and thesauruses to help with spelling, use digital resources to enhance their writing, use digital resources to publish their writing, edit and revise their writing, and share a final draft with other students.
  • In Unit 2, Week 1, Writing Workshop, students are introduced to list articles. The objective is to write informative texts that introduce a topic, use facts and definitions to develop points, and provide a conclusion. In Independent Writing, students explore various informational articles, focusing on topics they enjoy. Students begin writing lists about the topics they have read. Throughout the week, students focus on the concepts of main ideas and details, features, graphics, and planning their list articles. Students continue to explore these in Week 2. In Week 3, students explore the structures of introduction, conclusion, and how to organize their text. In Week 5, students edit and prepare for publishing. 
  • In Unit 3, Weeks 1-5, Writing Workshop, students learn about the structures and elements of poetry. Students write a poem utilizing the information they learned about the structures and elements of poetry using Stack Books. During the five weeks, students learn how to include imagery and words that create effects in their poems, include similes and metaphors, record themselves reading aloud the poem to identify any additions to the poem, and to edit and revise their poems. Students then share a final draft of their poems with other students.
  • In Unit 4, Week 1, Writing Workshop, students are introduced to personal narratives, with the objective of recounting an event or short sequence of events, including details to describe actions, thoughts and feelings. The use of temporal words to signal order and provide closure are also introduced. Through a modeled shared and guided writing, students receive explicit directions on planning for their personal narrative. Character, setting and plots are developed in the first week, along with the generation of ideas and a plan for the narrative. These are further developed in Week 2. In Week 3, students work on sequence of events and explore conclusions. Week 4 focuses on grammar. In Week 5, students edit their writing and prepare for publishing. 
  • In Unit 5, Week 1, Writing Workshop, students are exposed to how-to procedural texts. Students explore the genre through model and practice and shared and guided writing. Discussion and questioning is centered around the theme of the how-to books. The first week covers how to write detailed instructions, utilize graphics, generate ideas and brainstorm. Weeks 2 and 3 dive deeper into those same topics by developing each part of the text. Week 4 focuses on grammar and spelling. Week 5 is reserved for revising, publishing and celebrating. Students complete an assessment writing how-to book. A four-point rubric is provided.

Indicator 1m

Materials include regular opportunities for evidence-based writing to support recall of information, opinions with reasons, and relevant information appropriate for the grade level.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria for materials including regular opportunities for evidence-based writing to support recall of information, opinions with reasons, and relevant information appropriate for the grade level.

The materials provide frequent and regular opportunities during the school year for students to learn, practice, and apply writing and respond to text using evidence. Writing opportunities are focused around student’s understanding of texts and ability to create, respond, and build upon the text. Each week the shared reading text is revisited on two additional days as a close read and students respond in the Student Interactive. The materials provide opportunities that build writing skills over the course of the school year. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Week 3, Lesson 3, Reader’s Workshop, Close Read, after reading Places We Go, the teacher models finding clues in the text to determine the main idea. Using the underlined clues in the text, the teacher guides students in finding the main idea in three sections of the book. Students then record the main ideas on the chart in the Student Interactive. Then, in Lesson 4, Close Read, students read Places We Go. Students learn what text evidence is and how to identify it to support the main idea. Then students are asked to complete one of the following tasks: "1. Complete the text evidence graphic organizer on page 119 of the Student Interactive. 2. Read a text independently and use a graphic organizer to identify text evidence and the main idea of the text."
  • In Unit 4, Week 2, Lesson 5, Reflect and Share, students read Building on Nature: The Life of Antoni Gaudi. Students learn that writers include opinions in their writing. Then students make personal connections and write an opinion about a text using details and examples from the text. Students are asked to complete one of the following tasks: "1. Students use page 312 of the Student Interactive to write their opinion using details from the text about two buildings they read about in Building on Nature: The Life of Antoni Gaudi. 2. Students write an opinion paragraph about a text that they have read independently. Students will use details and examples from the text to support their opinion."
  • In Unit 5, Week 2, Lesson 3, Reading Workshop, Close Read, after rereading the texts, How Water Shapes the Earth and How Earthquakes Shape the Earth, students use a graphic organizer to compare and contrast water and earthquakes, using their close read notes in the Student Interactive. Support for writing a comparison is provided under the ELL Targeted Support section with sentence frames: “Both water and earthquakes can _____. Water does it _____. Earthquakes do it _____.”

Indicator 1n

Materials include explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria for materials including explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context. 

The materials include explicit instruction of all grammar and conventions standards for the grade level. The majority of the grammar and conventions lessons are presented in Writing Workshop and the Reading-Writing Workshop Bridge as whole group materials. The students are provided additional practice of these standards with the Student Interactive that corresponds with the presented lessons. Each lesson is similarly structured with a Teaching Point and then Model. The Language Awareness Handbook has additional lessons and student applications for grammar and conventions. Student practice of grammar and conventions is done orally, in isolation during whole group, partner work, and independent work, or in-context.  

Materials include explicit instruction of all grammar and conventions standards for the grade level, and materials include opportunities for students to demonstrate application of skills both in- and out-of-context. Examples include, but are not limited to:

Students have opportunities to use collective nouns (e.g., group). 

  • In Unit 2, Week 5, Lesson 5, Reading-Writing Workshop Bridge, Language & Conventions, Collective Nouns, the teacher and the students read the definition of collective nouns, then the students choose the correct form of a word and write it into a sentence.
  • In Unit 3, Week 1, Lesson 1, Language & Conventions, Spiral Review, the teacher reminds students that a collective noun names a group of persons or things emphasizing that it is singular even though it names a group of more than one. With a partner, students create a list of collective nouns and put the words into sentences.

Students have opportunities to form and use frequently occurring irregular plural nouns (e.g., feet, children, teeth, mice, fish). 

  • In Unit 2, Week 2, Lesson 1, Language & Conventions, Irregular Plural Nouns, Spiral Review, teachers are directed to remind students that a word is plural when it names more than one of something. Teachers review irregular plural nouns with examples. Teachers provide word cards and with students categorize them into singular and plural nouns. Afterwards, students categorize the plural nouns into regular and irregular.
  • In Unit 2, Week 2, Lesson 5, Language & Conventions, Irregular Plural Nouns, the students write an irregular plural noun into a sentence.

Students have opportunities to use reflexive pronouns (e.g., myself, ourselves). 

  • In Unit 4, Week 5, Lesson 3, Reading-Writing Bridge, Language & Conventions, Reflexive Pronouns, the teacher reminds students that a reflexive pronoun is one that refers back to the subject. The teacher writes a sentence frame on the board and helps students complete the sentence with a reflexive pronoun. With a partner, students complete another sentence frame with a reflexive pronoun and explain their choice.
  • In Unit 5, Week 5, Writing Workshop, Edit for Pronouns, the teacher uses scripted language to explain to the students what reflexive pronouns are in the context of a sentence written on the board. Students orally provide additional example sentences that contain reflexive pronouns. Students edit a paragraph to correct mistakes regarding reflexive pronouns.

Students have opportunities to form and use the past tense of frequently occurring irregular verbs (e.g., sat, hid, told). 

  • In Unit 3, Week 3, Lesson 2, Reading-Writing Workshop Bridge, Language & Conventions, Irregular Verbs, the teacher writes present tense irregular words on the board and students generate orally with a partner the past tense of the irregular verbs.
  • In Unit 3, Week 3, Lesson 3, Reading-Writing Workshop Bridge, Language & Conventions, Irregular Verbs, p. 241, the teachers remind students that while -ed can be added to most verbs to form the past tense, irregular verbs do not follow this rule. The teacher tells students that they will need to memorize the spellings of irregular past tense verbs. The teacher displays present tense sentences. Students choose correct irregular verbs and then change them to past tense to complete the sentences. 

Students have opportunities to use adjectives and adverbs, and choose between them depending on what is to be modified. 

  • In Unit 4, Week 5, Writing Workshop, Edit for Adjectives and Adverbs, the teacher displays a stack text, then reads from the script in the Teacher Edition to state the definitions of adjectives and adverbs. In the Student Interactive, p. 441, students edit a paragraph. Students add adjectives and adverbs to enrich the passage and also correct mistakes in the usage of adjectives and adverbs.

Students have opportunities to produce, expand, and rearrange complete simple and compound sentences (e.g., The boy watched the movie; The little boy watched the movie; The action movie was watched by the little boy). 

  • In Unit 5, Week 4, Writing Workshop, Apply Rearranging Words, the teacher reads a script to model the effectiveness of rearranging words and sentences. In the Student Interactive, p. 627, students revise a paragraph by rearranging words and/or sentences.

Students have opportunities to capitalize holidays, product names, and geographic names. 

  • In Unit 4, Week 4, Writing Workshop, Capitalization and Commas, the teacher reads a script to explain that “names of people, places, months, and days of the week should always be capitalized.” In the Student Interactive, p. 405, students edit a letter by correcting capitalization errors.

Students have opportunities to use commas in greetings and closings of letters. 

  • In Unit 4, Week 3, Lesson 3, Reading-Writing Workshop Bridge, Teach Commas in Dates and Letters, the teacher writes a friendly letter on the board and explains to students where commas go in greetings and closings. The teacher asks the students to tell where the commas should go in the example letter. The students tell the teacher where the commas go.

Students have opportunities to use an apostrophe to form contractions and frequently occurring possessives. 

  • In Unit 2, Week 4, Lesson 3, Reading-Writing Workshop Bridge, Language & Conventions, Possessive Nouns, p. 319, the teacher reminds students that a possessive noun shows ownership. With students, the teacher reviews the placement of an apostrophe. Student volunteers complete the routine.
  • In Unit 2, Week 1, Lesson 4, Reading Workshop, Word Work, Phonics, Review Contractions, the teacher reviews the rule of turning two words into a contraction. The teacher writes an example on the board. Students are provided with words and engage in a matching activity connecting words with the corresponding contractions.

Students have opportunities to generalize learned spelling patterns when writing words (e.g., cage → badge; boy → boil). 

  • In Unit 3, Week 4, Lesson 4, Reading-Writing Workshop Bridge, Spelling, Spell words with ou, ow, oi, oy, the teacher writes words on the board that contain the target orthographic patterns. The teacher says each word, while circling the target pattern. Students write new words with the same spelling patterns. 

Students have opportunities to consult reference materials, including beginning dictionaries, as needed to check and correct spellings. 

  • In Unit 1, Week 2, Writing Workshop, Explore Tools Authors Use, the teacher explains how to use a dictionary by saying that students should think about how a word is spelled, then work to find the word in the dictionary. If they cannot find it with the first spelling they imagined, they should think of a different spelling. Students are told they should also review the definition. The teacher models looking up a word. Students work in groups using dictionaries to determine if words given by the teacher are spelled correctly or not.

Students have opportunities to compare formal and informal uses of English. 

  • In Unit 3, Week 6, Lesson 4, Inquiry and Research, Extend Research, Write a Thank You Note, p. 426-427, the teacher reminds students that letters and thank you notes are usually formal. The teacher shares a model example of a thank you note and review the parts including how to formally close a thank you note.

Criterion 1o - 1t

Materials in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language targeted to support foundational reading development are aligned to the standards.
22/22
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criterion for materials in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language targeted to support foundational reading development are aligned to the standards; however, instructional timing is limited to 15 minutes daily, which is not sufficient for students to master grade-level foundational skills. Materials, questions, and tasks directly teach foundational skills to build reading acquisition by providing systematic and explicit instruction in the alphabetic principle, letter-sound relationships, phonemic awareness, and phonics that demonstrate a transparent and research-based progression with opportunities for application both in and out of context. Materials, questions, and tasks also provide explicit instruction for and regular practice to address the acquisition of print concepts, including alphabetic knowledge, directionality, function, and structures and features of text. Instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and gain decoding automaticity and sight-based recognition of high-frequency words, as well as fluency in oral reading. Materials, questions, and tasks provide systematic and explicit instruction in and practice of word recognition and analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected text and tasks. The materials support ongoing and frequent assessment to determine student mastery and inform meaningful differentiation of foundational skills, including a clear and specific protocol as to how students performing below standard on these assessments will be supported.

Indicator 1o

Materials, questions, and tasks directly teach foundational skills to build reading acquisition by providing systematic and explicit instruction in the alphabetic principle, letter-sound relations, phonemic awareness, phonological awareness (K-1), and phonics (K-2) that demonstrate a transparent and research-based progression with opportunities for application both in and out of context.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria for materials, questions, and tasks directly teach foundational skills to build reading acquisition by providing systematic and explicit instruction in the alphabetic principle, letter-sound relationships, phonemic awareness, and phonological awareness (K-1), and phonics (K-2) that demonstrate a transparent and research-based progression for application both in and out of context.

Over the course of the year, Grade 2 students receive explicit instruction in phonics in each unit. Lessons within each unit include a five-day focus with systematic and explicit instruction. Students are engaged in phonics lessons during the Reading Workshop Word Work instruction. Students are engaged in a variety of activities that allow them to interact with the instruction of phonics, including decoding and encoding words based on letter patterns, and recognizing common orthographic letter patterns. 

Materials, questions, and tasks directly teach foundational skills to build reading acquisition application in and out of context. Lessons and activities provide students opportunities to learn grade-level phonics skills while decoding words (e.g. distinguish long and short vowel sounds, apply spelling-sound relationship on common words, decode two-syllable words with long vowels). Example include, but are not limited to: 

Distinguish long and short vowels when reading regularly spelled one-syllable words.

  • In Unit 1, Week 1, Lesson 1, Reading Workshop, Word Work, Phonics: Long and Short Vowels, p. 22, the teacher shows the students two pictures in the Student Interactive of a bat and gate asking the students to listen to the vowel sound in each word and name the short and long vowel. Students listen to the teacher say short and long vowel words clapping once for short vowels and twice for long vowels as practice. This lesson leads into a phonics long and short vowel lesson; the teacher explains that CVC words are short vowels and models decoding short vowel words. Students practice by comparing short vowel words with long vowel e final ending words.
  • In Unit 1, Week 1, Lesson 3 (Flexible Option), Reading-Writing Workshop Bridge, Spelling Spell Words with Short Vowels, p. 78-79, the teacher has students spell five one-syllable words with closed syllables while the teacher underlines the short vowel in each. Also, using Spelling from the Resource Download Center, p. 23, students spell one-syllable words with closed syllables and short vowel sounds by reading words from the word box and writing a spelling word to complete sentences.
  • In Unit 1, Week 2, Flexible Option, Lesson 3, Reading-Writing Workshop Bridge, Spelling Spell Words with Long Vowels (CVCe), p. 154-155, the teacher displays five CVCe words and reads and spells the first word aloud. Students repeat after the teacher then read and spell the remaining words aloud.
  • Using Spelling from the Resource Download Center, p. 24, students spell one-syllable and multisyllabic CVCe words by reading words from the word box and writing a spelling word to complete sentences.

Know spelling-sound correspondences for additional common vowel teams.

  • In Unit 2, Week 2, Lesson 2, Reading-Writing Workshop Bridge, Spelling Spell Words with Long a: ai, ay, ea, p. 152-153, the teacher explains that the long /a/ sound can be spelled ai, ay, and ea. The teacher writes main, pay, daybreak, sailor, and great on the board, says each word emphasizing the long /a/ sound as they underline the long /a/ spelling pattern. Students spell these one-syllable and multisyllabic words. In Student Interactive p. 285, students spell one-syllable and multisyllabic words with vowel teams.
  • In Unit 2, Week 5, Lessons 2 and 3, Reading Writing Workshop Bridge, Spelling Spell Words with Long o: o, oa, ow, pp. 390-391, the teacher explains that the long vowel /o/ can be spelled several ways with vowel teams. During the model and practice, the teacher displays words for students, and they practice underlining the letters that work together to make the long /o/ sound.
  • In Unit 3, Week 5, Lesson 3, Reading Workshop, Word Work, Phonics: Review Vowel Teams oo, ue, ew, ui, the teacher explains that vowel sounds can have multiple spellings. The teacher writes example words on the board, and underlines the vowel sound spelling (i.e., spoon, clue, few, and fruit). The teacher and the students orally decode the words. The teacher uses explicit language and thinks out loud to the students. The teacher explains to look at spelling patterns in words to help with reading the words. The teacher defines vowel digraphs. The students work in student pairs to sort words with the target spellings into columns based on their vowel sounds. 

Decode regularly spelled two-syllable words with long vowels.

  • In Unit 4, Week 2, Lesson 1, Reading Workshop, Word Work, Phonics:  Decode Words with Open Syllables V/CV, p. 102-103, the teacher points to the word go on p. 280 of the Student Interactive, says the word emphasizing the long vowel sound, and explains that it is an open syllable. The teacher points to the word, paperand explains it has two syllables, the VCV pattern and VCV syllable division. The teacher points to the word, bonus, says the word, and leads students in breaking the word into syllables and blending back. In Student Interactive, p. 280, students read the words with open syllables in the chart and divide the words into syllables, underlining the open syllable in each word.
  • In Unit 4, Week 2, Lesson 2, Reading Workshop, Word Work: Phonics: Decode and Write Words with Open Syllables V/CV, the teacher reminds the students that there is a vowel sound in every syllable. The teacher explains that a syllable that ends in a vowel often means the vowel says its long sound. The teacher uses explicit language and thinks out loud to the students, explaining the number of vowel sounds s/he hears, and the letter patterns s/he sees. The teacher writes the word, robot, on the board and the students segment the word in syllables, then blend the syllables to say the word. The students write two words given to them by the teacher. The students then "break the words into syllables and identify the long vowel." In Student Interactive, p. 281, students decode words with open syllables by writing the syllables of each word on lines and circling the open syllables.

Decode words with common prefixes and suffixes.

  • In Unit 4, Week 3, Lesson 1, Reading Workshop, Word Work, Phonics: Decode Words with Suffixes -ly, -ful, -er, -less, -or, p. 182, the teacher explains a suffix is added to the end of the base word to create a new word and meaning. The teacher adds the suffix -ly to a word and discusses the new meaning; students identify the meaning and use the new word in a sentence. In the Student Interactive, p. 322, students practice underlining the base word and circling the suffix of words.
  • In Unit 4, Week 4, Lesson 2,  Reading Workshop, Word Work, Phonics: Decode and Write Words with Prefixes un-, re-, pre-, dis-, p. 266, the teacher reminds the students that the prefix changes the meaning of the base word, and the teacher reviews decoding words with a prefix. Students practice by saying the word, the prefix, and the words meaning for five words; the students also decode by identifying the prefix and read the words aloud. In  the Student Interactive, p. 367, students decode the words with prefixes and identify the word meaning based on the prefixes.

Identify words with inconsistent but common spelling-sound correspondences. 

  • In Unit 3, Week 5, Lesson 1, Reading Workshop Word Work, Phonics: Decode Words with Vowel Teams oo, ue, ew, ui, p. 330, the teacher explains that oo, ue, ew, ui are all vowel teams that make the same long vowel /u/ sound. In the Student Interactive, p. 174, the teacher models and students see and practice saying words with different long /u/ vowel teams noticing the spelling that represents the sound.
  • In Unit 3, Week 5, Lesson 3 (Flexible Option), Reading-Writing Workshop Bridge, Spelling Spell Words with Vowel Teams oo, ue, ew, ui, p. 390-391, the teacher reminds students that the sound in soon can be spelled with the vowel teams oo, ue, ew, and ui. The teacher displays the words cue, fewer, cocoon, and cruise. Students spell each word and then sound out and say each word. Volunteers use each word in a sentence. Also, using Spelling from the Resource Download Center, p. 151, students read words with vowel teams oo, ue, ew, and ui from the word box and complete sentences. 

Materials have a cohesive sequence of phonics instruction to build toward application.

  • In Scope and Sequence, Phonics, Unit 1, p. R28, it indicates the following skills are taught: Connect sounds and letters to consonants, know sound-letter relationships and match sounds to letters, generate sounds from letters and blend those sounds to decode (consonants, consonant blends, and consonant digraphs & short and long vowels & r-controlled vowels, vowel digraphs, and other common vowel patterns), decode multisyllabic words, and recognize common letter patterns and use them to decode syllables (CVC, VCCV, VCV, VCCCV).
  • In Unit 1, the phonics skills are review skills from Grade 1, such as short vowels, long vowels (CVCe), consonant blends, consonant digraphs, and inflected endings.
  • In Unit 2, the phonics skills include long /a/ (ai, ay, ea), vowel digraph ie, long /e/ (ee, ea, ey, y), and long /o/ (o, oa, ow).
  • In Unit 3, the phonics skills include long /i/ (i, ie, i_e, igh, y), comparative endings, r-controlled vowels (er, ir, ur), diphthongs (ou, ow, oi, oy), vowel teams (oo, ue, ew, ui).
  • In Unit 4, the phonics skills include closed syllables (VC/V), open syllables (V/CV), suffixes, prefixes.
  • In Unit 5, the phonics skills include: homographs, double consonants, vowel patterns (aw, au, augh, al), syllable pattern VCCCV, and abbreviations.

Indicator 1p

Materials, questions, and tasks provide explicit instruction for and regular practice to address the acqusition of print concepts, including alphabetic knowledge, directionality, and function (K-1), structures and features of text (1-2).
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria for materials, questions, and tasks provide explicit instruction for and regular practice to address the acquisition of print concepts, including alphabetic knowledge, and directionality (K-1), structures and features of text (1-2).

In myView, text structures and text features are frequently taught during teacher mini lessons and are referenced multiple times over the course of the five units. Student activities include orally identifying text features, sequence of events, main ideas and details, and facts that are the same and different across texts. For text structures, materials support instruction with student engagement in Writing and Reading Workshop. Students are provided lessons and practice to help build their understanding of the text structures with activities that allow the student to apply the skills with an activity such as underlining or discussing the function and importance of the structure. For text features, students are given opportunities to practice locating, naming, and establishing the purpose of the features in the text. 

Students have opportunities to identify text structures (e.g. main idea and details, sequence of events, problem & solution, compare and contrast, cause and effect). For example: 

  • In Unit 1, Week 5, Lesson 3, Reading Workshop, Describe and Understand Plot Elements, the teacher models how to look for sentences that describe plot elements related to the main event, the problem, and the resolution in a passage on the students' interactive. Students underline the sentences that describe how the main character solves her problem.
  • In Unit 2, Week 4, Lesson 5, Reading Workshop, Reflect and Share, Write to Sources, the teacher models how to organize a paragraph by explaining that a main idea is the first part to think about and can become the topic sentence. The teacher explains that writing sentences to support the main idea is the next important part of writing a paragraph. The teacher provides this explicit instruction in the context of writing a paragraph about animals. Students develop a paragraph in response to a paragraph using the modeled approach the teacher showed the students.
  • In Unit 3, Week 3, Lesson 3, Reading Workshop, Compare and Contrast Stories, the teacher describes how to compare and contrast two stories. The teacher uses a graphic organizer to show how to write items that are the same across the stories in one column and items that are different in a second column. Students find additional items to compare and contrast and share them with the group. Students work independently with an additional pair of stories to create their own two-column chart to note items that are the same and different across the two stories.
  • In Unit 4, Week 4, Lesson 3, Reading Workshop, Identify Text Structure, the teacher describes how to identify sentences that indicate sequence of events, then underlines the sentences to show students the technique of using underlining in close reading activities to identify important parts of the text. The teacher explains words in the text that indicate time-order of events. The students mark their independent texts where they find time-order words indicating sequence of events.
  • In Unit 5, Week 5, Lesson 3, Reading Workshop, Identify Main Idea, pages T374-375, the teacher explains informational texts have a main idea and authors develop the main idea with supporting evidence. The teacher uses the Close Read note on p. 638 of the Student Interactive to model how to underline sentences that state and support the main idea. In the Student Interactive, p. 654, students use what the class underlined to complete the chart on  identifying the main idea and providing supporting evidence. 

Materials include lessons and activities about text features (e.g. title, byline, headings, table of contents, glossary, pictures, illustrations). For example: 

  • In Unit 1, Week 5, Lesson 3, Reading-Writing Workshop Bridge, Read Like a Writer, Write for a Reader, How Graphic Features Support Purpose, pages T370-371, the teacher models using the example on Student Interactive p. 188 to show students how graphic features can enhance understanding. Students write a sentence about an animal they like and draw a picture to help the reader understand.
  • In Unit 2, Week 3, Writing Workshop, Explore Text Features, p. 245, the teacher displays an article and the students identify the text features and name its purpose. The teacher and students also identify the bold words and discuss the importance.  
  • In Unit 3, Week 5, Lesson 3, Reading Workshop, Understand Text Features, the teacher models a think-aloud to the students regarding the use of text features in a passage on the Student Interactive. The students work in pairs to discuss why the author used certain text features in the text.
  • In Unit 4, Week 2, Lesson 3, Reading Workshop, Use Text Features, the teacher models how using text features helps to understand text. Students create a chart listing the text features and noting how the features help them understand the text. Titles, pictures/illustrations, captions, and headings are included.

Indicator 1q

Instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and gain decoding automaticity and sight-based recognition of high frequency words. This includes reading fluency in oral reading beginning in mid-Grade 1 and through Grade 2.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria for instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and gain decoding automaticity and sight-based recognition of high-frequency words. This includes reading fluency in oral reading beginning in mid Grade 1 and through Grade 2.

During phonics and word study Minilessons, which are in each five-day sequence of each unit, students have the opportunity to read and write words with the high-frequency word focus. High-frequency words are introduced and/or reviewed on a daily basis. Students have multiple opportunities to develop automaticity of grade level words through multiple reads of leveled readers. The materials include a range of leveled texts to use with students in small group instruction each week. The leveled texts contain a comprehensive Teacher's Edition to provide purpose and direction. Students have weekly opportunities throughout the year to practice oral reading (with teacher modeling and guidance) incorporating rate, accuracy, and expression/prosody in the leveled readers. Students have the option of choosing a recorded voice to expressively read the text to them as words are highlighted.

Materials provide students practice to gain decoding automaticity and sight-based recognition of high-frequency words as well as reading fluency in oral reading.

Multiple opportunities are provided over the course of the year in core materials for students to purposefully read grade-level text. For example: 

  • In Unit 1, Week 5, Lesson 1, Reading Workshop, Realistic Fiction, pages T328-T329, the teacher introduces elements of realistic fiction text. The teacher instructs students to think about the purpose for reading realistic fiction, the main events, and details about the character’s problem while reading. The teacher models determining the purpose for reading realistic fiction. In the Student Interactive, page 164, students complete the Turn and Talk activity, discussing with a partner their reasons for reading You Can’t Climb a Cactus.
  • In Unit 2, Week 4, Lesson 2, Reading Workshop, Introduce the Text,  p. 270, the teacher introduces vocabulary for the text, What’s in the Egg Little Pip?, and explains that understanding the vocabulary helps with text understanding. In the Student Interactive, p. 344-365, students apply First Read Strategies when reading the text independently, in pairs, or as a class.

Multiple opportunities are provided over the course of the year in core materials for students to demonstrate sufficient accuracy, rate, and expression in oral reading with on-level text and grade level decodable words. For example: 

  • In Unit 2, Week 5, Lesson 2, Reading Workshop, Shared Read, Fluency, p. T367, the teacher reminds students that fluency is about reading words accurately at an appropriate rate. Students practice reading every word correctly by rereading paragraphs 7-9 aloud several times with a partner.
  • In Unit 3, Week 2, Lesson 2, Reading Workshop, Shared Read, Fluency, p. T133, the students practice reading with fluency by reading aloud paragraphs 14-19 several times with a partner. Students are instructed to read the dialogue with feeling, or prosody. Students read in a different voice for the old woman and the little girl to show their points of view.
  • In Unit 3, Leveled Readers, Learning About Traditions, the teacher states to the students that when they read, they should read at a speed that is not too fast.  The teacher explains that an appropriate rate makes the text easier to understand. The teacher models appropriate rate by reading an email in the text. Students read other emails in the text with a partner, with a focus on appropriate rate.
  • In Unit 4, Leveled Readers, Cool Clubs, the teacher states to the students that when they read they should read the words the author wrote. The teacher models a non-example by reading a text then adding, omitting, and replacing words in the passage. Students raise their hands when they hear the teacher is not reading what the author wrote. Students read a page to a partner, and the partner analyzes if the reader reads the author text accurately.
  • In Unit 5, Leveled Readers, Freeze Frame, the teacher states to the students that when they read, they are to look to the names of characters and emotions of the words used when characters are saying or doing something (i.e., said, cried, explained or asked) to help them know how to read the text with expression. The teacher models reading with and without expression. Students practice reading the sentences with expression. 
  • In Unit 5, Week 5, Lesson 1, Reading Workshop, Informational Text, p. 346, the teacher pairs up students and assigns an informational text from the classroom library. The students practice skills for accuracy and fluency. In the Student Interactive, p. 634, students partner read the same page to increase fluency and accuracy and help one another with challenging words.

Materials support reading of texts with attention to reading strategies such as rereading, self-correction, and the use of context clues. For example:

  • In Unit 1, Week 1, Lesson 2, p. 48, Reading Workshop, Close Read, Vocabulary in Context, the teacher explains that students can use words in a sentence to help identify the meaning of an unfamiliar word. In the Student Interactive, p. 32, students underline words that help to identify the word meaning.
  • In Unit 2, Week 3, Lesson 1, Reading-Writing Workshop Bridge, Academic Vocabulary, Context Clues, the teacher states to the students that context clues are words and pictures that can help them understand what an unknown word means. The teacher points out a sentence on the Student Interactive, then demonstrates a think-aloud showing the students how to use the words around the unknown word to understand its meaning. Students complete a worksheet on the Student Interactive where they circle words in a short passage that provide clues to new vocabulary words. 

Students have opportunities to practice and read irregularly spelled words. For example: 

  • In Unit 1, Week 4, Lesson 3, Reading Workshop, Word Work, Phonics:  Consonant Digraphs ch, sh, wh, th, ph, and Trigraph tch, page 254, the teacher reviews consonant digraphs and trigraphs. Students name consonant digraphs and trigraph while the teacher writes them. Students name some words with the digraphs or trigraph. Teacher models how to make a word web for consonant digraphs. Pairs of students draw a word web, write their assigned consonant digraph or trigraph in the center of the web and write as many words as they can around it. Partners share their webs and read words aloud. Partners choose two words from their webs and write two sentences, each using one of the words.
  • In Unit 2, Week 2, Lesson 3, Reading Workshop, Word Work, High-Frequency Words, the teacher tells the students that the high-frequency words of the week, including the word, kind, are words they will see often in text. The teacher writes the words on the board. Students come to the board, point to the high-frequency words, then say the word out loud. The students then write contextual sentences on the Student Interactive with the high frequency words of the week.

Indicator 1r

Materials, questions, and tasks provide systematic and explicit instruction in and practice of word recognition and analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected text and tasks.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria for materials, questions, and tasks providing systematic and explicit instruction in and practice of word recognition and analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected text and tasks.

Each week, students learn and apply word analysis and word recognition skills to connected text, decodable stories, and written tasks. This is done through the use of weekly Reading Workshop and Reading Writing Workshop Bridge instruction using teacher modeling, student collaborative practice, and the Student Interactive practice. Students have opportunities to read irregular words in the context of decodable readers. Students have weekly opportunities to decode and spell/write then apply the phonics skills to their work. 

Materials, questions, and tasks provide systematic and explicit instruction in and practice of word recognition and analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected text and tasks.

Materials support students’ development to learn grade-level word recognition and analysis skills (e.g apply spelling-sound relationship on common words, decode regularly spelled two-syllable words with long vowels, decode words. The following skills are taught: 

Distinguish long and short vowels when reading regularly spelled one-syllable words.

  • In Unit 1, Week 1, Lesson 2, Teacher-Led Options, Independent/Collaborative, Decodable Readers, students read the decodable reader, A Hot Job. The Reader contains short vowels.
  • In Unit 1, Week 2, Lesson 2, Teacher-Led Options, Independent/Collaborative, Decodable Readers, students read the decodable reader, Homes. The Reader contains CVCe words. 

Know spelling-sound correspondences for additional common vowel teams.

  • In Unit 3, Week 5, Lesson 2, Reading Writing Workshop Bridge, p. T390, the teacher reminds the students about vowel teams as digraphs (oo, ue, ew, ui). The teacher displays four words and models saying the words, underlining the sounds, repeating the sounds, and having the student spell the words. In the Student Interactive, p. 209, students practice completing 12 sentences by filling in the correct vowel team word from the list.
  • In Unit 5, Week 3, Lessons 4 and 5, Reading Workshop, Decodable Text, Read A Small Tree in a Big Wind, the teacher introduces a decodable reader by telling the students they will practice reading a story that contains the vowel patternsm aw, au, augh and al. The teacher points out two ways the sound /aw/ is spelled in words in the story. Students first read the test silently, then chorally with a partner.

 Decode regularly spelled two-syllable words with long vowels.

  • In Unit 2, Week 4, Lesson 2, Reading Workshop, Word Work, Phonics: Decode and Write Words with Long /e/, p. T256, the teacher reminds the students that a sound can be represented by different spellings (ee, ey, y). In the Student Interactive, p. 338, students write long /e/ words in sentences.
  • In Unit 4, Week 2, Lessons 4 and 5, Reading Workshop: Decodable Text, Read Spider's Web, the teacher models how to hear two vowel sounds in the word, spider, and that the first syllable contains a long vowel sound. The teacher asks the students where the word will break. Students tell the teacher the word breaks after the first vowel letter. Students orally read the word, then read the story.

Decode words with common prefixes and suffixes.

  • In Unit 1, Week 5, Lesson 2, Reading Workshop, Word Work, Phonics: Decode Words with Inflected Endings -s, -es, -ed, -ing, p. T320, the teacher writes sentences and models decoding the words with inflected endings. In the Student Interactive, p. 161, students decode words with inflected endings and tell their meanings in pairs.
  • In Unit 3, Week 2, Lesson 3, Reading Workshop, Word Work, Phonics: Review Comparative Endings, p. T98, the teacher reminds the students that the suffix is added to the base word to show comparison. The teacher models with three words adding the suffix and the students decode. The students work in pairs to play a card game to practice using the base word with adding -er and -est, reading and using the word in a sentence.
  • In Unit 4, Week 3, Lessons 4 and 5, Reading Workshop, Decodable Text, Read A Place to Play, the teacher explains that the students will read a decodable text that contains words with suffixes. After the students have read and reread the story, the teacher models by saying how s/he can "hear and see the suffix -er on the word leader." The teacher points out the base word, then asks students to talk about what the word with its suffix means. The teacher repeats the activity with another word with a different suffix. The students identify then orally read words from the story with suffixes.

Identify words with inconsistent but common spelling-sound correspondences.

  • In Unit 5, Week 3, Lesson 1, Reading Workshop, Word Work, Phonics:  Decode Words with Vowel Sound Spelled aw, au, augh, al, p. T180, the teacher displays sound-spelling cards 56, 57, 58, and 106. The teacher reads the words, audience, daughter, hawk, and chalk, and explains the different spellings for the /aw/ sound. In the Student Interactive, p. 550, the teacher guides students in identifying the vowel sound in law and how it is spelled. Students read words in the chart and listen for the vowel sound in each word. Partners reread the words in the chart and underline the letters that make the vowel sound. Students choose one word from each spelling pattern and use it in a sentence.
  • In Unit 5, Week 3, Lesson 4, Reading Workshop, Decodable Text, Read A Small Tree in a Big World, p. T186, the teacher introduces a decodable text in the Student Interactive, p. 553, and asks the students to look for the letter pattern, aw, au, augh, al. The students read the text silently and then with a partner. After reading, the teacher asks the students to identify the words from the text with certain letter sound patterns.

Materials provide frequent opportunities to read irregularly spelled words in connected text and tasks. The following skills are taught:

Recognize and read grade-appropriate irregularly spelled words

  • In Unit 3, Week 1, Lesson 3, Reading Workshop, High-Frequency Words, p. T27, the teacher explains that some words are not spelled the way they sound. The teacher explains that one needs to look closely at these words. The teacher has the students write down the words, eyes, earth and thought. After the students write the words, they read them out loud to a partner. The students then complete a worksheet where they insert the words into contextual sentences.
  • In Unit 4, Week 1, Lesson 2, Teacher-Led Options, Independent/Collaborative, Decodable Reader, p. T63, the teacher shows the students the high-frequency words from the week's lesson and reminds students they will practice reading them in the story. Students read the decodable story, Talent Show, containing the high-frequency words, sometimes, mountains and young, twice with a partner.
  • In Unit 5, Week 1, Lesson 2, Teacher-Led Options, Independent/Collaborative, Decodable Reader, p. T61, the teacher shows the students the high-frequency words from the week’s lesson and reminds students they will practice reading them in the story. Students read the decodable story, A Goose in Need, containing the high-frequency words, heard, door, and sure.

Lessons and activities provide students many opportunities to learn grade-level word recognition and analysis skills while encoding (writing) in context and decoding words (reading) in connected text and tasks. For example: 

  • In Unit 1, Week 5, Lesson 3, Reading Workshop, Spelling: Spell Words with ar, or, ore, oar, the teacher explains the letter combinations for ar. Students complete Spelling on p. 28 from the Resource Download Center, which requires students to write the word that belongs to each clue in a sentence.
  • In Unit 2, Week 1, Lesson 3, Reading Workshop, High-Frequency Words, p. T27, the teacher reviews high-frequency words of the week (different, between, even). The teacher uses short sentences to have students identify, read, and spell words. In the Student Interactive, p. 221, students identify, read, and write the high-frequency words in each sentence. Partners write this week’s high-frequency words in a list and read them to each other several times.
  • In Unit 4, Week 4, Lesson 2, Reading Workshop, Word Work, Phonics: Decode and Write Words with Prefixes un-, re-, pre-, dis-, p. T266, the teacher reviews how to decode words with prefixes, un-, re-, pre-, and dis-, and  displays words with prefixes. The teacher leads students in saying the prefix, word, and meaning. Students complete this process with remaining words. Students write sentences using each word. In the Student Interactive, p. 367, students decode words with prefixes in sentences and the word’s meaning.

Indicator 1s

Materials support ongoing and frequent assessment to determine student mastery and inform meantingful differentiantion of foundational skills, including a clear and specific protocol as to how students performing below standard on these assessments will be supported.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria for materials supporting ongoing and frequent assessment to determine student mastery and inform meaningful differentiation of foundational skills, including a clear and specific protocol as to how students performing below standard on these assessments will be supported.

The materials include formative and summative assessments in phonics and high-frequency words. Materials include three teacher manuals that help support the teacher in determining progress for students: Assessment Guide, Progress Check-Ups Teacher Manual, and Summative Assessments Teacher’s Manual. Within the manuals and the Teacher Edition, there is weekly support for teachers in using assessment results to inform instruction and remediation. There is weekly support for adjusting instruction for students below and above grade level. There is weekly support for the teacher to adjust instruction or reteach concepts to English Language Learners. The Small Group Guide provides fluency strategies and information about how to utilize assessment data to form groups and use data to drive instruction. Teachers are guided to assess students through observation and conferring, formal assessments, samples of student work, and informal progress checks. Formative assessments are provided in Quick Check, Assess and Differentiate, Assess Prior Knowledge, Assess Understanding, Observational Assessments, Conferring Checklists, and Rubrics. Cold reads allow student’s progress to be tracked weekly using grade level reading passages for comprehension and fluency, accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression. 

Examples of materials that support ongoing frequent assessment to determine student mastery and inform meaningful differentiation of foundational skills include, but are not limited to:

Multiple assessment opportunities are provided over the course of the year in core materials for students to demonstrate progress toward mastery and independence of foundational skills. For example:

  • The online Grade 2 Baseline, Middle-of-Year, and End-of-Year Test, reads the directions and questions to the student. The Baseline allows the student to demonstrate foundational skills in phonics and high-frequency words.
  • The Middle-of-Year assessment allows the student to demonstrate foundational skills in high-frequency words and phonics. The following question is an example of a phonics question on the mid-year, grade-level test that includes 16 phonics questions such as the multiple choice questions: "Which word has the same sound as the long i in hike?" Answer choices: dip, drip, side.
  • The End-of-Year test allows the student to demonstrate foundational skills in high-frequency words and phonics. The following question is an example of a phonics question on this mid-year, grade-level test that includes 16 phonics questions: "Which word has the same sound as the long i in kite?" Answer choices: baby, kitten, pencil.
  • In Grade 2, Summative Assessments Teacher’s Manual with Student Reproducibles, there are fluency assessments. In the oral Fluency Checks, the teacher is provided the assessment passage and tools to check a student’s fluency. There are explicit instructions for the teacher on administering, scoring, and interpreting the fluency results. Fluency assessments are optional.
  • In Unit 2, Week 4, Lesson 2, Reading Workshop, Word Work, Formative Assessment Options, p. 257, students use strategies to decode long vowel /e/ words with the spelling, ee, ea, ey, y. Students can use the Student Interactive, p. 338, to read the word and identify the long vowel /e/ sounds or use letter tiles and create and decode long vowel /e/ words with the ee, ea, ey, y. The teacher will use this Quick Check to notice and assess the students ability to decode and write words with the long vowel /e/ spellings, then decide if students have understanding or struggles, then move into the appropriate small group instruction.
  • In Unit 3, Week 2, Lesson 4, Reading Workshop, Teacher Led Options, Fluency, the teacher works in a small group of 2-4 students. The teacher has students read orally to assess proficiency on reading rate and accuracy. The teacher uses the Fluency Progress Chart to note student performance.

Assessment materials provide teachers and students with information of students’ current skills/level of understanding. For example: 

  • In Unit 1, Week 4, Lesson 2, Reading Workshop, Assess & Differentiate, Teacher-Led Options, Fluency, Prosody, p, T280, the teacher selects two stanzas of a poems for students to take turns reading with appropriate phrasing and expression and models if needed. Students read pp. 19-24 in Unit 1, Week 4, Cold Reads for fluency assessment. The teacher uses the Fluency Progress Chart to track student progress.
  • In Unit 4, Week 5, Progress Check-Ups Online, students are read the directions and each question along with the answer choices. This online assessment is used to monitor student progress on standards learned each week. In this check, the student is assessed on phonics.
  • In Cold Reads for Fluency and Comprehension: Teacher's Manual with Student Reproducibles 2, How to Identify Miscues and Errors, the teacher is given explicit directions on how to code student errors including guidance on omissions, substitutions and insertions of words. Guidance is provided for how to code errors related to mispronunciation, hesitations, and self-corrections.

Materials support teachers with instructional adjustments to help students make progress toward mastery in foundational skills. For example: 

  • In Unit 2, Week 3, Lesson 2, Reading Workshop, Teacher-Led Options, ELL Targeted Support, p. T216, the teacher is provided activities for both emerging/developing students and expanding/bridging students. With emerging/developing ELL students, the teacher writes quickly and slowly and works with students to identify the word within the word. The teacher explains that these are words with affixes added. The expanding/bridging ELL students go through the text and find words ending in -ly and use the word within the word to determine the meaning.
  • In Unit 4, Week 2, Lesson 2, Reading Workshop, Word Work, Phonics: Decode and Write Words with Open Syllables V/CV, the teacher uses a Quick Check to determine if students are able to decode and write words with the open syllable V/CV pattern. "If students struggle, revisit instruction for Phonics in Small Group on pp. T142-144. If students show understanding, extend instruction for Phonics in Small Group on pp. T142-143."
  • In Unit 5, Week 2, Lesson 2, Reading Workshop, Teacher-Led Options, Intervention Activity, the teacher works with a small group of students in an intervention group. The teacher provides explicit instruction in multisyllable words with double consonants, a lesson that was already introduced to the whole class. The students identify words with the targeted pattern in connected text.

Indicator 1t

Materials, questions, and tasks provide high-quality lessons and activities that allow for differentiation of foundational skills.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria for materials, questions, and tasks providing high-quality lessons and activities that allow for differentiation of foundational skills, so all students achieve mastery of foundational skills.  

Differentiation opportunities are presented throughout the Kindergarten materials. There are numerous formats for small group instruction in every unit based on student needs. Example groupings include groups focused on leveled reader activities, one-on-one conferring groups, strategy groups, ELL Targeted Support groups, and intervention groups for students performing below grade level on learning objectives. For students below level, small group differentiated instruction occurs on a daily basis. For students at or above grade level, small group differentiated instruction occurs one to two times per week. The program materials include the Kindergarten myFocus Intervention Teacher’s Guide to target and address student intervention needs.

Instructional pacing of lessons is limited to 15 minutes per day, which is not sufficient in supporting students' mastery of grade-level foundational skills.

Materials provide high-quality lessons and activities that allow for differentiation of foundational skills to achieve mastery. For example: 

  • In Unit 2, Week 3, Lesson 1, Reading Workshop, Word Work, Phonological Awareness, Recognizes Changes in Words, p. T172, the teacher reminds students that each sound is important in a word. Changing a sound will change the word. The teacher tells students they can make new words by changing the middle sound or phoneme in a word. The teacher points to a picture of a pen. The teacher states the word and emphasizes /e/. The teacher points to a picture of pan. The teacher states the word and emphasizes /a/. The teacher says pan and pin. Student identify the different sounds. Students name a set of pictures in the Student Interactive, and students identify what sound changes. 
  • In Unit 4, Week 4, Lesson 2, Reading Workshop, Word Work, Phonics, Decode and Write Words with Prefixes un-, re-, pre-, dis-, p. T266, the teacher reminds the students prefixes change the meaning of a base word. The teacher displays unwise, unwell, rewind, precook, disagree. The teacher points to unwise. The teacher states, "This word has the prefix un-. I know the prefix un- means 'not.' So unwise means 'not wise'.” Students say the prefix, the word, and its meaning. The teacher points to the remaining words. Student identify the word by reading the prefix, reading the word, and saying the meaning. Students write sentences using each word.
  • In Unit 5, Week 2, Lesson 3, Reading Workshop, Word Work, High-Frequency Words, the students are reminded that high-frequency words are words students need to learn by remembering the letters. Students read the following words: become, across, during. The teacher states, “If I can recognize these words quickly as I’m reading, I can read more fluently. Using them in sentences is one way to help me remember them.” Students underline the high-frequency words in sentences. Students write their own sentence for each word. Students share their sentences with peers.

Materials provide guidance to teachers for scaffolding and adapting lessons and activities to support each student’s needs. For example: 

  • In Unit 1, Week 4, Lesson 2, Reading Workshop, Word Work, Formative Assessment Options, Quick Check, the teacher is prompted to answer the following question about students: "Are students able to decode and write words with the digraphs and trigraph? If students struggle, revisit instruction for Phonics in Small Group on pp. T278-279. If students show understanding, extend instruction for Phonics in Small Group on pp. 278-279."
  • In Unit 3, Week 3, Lesson 1, Reading Workshop, ELL Targeted Support, the teacher provides English Language Learners (ELLs) with extra practice with the week's new letter-sound correspondence. The teacher tells the ELLs to watch her mouth as the /er/ sound is stated. The students repeat the sound. The teacher then writes several words that contain the /er/ sound. The students say the words with the teacher.
  • In Unit 5, Week 2, Lesson 2, Reading Workshop, Word Work, Formative Assessment Options, Quick Check, the teacher is prompted to answer the following question about students: "Are students able to identify and write words with double consonants? If students struggle, revisit instruction for Syllable Patterns in Small Group or pp. T140-141. If students show understanding, extend instruction for Syllable Patterns in Small Group on pp. T140-141."
  • In myFocus Intervention Guide, Level C, Practice and Assess, Lesson 6, Vowel Teams ea, oo, ey, y, ie, ee, p. 56, the teacher reminds students that vowel sounds can be spelled different ways and that you can spell the short /e/ sound spelled ea. The teacher models the word head, isolating the short /e/ sound. The teacher guides students in practicing the vowel sound in the word together. Teachers extend practice by having students identify and pronounce other short /e/ words spelled ea.

Students have multiple practice opportunities with each grade level foundational skill component in order to reach mastery; however, little instructional time is included for students to practice to mastery. For example:

  • In Unit 2, Week 3, Lessons 4 and 5, Reading Workshop, Word Work, Phonics: Review Vowel Digraph ie, p. T178, the teacher reminds students that the digraph ie can stand for the long /i/ sound in pie or the long /e/ sound in field, writes words on the board with ie, says the words, and asks students what long vowel sound they hear in each. Students repeat words, identify the vowel sound, look back at p. 293 in the Student Interactive, choose three words with the ie digraph and write a sentence for each.
  • In Unit 2, Week 5, Lesson 4 and 5, Reading Workshop, p. 343, the student is provided Additional Practice of spelling of long vowel /o/ and /e/ irregularly spelled words and high-frequency words in the My Words to Know found in the Resource Download Center. The Resource Download Center is for teachers to provide extension exercises through reproducibles in phonics, high frequency words, decodable reader booklets, and spelling to support foundational skills.
  • In Unit 3, Week 1, Lesson 3, Reading Workshop, Foundational Skills, High-Frequency Skills, Minilesson, the teacher states that the target high frequency word is hard to remember and states that students should "look closely", then write it and read it out loud. The students write the word and read it to their partner. Two additional high frequency words are written and read by the students. In Turn, Talk and Share, the students complete a worksheet in the Student Interactive. Students read the target high-frequency words, then complete the sentences using the target words. In the Decodable Text, Read Rabbit's Kite, the students read a decodable text with the same high-frequency words practiced in Reading Workshop earlier in the week. The students practice reading sentences from the decodable with a partner using prosody.

Gateway Two

Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

Meets Expectations

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Gateway Two Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the expectations for materials build knowledge through integrated reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language. The materials build students’ knowledge across topics and content areas and academic vocabulary instruction is intentionally and coherently sequenced to consistently build students’ vocabulary. Questions and tasks, at times, build in rigor and complexity to culminating tasks; however, students do not consistently need to use text evidence from the unit to complete the culminating tasks. Reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language skills are taught and practiced in an integrated manner. 


Criterion 2a - 2h

Materials build knowledge through integrated reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language.
28/32
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criterion for materials build knowledge through integrated reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language. Texts are organized around a topic/topics to build students’ ability to read and comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently. The materials contain sets of coherently sequenced higher order thinking questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language, key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts in order to make meaning and build understanding of texts and topics. The materials contain limited coherently sequenced set of text-dependent and text-specific questions and tasks that require students to build knowledge and integrate ideas across both individual and multiple texts. Questions and tasks support students’ ability to complete culminating tasks; however, culminating tasks do not always require students to use the texts read over the course of the unit. The materials include a cohesive, consistent approach for students to regularly interact with word relationships and build academic vocabulary/language in context. The materials contain a year-long, cohesive plan of writing instruction and practice which support students in building and communicating substantive understanding of topics and texts, and they include a progression of focused, shared research and writing projects to encourage students to develop and synthesize knowledge and understanding of a topic using texts and other source materials. The materials also provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.

Indicator 2a

Texts are organized around a topic/topics to build students knowledge and vocabulary which will over time support and help grow students' ability to comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that texts are organized around a topic/topics to build students knowledge and vocabulary which will over time support and help grow students’ ability to comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently.

Texts are connected by a central topic that is appropriate for Grade 2. Texts build students’ knowledge, vocabulary, and the ability to comprehend complex texts across the school year. The Student Interactive helps to guide students through the close read process throughout the entire year. Over the five units, central topics include You Are Here, Nature’s Wonders, Our Traditions, Making a Difference, and Our Incredible Earth. The units are designed to build knowledge and vocabulary and become more rigorous as the year progresses.

Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 2, the theme is Nature’s Wonders. This unit focuses on the patterns found in nature. In Week 1, Lesson 1, the read-aloud, Patterns on the Prairie, tells about patterns in nature and helps students start to visualize where they may see patterns. The Leveled Readers for this week also emphasize patterns with the titles, Nature’s Patterns, The Monarch Butterfly, and Amazing Migration. These books tell about physical patterns, as well as cyclical life patterns.
  • In Unit 3, the theme is Our Traditions. This unit builds knowledge about what makes a tradition and includes examples of traditions around the world. Week 3, Lesson 1 begins the week with a read-aloud of a traditional tale or folktale titled The Princess and the Peanuts. This week also incorporates other folktales in the Leveled Readers: The Crafty Fox, Weighing and Elephant, and The Greedy Dog.  The shared reads ask students to compare two versions of the traditional Cinderella tale, Interstellar Cinderella and Cendrillion: An Island Cinderella. In Week 4, Lesson 2, the shared read, Abenaki, is an informational text that introduces the Abenaki people and their traditions.
  • In Unit 4, the theme is Making a Difference.  This unit introduces students to why connecting with other people is important. The theme revolves around building relationships to make life easier and more interesting because everyone makes a difference in their own way. In Week 3, Lesson 1, the read-aloud text, Making a Difference in Your Community, fits the theme of making a difference and introduces the topic to students for listening comprehension. Students continue to develop the topic with the shared read, The Garden of Happiness, which is about members of a community coming together to grow a garden. In Week 5, Lesson 1, the read-aloud is titled Volunteering Helps Everyone, which shows the important ways people can make a difference by volunteering. There is also an expository text in the leveled readers about helping the community. The shared read text is titled Kids Can Be Big Helpers and shows ways even kids can make a difference in their community.
  • In Unit 5, the unit theme is Our Incredible Earth and the Essential Question is “How does Earth change?” The following shared reading texts and Essential Questions connect to the theme: Week 1, Introducing Landforms with the Weekly Question: “What are some of Earth’s changing features?”; Week 2, excerpts from How Water Shapes the Earth and How Earthquakes Shape the Earth with the Weekly Question: “How do natural events change Earth?”; Week 3, Where Do They Go in Rain or Snow? with the Weekly Question: “How does weather change Earth?”;  Week 4, Volcano Wakes Up! with the Weekly Question: “How does a volcano eruption change Earth?”; and Week 5, Rocks! with the Essential Question: “What can rocks reveal about how Earth changes?”

Indicator 2b

Materials contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language (words/phrases), key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts in order to make meaning and build understanding of texts and topics.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that materials contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language (words/phrases), key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts in order to make meaning and build understanding of texts and topics.

Over the course of the year, students analyze the author’s words and phrases, key ideas, details, craft, and structure as they interact, both individually and in large/small groups, with texts through questioning or by performing different tasks. Questions and tasks are sequenced to build students’ understanding gradually through each text and topic. By the end of each unit, questions and tasks become increasingly more complex and rigorous. 

Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Week 1, Lessons 3 and 4, Reading Workshop, Close Read, the teacher asks students a series of questions about the shared read How Many Stars in the Sky?: "Look at the illustrations. Where is the boy? What is the time of day? How do you know? Have students underline a sentence that describes the setting. The text tells us that there are 'lots of streetlights' in town. How does the writer describe the streetlights? (They are 'burning”'.) Ask: What does the city skyline look like? (It is 'bright'.) Point out the words drove and sleeping on p. 31 and help students think of related words. The words work together to paint a picture of the city. Underline the words that help you understand the meaning of the word dazzling. Teach students how they can use their knowledge of related words to determine the meaning of unfamiliar words. Have them list words for beamed and flashed. Display the following example from paragraph 22: 'The stars were so thick I couldn’t tell one from another.' Explain that figurative language lets readers use their own minds to make pictures of what they say. Do you think they will see the stars while they are in town? Why or why not? How does the boy feel about looking at the stars in town? How does the country differ from the city? Which setting lets the boy and his father see more stars? Why?"
  • In Unit 1, Week 3, Lesson 3, Reading Workshop, Close Read, students identify main idea. During the Whole Group lesson, students are introduced to the main or central idea of a title, paragraph, section, or of the entire text. On page 100 of the Student Interactive, students “Underline the words that tell you the main idea of the text.” On page 119 of the Student Interactive, students return to the text to find main idea and supporting evidence to complete a graph table. 
  • In Unit 2, Week 2, Reading Workshop, Close Read, students learn the features and structures of informational text. Students listen to The Art of Gardens and the teacher models how to determine if a text is an informational text. Students complete either of the following tasks: "1. Students work in pairs or in partners to describe a book or article they have read about an animal. Then students explain, 'What made the text informational? What kind of text features did it include?' 2. Students mark text features in an informational text they are reading. Then, they explain what makes the text informational, what facts they learned, and what text features they used."
  • In Unit 3, Week 3, Lesson 3, Reading Workshop, Shared Reading, students compare Interstellar Cinderella to the traditional Cinderella story. Then students complete either of the following tasks: "1. Students complete page 128 in the Student Interactive. Students identify the similarities and differences of Interstellar Cinderella to the traditional Cinderella story and Cendrillon: An Island Cinderella to the traditional Cinderella story. 2. Students compare and contrast two independent stories of the same genre using a chart similar to the one on page 128 in their Student Interactive."
  • In Unit 4, Week 4, Lesson 3, Reading Workshop, Close Read, students learn that informational text can be organized in chronological order. The teacher models how to annotate and identify the text structure of One Plastic Bag. Students then complete either of the following assignments: "1. Students annotate text to complete the chronological order chart in the Student Interactive page 398. 2. Students mark places in one of their independent reading texts where they notice time-order words or other clues that tell them the text structures. Students then write what those clues tell them about text structure."
  • In Unit 5, Week 5, Lesson 2, Reading Workshop, Shared Read, students continue to explore the main and central ideas. In this lesson, students are exposed to making inferences from a text. While reading the text, Rocks!, students scan paragraph 13 to infer the central idea of the section of text. On page 655 in the Student Interactive, students go back to the close read notes and make inferences about the main idea of each section using the table provided.
  • In Unit 5, Week 5, Lessons 3 and 4, Reading Workshop, Close Read, the teacher asks a series of questions about the shared read Rocks!: "Underline the sentences that help state the main idea of the first paragraph. Have students scan paragraph 5 and highlight the sentences that can help them figure out the main idea on this page. Have students scan paragraph 6 and underline the words that tell the meaning of crust in this section. Ask students what other meanings of crust they know. Have students scan paragraph 9 to find and highlight the sentences that can help them determine the main idea of this section. The author has supplied a cause (pressure from the rocks) and an effect (heat formation). Ask why the author might use cause and effect to explain rock formation. Have students scan paragraph 10 to find and underline the sentence that tells the main idea of this page. Have students scan paragraph 15 and underline the words in the text that help them understand the meaning of nutrients. Have students scan paragraph 16 and underline the main idea and topic."

Indicator 2c

Materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criteria that materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts.

The materials include sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that provide opportunities for students to analyze across multiple texts as well as within single texts. Each unit focuses around an Essential Question. Questions and tasks are provided in the materials during Shared Reading, Listening Comprehension, and Leveled Readers that build students’ understanding of the topic and prepare them to answer the Essential Question at the end of the unit. During Shared Reading, students complete a first read and close read of the text. At times, the close read includes questions and tasks that provide opportunities for students to build knowledge of a topic within and across texts; however, questions and tasks do not consistently provide opportunities for students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across individual and multiple texts and do not build in complexity or rigor

Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 2, students learn about the unit theme, Nature’s Wonders. The Essential Question for the unit is "What patterns do we see in nature?" In Week 2, Lesson 5, students compare A Home on a Prairie with the infographic, “Grassy Places.” They look for facts that are similar. Students answer a series of questions to build knowledge about the text and the infographic: "What facts do the infographic and A Home on the Prairie have in common? What facts are only found in one of the texts?"
  • In Unit 3, students learn about the unit theme, Our Traditions. The Essential Question is "What makes a tradition?" Throughout the unit, students listen to texts and answer questions that build towards answering the unit Essential Question. For example, Week 1, Lesson 5, the teacher states, “Today I want to remind you that comparing the morals of two or more traditional tales can help you better understand each tale. Notice which details in each tale help you identify the moral, and how those details are similar and different in different tales.” The teacher creates a three-circle Venn diagram and students help to fill in the diagram with similarities and differences among the details and morals in Fables. Later in Week 3, Lesson 5, students compare and contrast one of the Cinderella stories with another folktale or story they read in their self-selected independent-reading texts.
  • In Unit 4, students learn about the unit theme, Making a Difference. The Essential Question is "Why is it important to connect with other people?" Students listen to texts and answer questions throughout the unit that build towards answering the Essential Question. For example, in Week 4, Lesson 2, students listen to “What is the Story of Our Flag” and underline the sentence that describes the look of our first flag. Students are then asked why they chose that sentence. This information will later be used to compare two texts about flags. Students are also asked to highlight details in the story about how the flag has changed over time.
  • In Unit 5, students learn about the unit theme, Our Incredible Earth. The Essential Question is "How does earth change?" Students listen to texts and answer questions that integrate knowledge throughout the unit. For example, in Week 2, Lesson 5, Reading Workshop, students compare and contrast the infographic with the information about the Grand Canyon in How Water Shapes the Earth. Students look for things that are similar and different between the two texts. 

Indicator 2d

The questions and tasks support students' ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic (or, for grades 6-8, a theme) through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criteria that the questions and tasks support students’ ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic (or, for grades 6-8, a theme) through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).

Culminating tasks provide students with some opportunities to demonstrate comprehension and knowledge of a topic or topics. Earlier questions and tasks provide the teacher with some usable information about student’s readiness to complete culminating tasks; however, culminating tasks do not always require students to demonstrate their knowledge of a topic through integrated skills. At times, students students can complete tasks without using knowledge learned from the texts they listened to during Reading Workshop and are often an extension of what they are learning.

Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Week 6, Culminating Project, students write a persuasive paragraph about their favorite place in their community. In the weekly launch for this tasks, students work on comparing across texts.  They turn, talk, and share: “Different Questions: Have students work in pairs to look back at weekly questions. Circulate as pairs discuss and answer these questions. Tell them to use their answers to answer the Essential Question. Prompt students to push their thinking further and ask follow-up questions with their partners.”
  • In Unit 2, Week 6, Lesson 1, Reading Workshop, Project-Based Inquiry, students learn about patterns in nature and will research patterns in tree bark during the week. There are research articles at three different Lexile levels to differentiate instruction. Students follow a Tree Bark Research Plan to keep on track. Their real life assignment is that “a kindergarten teacher wants you to share facts about tree rubbings with her class. Make tree rubbings and write a fact sheet to share with the kindergarten class. Point out facts about the patterns in the bark.” In Lesson 2, students conduct research using books or online sources. In Lesson 3, students write a fact sheet, and in Lesson 4, make a poster with images and revise and edit their fact sheets. In Lesson 5, students present their fact sheets and posters. Some examples of questions/tasks the teacher uses to support students’ with their projects include:
    • If students have difficulty identifying patterns in nature, provide images of natural objects to look at and discuss. Provide examples as needed, such as:  “A zebra’s stripes go black, white, black, white and so on. A bee’s hive is made up of shapes called hexagons.” 
    • Before students move on to the Conduct Research page, check their understanding of informational texts by asking them to write or tell what their fact sheet is about and what details they plan to use to support this topic.
    • If students struggle to use the Revise checklist, reteach the concept of presenting a fact and then providing a supporting detail.
  • In Unit 3, Week 6, Lessons 1-5, Reading Workshop, Project-Based Inquiry, students learn about traditions and “write letters to the principal about traditions they think the school should celebrate or recognize.” The students read the article, “A Tradition to Remember,” to get background knowledge. The teacher models opinion writing using a mentor text and then students begin their research using websites. The teacher and students analyze a student model and read the article, “Birthdays Around the World.” Students continue researching and then write their opinion letter and revise and edit it. On the final day, students present their time capsule items to the class. Some examples of questions/tasks the teacher uses to support students’ with their projects include:
    • Offer questions to help students think about their audience, such as: “What do you think would convince your principal to take on the tradition you present? Why? What interesting facts can support your opinion?”
    • To demonstrate understanding of the information they have gathered, have students explain the topic and key ideas from each source. Then, have them use the sources and information to answer the questions.
    • Check in with students as they write their opinion letters. Use sentence frames or stems to assist struggling writers.
    • If students struggle, review the Student Model, pointing out where the opinion is in the first sentence, where the opinion words are, and where the linking words are.
  • In Unit 4, Week 6, Lessons 1-5, Reading Workshop, Project-Based Inquiry, students learn about making a difference and are going to create a time capsule and “write letters to themselves about the time capsule project.” The students read the article, “Time Capsules,” to get background knowledge. The teacher models informational writing using a mentor text. Students begin their research using web sites. The teacher and students analyze a student model and read the article, “Connecting for a Cause.” Students continue researching, and finally write their letter and then revise and edit it. On the final day, students present their time capsule items to the class. Some examples of questions/tasks the teacher uses to support students’ with their projects are:
    • Offer questions to help students think about their audience, such as: “What do you think people from the future would want to know about students from our time period? What interesting items might inform people from the future about them? How will people in the future react to the items?”
    • Check students’ understanding of time capsules and informational writing by having them state why they included each time capsule item.
    • If students struggle with the format of a letter, create a template for them to fill in with space next to each section of the note.
  • In Unit 5, Week 6, Lessons 1-5, Project Based Inquiry, students “create a TV infomercial that persuades the audience to agree with their opinions about the most exciting way Earth changes.” During this project, students revisit the literacy skill or strategies of identifying and applying the characteristics of persuasive text, evaluate details to determine key ideas, distinguish between fact and opinion, recognize characters of multimedia and digital texts, generate questions for inquiry, gather information from multiple sources, and identify and apply the characteristics of informational text. 

Indicator 2e

Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts. 

The materials provide teachers guidance outlining a cohesive year-long vocabulary development component in the Reading Workshop and the Reading-Writing Bridge. The vocabulary taught in the Reading Workshop comes directly from the anchor text read for the week. The vocabulary taught in the Reading-Writing Bridge focuses on academic vocabulary, such as context clues, antonyms, and related words. Vocabulary is repeated in contexts (before texts, in texts) and across multiple texts. Attention is paid to vocabulary essential to understanding the text and to high value academic words. Students are supported to accelerate vocabulary learning with vocabulary in their reading, speaking, and writing tasks. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Week 2, Reading Workshop, Leveled Reader, the teacher introduces the text, Amazing Migrations, and introduces and then reinforces the story vocabulary words (cycle, route, survive) before and after reading. During and after reading the teacher leads the discussion and has students use context clues to determine the meaning of route. Students compare how gray whales and whooping cranes are alike and different. Students write to answer the prompt: “Imagine you could travel with one of these animals while it migrates. Which one would you pick? Why?”

During the discussion and the writing, there are many opportunities to use the story vocabulary.

  • In Unit 1, Week 5, Lesson 2, Shared Reading, students read You Can’t Climb a Cactus. The teacher explains that “authors choose vocabulary to describe key plot elements. The vocabulary words excited, favorite, tour, guide, and explore help describe the main events in the plot.” The teacher tells students to "Remind yourself of the word’s meaning. Ask yourself what the author is trying to describe about events in the plot." Students are asked to complete one of the following tasks: "1. Students complete the chart on page 182 of the Student Interactive by using a dictionary to find the meaning and pronunciations, meaning, and related words. 2. Students use a dictionary to define words they are unfamiliar with in their independent reading. Then have them write the definitions on sticky notes and stick them near the word in the text."
  • In Unit 2, Week 3, Lesson 2, Shared Reading students read The Seasons of Arnold’s Apple Tree. The teacher explains that “authors use action words and words with affixes to describe events. Words that end in -ly, for example, describe how actions are done. The vocabulary words rustle, glow, and decorates describe actions in The Seasons of Arnold’s Apple Tree. The author uses the vocabulary words carefully and quietly to tell how actions happen.” The teacher tells students to "Remind yourself of the word’s meaning. Ask yourself what the author is trying to say about an action in the text." Students are asked to complete one of the following tasks: "1. Students complete the assignment on page 322 in the Student Interactive by underlining the words that end in -ly and completing each sentence. 2. Students make a list of -ly words from their independent texts. Then the teacher will prompt them to figure out the meaning of each of these words. Students will write the definitions in their reading notebooks."
  • In Unit 2, Week 4, Lesson 1, Reading-Writing Bridge Workshop, students use academic vocabulary for the unit (behavior, design, evidence, identify, similar) in a lesson on suffixes. The teacher explains that suffixes are word parts added to the end of a word and may give clues to the words meaning. Students complete a page in the Student Interactive to show understanding of suffixes using academic vocabulary. The glossary in the Student Interactive gives definitions in student-friendly language. 
  • In Unit 5, Week 2, Lesson 1, Reading Workshop, the teacher uses the weekly vocabulary words (destroy, environment, reaction, balance, and resources) when discussing and questioning students about the infographic. In Lessons 3 and 4, the vocabulary is discussed again through teacher questioning during the close reading of the shared reading text. For example, “How do the poems in Volcano Wakes Up! Tell about the environment? What is the reaction to the ferns in the poem ‘Ferns’ to the volcano sleeping?” During the Lesson 5, Compare Texts, the teacher again provides oral practice of the vocabulary words during questioning when connecting to the Weekly Question. In Week 1, Lesson 1 of the Reading-Writing Workshop Bridge, students review the academic vocabulary and then practice adding prefixes to them. Then they complete a prefix activity with their words in their Student Interactive. 
  • In Unit 3, in the shared reading text, My Food, Your Food, a teaching point provided for the teacher includes: "Use the Academic Vocabulary lesson on page T386-T387 in the Reading-Writing Workshop Bridge to remind students to use the vocabulary terms to talk about the text. Point out the academic vocabulary word belief on page 193. Explain: 'Sometimes, people choose to eat or not eat certain foods because of their religious beliefs.' Ask: 'How can people’s beliefs affect the food they eat?' Encourage students to use academic vocabulary in their responses."
  • In Unit 4, Week 5, Lesson 2, of Shared Reading students read Kids Can Be Big Helpers. The teacher explains that “when they encounter a new word, they might not know how to pronounce it. Remind them that a dictionary can tell them both the meaning of the word and how to pronounce it.” Students are asked to complete one of the following tasks: "1. Students complete the assignment on page 432 in the Student Interactive by using a dictionary to define and pronounce newly acquired vocabulary from Kids Can Be Big Helpers. 2. Students find and list unfamiliar words from their independent-reading texts. Then students use a dictionary to find the definitions and how to pronounce the words."
  • In Unit 5, Week 3, Lesson 2, the Minilesson focus for the teacher is to explain that authors choose words carefully to convey precisely what they want to say: "Help students internalize the meanings of the vocabulary words by finding words they already know that have similar meanings. In the model and practice: Direct students’ attention to page 574 in the Student Interactive. Model completing the first term: 'I know from both the context clues and from the hint given beneath the blank that I am looking for a word that means 'stay alive.' As I look at the vocabulary words, survive seems to fit the best. I check its meaning to confirm that I am correct.'”

Indicator 2f

Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan to support students' increasing writing skills over the course of the school year, building students' writing ability to demonstrate proficiency at grade level at the end of the school year.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that materials contain a year long, cohesive plan of writing instruction and tasks which support students in building and communicating substantive understanding of topics and texts. 

The materials contain well-designed lesson plans, models, writing rubrics, and protocols for teachers to implement and monitor students’ writing development. Students are supported through the writing process with mentor texts, models, and shared writing. Feedback is provided by peers, the teacher, and self-evaluations to ensure that students' writing skills are increasing throughout the year.  Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Weeks 1-5, Writing Workshop, students learn about a variety of genres. In Week 1, students write a variety of genres to build excitement of writing. In Week 2, students plan and revise ideas in their writing notebook. In Week 3, students explore and apply features of fiction and nonfiction, and they think about ways to publish their writing. In Week 4, students improve their drafts by employing appropriate punctuation, adding details to make their writing more interesting, and deleting unnecessary words and sentences. In Week 5, students revise their writing with the aid of peer feedback, produce a final draft, and celebrate the publication of their work.
  • In Unit 2, Weeks 1-5, Writing Workshop, students learn the elements of list articles. In Week 1, students write about subjects that interest them, include pertinent details, and discuss their writing with peers. In Week 2, students write informational texts that include a main idea, supporting details, and graphic features. In Week 3, students will consider how to present their ideas within the structure of standard informational text. In Week 4, students revise their informational list articles using proper language conventions and share their revisions with peers. In Week 5, students finalize their informational list articles, edit them for standard grammar, usage, and mechanics, and publish or present their list articles.
  • In Unit 3, Weeks 1-5, Writer’s Workshop, Week 1, students learn about poetry and begin writing a poem. In Week 2, students add imagery to their poems. In Week 3, students practice similes and alliteration and work on adding to their pieces. In Week 4, students revise their poems adding descriptive adjectives. In Week 5, students edit their poems, write their final draft, and read it to the class. Students then have a poetry assessment where they write a poem to a prompt.
  • In Unit 4, Weeks 1-5, Writing Workshop, students learn the elements of personal narratives. In Week 1, students plan, write, and finalize a well-developed personal narrative with the help of peer feedback. In Week 2, students draw on personal experiences to develop narratives that include a setting, problem, and its resolution. In Week 3, students continue to write a personal narrative and make revisions with the help of peer feedback. In Week 4, students edit and make revisions with the goal of crafting personal narratives that are clear, correct, and interesting to readers. In Week 5, students revise their personal narratives with particular attention to using correct language conventions and publish or present their narratives.
  • In Unit 5, Weeks 1-5, Writer’s Workshop, Week 1, students learn about how-to books and begin to plan their how-to books. In Week 2, students learn to write commands and make detailed directions for their writing. In Week 3, students give their writing a title, write an introduction and conclusion, write a list of materials, and organize their steps. In Week 4, students make revisions to their writing. In Week 5, students edit their how-to writing, publish and share with the class.

Indicator 2g

Materials include a progression of focused research projects to encourage students to develop knowledge in a given area by confronting and analyzing different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and source materials.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that materials include a progression of focused, shared research and writing projects to encourage students to develop knowledge and understanding of a topic using texts and other source materials.

The materials include research projects that are sequenced across the school year.  Each unit ends with Week 6 as an Inquiry Project. Students research a real-world issue through this project and are asked to demonstrate their learning across the unit, providing the opportunity to demonstrate what they know and are able to do, in speaking and writing. Research articles are provided on each topic at three different reading levels to support teachers and students in the research process.  Materials provide opportunities for both short and long writing projects. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Week 6, Project-Based Inquiry, students read differentiated research articles about exploring museums. Working in partners, they discuss what they are reading using sentence stems provided by the teacher to lead discussions. The teacher introduces persuasive writing using models and tells students they will write a persuasive paragraph about a favorite place in their community. Students are encouraged to begin their research by interviewing a community member about their favorite place in the community. Students then learn about using primary and secondary resources and using both print and digital resources. They are guided through the research process answering questions in their Student Interactive and teacher modeling.  Students revise and edit and finally, present their persuasive paragraphs to the class.
  • In Unit 2, Week 6, Lesson 1, Inquiry Project, students research patterns in tree bark to write an informational fact sheet. In Lesson 1, students are taught how to do a tree rubbing and generate research questions on the topic of tree bark patterns. In Lesson 2, students learn the characteristics and structure of informational text, about opinions, facts, and how to conduct research using print and digital resources to answer the questions they generated. In Lesson 3, students learn the difference between plagiarizing and paraphrasing. In Lesson 4, students create posters to represent their informational fact sheet, revise, and edit their writing. In Lesson 5, students share their persuasive text with the class and reflect on their projects.
  • In Unit 4, Week 6, Lesson 1, Inquiry Project, students collect personal items in order to create a time capsule and to write letters to themselves about the time capsule. In Lesson 1, students generate questions to ask themselves for the time capsule. In Lesson 2, students learn the characteristics and structure of informational text and conduct research using electronic resources. In Lesson 3, students begin writing their time capsule lists and learning about primary and secondary sources. In Lesson 4, students begin writing the letter to themselves about the time capsule, revise, and edit their writing to include more details. In Lesson 5, students share their informational text with the class and reflect on their projects.
  • In Unit 5, Week 6, Lessons 1-4, Reading Workshop, Project-Based Inquiry, students learn about the Earth and write a “persuasive infomercial about Earth.” Students are introduced to the project and then read a research article, “The History of Advertising.”  They develop a research plan for the week with assistance. In Lesson 2, the teacher uses a mentor text to model argumentative writing and then students conduct research using books or online sources. Sentence frames are provided for students needing extra support. In Lesson 3, an example of an infomercial script is provided and analyzed together as a model using the Student Interactive. In Lesson 4, students revise and edit their scripts and record the infomercial and share with the class on the final day.

Indicator 2h

Materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.

The materials provide procedures for independent reading, including an independent reading log and tracking system, included within the Student Interactive. The weekly reading plan includes daily opportunities for independent reading during small group and as a formative assessment option. Students are provided a wide variety of guided reading text that span the grade level. The teacher regularly provides supports through guided reading groups. The students may reread these texts independently throughout the week. 

Example include, but are not limited to: 

  • In Unit 1, Week 1, Lesson 1, Reading Workshop, Introduce the Unit, students learn about the independent reading log and how to select an independent reading book. This is found in the Student Interactive. The students fill out the date, book title, pages read, minutes read, and then rate the book with a smiley face, straight face, or a sad face.  Students are then directed to choose their own books for independent reading. According to the materials students should "Select texts by favorite authors, about interesting topics, or in a particular genre. Establish a purpose for reading self-selected texts. Spend increasing periods of time reading independently throughout the unit to build stamina."
  • In Unit 2, students are taught how to choose a book for independent reading in the Student Interactive, page 212. Students are taught to choose text by favorite authors, interesting topics, or certain genres. Students are also taught to establish a purpose for reading, and spend time reading at extended periods of time to increase stamina. On page 213 of the Student Interactive, there is a reading log for students to track their independent reading. In Week 1, Lesson 4, Reading Workshop, Ask and Answer Questions, students have the option to use sticky notes to mark places where they might have questions about the text and places that might provide answers to their questions during independent reading. During small groups on page T71 of the Teacher's Edition, students read a self-selected trade book. Students read or listen to previously read leveled reader or eText. Students continue to read their Book Club text.
  • In Unit 3, Week 4, Lesson 1:  Reading Workshop, Assess & Differentiate, Small Group, while the teacher is conferring with students, there are several Independent/Collaborative suggestions for students. Under the heading Independent Reading students can "Reread or listen to 'The Princess and the Peanuts' or a previously read leveled reader or eText. Read a self-selected folktale. Begin reading their Book Club text." This is a similar format for Independent Reading under the Assess & Differentiate, Small Group weekly plan throughout the school year.
  • In Unit 4, students are taught how to choose a book for independent reading in the Student Interactive, page 232. Students are taught to choose text by favorite authors, interesting topics, or certain genres. Students are also taught to spend time reading at extended periods of time to increase stamina. On page 233 of the Student Interactive, there is a reading log for students to track their independent reading. In Week 3, Lesson 2, Reading Workshop, Respond and Analyze, students have the option to create a list of unfamiliar words from their independent reading. Then students use a dictionary to look up each word and think of other words with similar meanings. During small groups on page T227 of the Teacher's Edition, students reread or listen to The Garden of Happiness. Students read a self-selected trade book or their Book Club text. Students will retell their independent-reading book to a partner.
  • In Unit 5, Week 3, Lesson 2, Reading Workshop, Shared Read, students use their Independent Reading books to list unfamiliar words from their reading and use context clues to determine the words’ meanings.

Gateway Three

Usability

Meets Expectations

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Gateway Three Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the expectations for instructional supports and usability indicators.  Although the materials are well designed, the pacing of daily lessons is not appropriate. The materials support teacher learning and understanding of the Standards, as well as offer teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards. Teachers are provided with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards. The materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, and digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms.

However, the overall web platform presents several navigational challenges and can be difficult to navigate when searching for resources or program components.

Criterion 3a - 3e

Materials are well designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing.
5/8
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criterion for materials are well designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing. Although the materials are well designed, the pacing of daily lessons is not appropriate to fit the instructional minutes of an English Language Arts block and allow for effective lesson structure. Student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids. The materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items. The visual design is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.

Indicator 3a

Materials are well-designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing.
0/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 do not meet the criteria that materials are well-designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing. 

Materials are well designed; however, the pacing of each daily lesson is not appropriate to fit the minutes of an English Language Arts block and allow for effective lesson structure. In the Getting Started Guide, times are listed for each component of these lessons and suggested instructional minutes for them. The lessons are sequenced to incorporate Reading Workshop, Reading and Writing Workshop Bridge, Small Group/Independent, and Writing Workshop. Materials also include a Suggested Weekly Plan that outlines instructional minutes for each section. Within the Reading Workshop portion, materials cover both foundational skills lessons as well as reading lessons with a suggested time of 10-20 instructional minutes. The content within these portions may need more instructional time to complete each day.

Each daily lesson format is broken apart into Reading Workshop, Writing Workshop, and Reading-Writing Bridge Workshop sections. Suggestions for instructional minutes are as follows:

    • Reading Workshop: 10-20 minutes (This includes foundational skills)
    • Reading-Writing Workshop Bridge: 5-10 minutes
    • Small Group/Independent: 20-30 minutes
    • Writing Workshop: 5-10 minutes
    • Independent Writing: 30-40 minutes
    • Reading-Writing Workshop Bridge: 5-10 minutes 

Indicator 3b

The teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criteria that the teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.

The materials are well designed; however, the pacing of individual lessons may not provide time for maximum student understanding. In the Getting Started Guide and Overview of the Curriculum, there are five units, each with six weeks of lessons, totaling 30 weeks of core new instruction. This time frame provides teachers with flexibility over the course of the year; however, core content within each daily plan may not reasonably be completed in the amount of time listed in the Suggested Weekly Plan. The lessons are sequenced to incorporate Reading Workshop, Reading and Writing Workshop Bridge, Small Group/Independent, and Writing Workshop. Materials also include a Suggested Weekly Plan that outlines instructional minutes for each section. Within the Reading Workshop portion, materials cover both foundational skills lessons as well as reading lessons with a suggested time of 10-20 instructional minutes. The content within these portions may need more instructional time to complete each day. Teachers may need to make instructional adjustments to ensure students had opportunities to work towards mastery of the core content, especially pertaining to foundational skills.

Indicator 3c

The student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (e.g., visuals, maps, etc.).
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that the student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (eg. visuals, maps, etc.)

The Student Interactive contains the student texts, as well as practice materials for all components of Reading and Writing Workshop. In addition, additional printable practice pages are available online. The student resources include ample review and practice resources in the Student Interactive. The directions are clear with explanations and correct labeling of resource aids. However, some response boxes in the consumable worksheets are not large enough to provide adequate space for students to respond.

There are two volumes for Grade 2. According to the Program guide:

  • The myView Literacy program contains online leveled reader support with ELL Access Videos to build background, as well as audio and word-by-word highlighting for student scaffolding.
  • Interactive graphic organizers and highlighting and note taking capabilities are included.
  • Sentence frames before, during, and after reading provide the language structures students need to incorporate academic language into their speech and writing (Language Awareness Online).
  • Additional practice, printable pages are available online.
  • Research articles are written at three different reading levels.

The materials contain many science and social studies topics. Content vocabulary is underlined and highlighted in blue in the text. The sidebars contain definitions of the vocabulary words to assist the reader. Clear, colorful photographs are also used to help students with these concepts. Directions are clear. When doing a close read of the shared reading text, the directions are in the margin on the page where students find the text evidence. Since the shared reading texts are all in the Student Interactive, students underline the text evidence directly on the shared reading text. For example, in Unit 2, Week 1, Lesson 3, Reading Workshop, Close Read, after reading A Green Kid’s Guide to Watering Plants, in the margin is the close read icon. Identify Text Structure is bolded. Students are directed to “Underline the words that tell what causes water to go to the roots.”  Visual aides such as maps, photographs, headings, bold words, glossary, and illustrations are correctly labeled. Examples of clear instructions include:

  • In Unit 1 of the Student Interactive p. 40, students complete the graphic organizer by writing the definition of the following compound words: treehouse, searchlights, daylight. The directions state, “use the shorter words to define each compound word. Write your definition. Then find each word in the story. Read the definition. Is your definition correct? Change it if you need to.”
  • In Unit 2 of the Student Interactive p. 246, students complete the graphic organizer to identify the steps to planting a garden. The directions state, “go to the Close Read notes in 'It’s Time to Plant!' Follow the directions to underline words that tell chronological order. Use the parts you underlined and other text evidence to complete the chart.”
  • In Unit 4 of the Student Interactive p. 496, students identify the key details from each subheading of Introducing Landforms. The directions state, go to the Close Read notes. Follow the directions to underline the text. Use the details you underlined to complete the chart."

Indicator 3d

Materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items.

The publisher has provided documentation of alignment with Common Core State Standards. Detailed information of where the standard is being practiced in the Student Interactive and Teacher's Edition are listed under the corresponding standard. The ten standards are divided into Literature, Informational, and Foundational Skills, Writing, Language, and Speaking and Listening. Detailed information of where the standard is being practiced in the Student Interactive and Teacher's Edition are listed under the corresponding standard in under Planning Resources for each grade level. There are specific standards-based assessments in each unit that include reading comprehension, high-frequency words, phonics, conventions, and writing. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 4, Week 2, Lesson 3, Reading Workshop, students learn how text features support the text. The specific questions that aligned to this standard is "What does illustrations tell me about the text?"
  • In Unit 4, Week 2, Lesson 3, Reading Workshop, students are asked to complete one of the following tasks: "1. Students explain the author’s purpose for including these illustrations. 2. Students use a graphic organizer to explain how text features help them understand the text, gain information, or locate information."

Indicator 3e

The visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that the visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.

The visual design of the materials is not distracting or chaotic. The Student Interactive contains the majority of the student materials, including the shared reading text. This is the primary resource used by students and it utilizes a consistent font and format throughout the book and units. The text and the photographs and illustrations/visuals support students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.

The Student Interactive is comprehensive and contains the shared reading text, as well as the practice pages for Reading Workshop, Writing Workshop, and Reading and Writing Bridge. These are available in both print and digital resources. The digital version appears to look the same as the print version of the materials. Digital materials also include videos and text with audio. The text highlights word-by-word while being read to support student engagement. The sections are color-coded for easily locating materials. Reading Workshop, Writing Workshop, and Reading and Writing Bridge, Small Group, and Project-Based Inquiry pages are color-coded for ease of navigating the materials. The materials contain many science and social studies topics. Content vocabulary is underlined in the text. The sidebars contain definitions of the vocabulary words to assist the reader. Clear, colorful photographs are also used to help students with these concepts.

The digital materials include a Teacher's Edition, Student Edition, the Student Interactive, assessments, trade books, book club books, audio/video resources, games, interventions, dual language resources, leveled readers, small group guides, anchor charts and mini lessons, text complexity charts, interventions, etc. All tabs are clearly labeled without any distracting images.

Criterion 3f - 3j

Materials support teacher learning and understanding of the Standards.
7/8
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criterion for materials support teacher learning and understanding of the Standards. The materials contain a Teacher's Edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the Student Edition and in the ancillary materials. While the Teacher’s Edition contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary, and it shows the progression of the content, the standards explanation in the context of the curriculum is not included or linked. The materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.  The materials also include strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program, as well as suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.

Indicator 3f

Materials contain a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that materials contain a teacher’s edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.

The Teacher's Edition contains many suggestions and examples on how to present content to students throughout the year. The unit and weekly format of the Teacher's Edition follows a structured routine throughout the year for each grade level. The materials provide teachers with ample annotations to model skills and strategies through teacher think alouds. Teacher support is also provided for the use of embedded technology to support student learning. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • The Teacher's Edition provides a unit overview, as well as a weekly overview and a suggested weekly plan to aid in lesson planning. Teachers can use the Weekly Hyperlinked Planner to make planning lessons easier. 
  • At the beginning of each Unit, there is a Program Overview section. Within the Program Overview section, the Program Components section lists the the print and digital resources. The Instructional Model is included in the Program Overview, and an  explanation is included for how the Reading Workshop, Reading-Writing Bridge, Writing Workshop, and Project-Based Inquiry Project fit together. In the Program Overview, there is a section for each model: the Reading Workshop Instructional Model, the Reading Workshop Small Group Instructional Model, and a Writing Workshop Instruction Model. These sections explain how the Unit of Study is separated, list resources, and the include Weekly Plan/Objectives. The Program Overview section also explains the Reading-Writing Bridge and the Project-Based Inquiry section. The assessments are explained in the Assessment Overview. Guidance is included for teachers to use with ELL students, struggling students, and accelerated students.
  • In Getting Started, Program Overview: Reading Workshop Minilesson, Focus On Strategies , teacher instructions state, “Lead a discussion to help students recognize major characteristics of informational text. Explain that to understand an informational text, readers must be able to recognize the text’s main, or most important, idea and key details. Readers should also look for domain specific vocabulary, text features, graphic features, and a recognizable text structure.”
  • Model and Practice instructions state, “Model determining whether ‘Shoes and Hands Across the World’ is a biography. I want to figure out if this text is a biography. Yes, this text is about Blake Mycoskie. Next, are the events real events? Yes, I see the text is about the man founded a famous shoe company that helped millions of people. Next, I’ll check to see if the text tells events in time order. Yes. First, Blake developed a shoe. Next, he found someone to sell it. Last, he sold and donated thousands of shoes. All of these answers tell me that this is a biography. Group students. Give each group a text written in first person. Have students compare the pronouns used in ‘Shoes and Hands Across the World’ to the first-person text, and discuss how they know that one is a biography.”
  • The Language Awareness Handbook is an online resource that provides resources to scaffold instruction during reading and writing workshop. For example, sentence frames that can be used to help students include academic language in their reading and writing. Weekly lessons contain a launch video and student online text contains audio and word-by-word highlighting for student support.  In writing, teachers are provided with conference prompts to help focus instructional needs: “If students need additional support, then choose a personal narrative from the stack to review together and discuss its narrator, setting, and events.”

Indicator 3g

Materials contain a teacher's edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that materials contain a teacher’s edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.

The materials contain a Professional Development Center with videos and white papers that contain advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject. Professional Learning videos are provided to give teachers the research behind the series and enhance teaching practices. These materials are authored by the authors and researchers of the program.

Professional Learning videos are provided to give teachers the research behind the series and enhance teaching practices. The myView Literacy authors provide teachers with best practices. The Professional Development Tab contains full adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary. Categories provided include Assessment, Book Club, Comprehension & Assessment, Differentiation, Dual Language, Engagement, Foundational Skills, Inquiry, Reading, Small Group, and Vocabulary.

In Reading, there are four video offerings: “Isolated vs. Integrated Skills Instruction in Texts to Improve Comprehension,” “Organizing the Literacy Block and the Reading Workshop Part 1,” “Organizing the Literacy Block and the Reading Workshop Part 2,” and “What is Integrated Skills Instruction?” The White Papers included are: “Text Complexity Systems: A Teacher’s Toolkit” and “The Reading Workshop.”

In Vocabulary, there are two video offerings: “How to Start Teaching a Generative Vocabulary Approach” and “What is a Generative Approach to Vocabulary Instruction?” These videos are both authored by Elfrieda “Freddy” Hiebert, Ph.D.

Indicator 3h

Materials contain a teacher's edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criteria that materials contain a teacher’s edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.

The materials include a progression of content presented in the unit through the weekly plan.  Grade level standards are also addressed in the supplemental correlation standards chart. 

While the Teacher's Edition does show the progression of the content through the weekly focus guide and what each component of the block will detail as their focus for the week, the standards explanation in the context of the curriculum is not included or linked.  The teacher has to use the supplemental correlation standards chart to determine when/where the standards are being covered. Examples include, but are not limited to:

The Teacher's Edition contains a detailed scope and sequence reference (pages R22-R30).  The chart outlines everything for Grades K-5 and notes which skills are targeted at each grade level.  The chart breaks everything down by where the skills can be found: i.e. Reading Workshop includes foundational skills and reading comprehension. Each topic is then broken down further. For example, foundational skills includes print concepts, phonological awareness, phonics, high-frequency words, word structure and knowledge, and fluency. This break down allows for a simple reference to locate at what grade skills can be found while also giving context to the overall curriculum.

Standards are consistently referenced at the beginning of units, in each lessons’ clearly stated objectives, and in the assessments. Specifically, the assessment overview on pages xviii-xix give purpose for assessments to meet standards within the context of the overall curriculum.

The materials provide the specific lesson outline for when the standards are taught, however, resources do not reference the relationship or rationale for teaching the standards or how they will support the learner.  

CCSS correlation charts are provided for each grade level in the Getting Started resources online, however, these are not directly included in the Teacher's Edition.

Indicator 3i

Materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research based strategies.

The Teacher's Edition has explanations of instructional approaches and research-based strategies of the program. The program authors/advisory board are presented and have different quotes about components of the program/instructional approaches. The instructional model of the curriculum is explained in the Teacher's Edition for both the overall instructional structure of the block, but also the daily structure and focus. An explanation of the reading and writing workshop bridge also provides teachers with the knowledge of those research-based strategies. 

Within the online resources, a teacher can find professional development to guide the instructional approaches used in the curriculum.  Each topic has a short (approx. 3-5 minute) video explaining the approach that gives specific purpose and strategies for the topic. The videos are presented by experts in the field. Some topics also have presenter-created notes or articles detailing the research-based instructional approach with significant references.

Indicator 3j

Materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.

Information is available for teachers through the unit overview and weekly overview. The Assessment Guide includes letters that teachers can send home to parents and caregivers for each unit. These letters outline specifically what will be covered in each unit and provides suggestions for supporting student progress and achievement at home. These letters begin on p. 128 of the Assessment guide and are available in both English and Spanish.

Criterion 3k - 3n

Materials offer teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards.
8/8
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criterion for materials offer teacher resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards. The materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress. Assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized and they provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up. The materials include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress. The materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.

Indicator 3k

Materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress.

The materials include multiple, varied assessment opportunities throughout the curriculum to measure student progress. Students are assessed in all areas of reading and writing through the assessments presented in the curriculum. Teachers are able to assess students in a base-line, mid-year, and end-of-year assessment. Unit assessments are given to assess the standards addressed in that unit. Within each unit, teachers have access to give students weekly progress assessments. Cold read fluency passages are also used as an assessment monitoring tool for teachers on fluency and comprehension. Each unit also contains an end-of-unit project, during Week 6, which has a rubric for students to assess student progress. Writing workshop assessments are also offered in the curriculum. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • Summative Assessments
  • Baseline, Middle-of-Year, and End-of-Year Tests
  • Unit Tests
  • Cold Reads for Fluency and Comprehension
  • Customizable Digital Assessments
  • Inquiry-Based Project Rubrics and Checklists
  • Progress Check-Ups
  • Writing Workshop Assessments 

Through Examview, teachers can create Cold Reads, Progress Check-ups, and Unit Tests using questions from a bank or creating their own. Teachers can also choose from multiple choice, multiple response, and essays, or include all three. The program offers both English and Spanish. Additionally, teachers can monitor and track student progress within Examview.

The program also suggests gathering comprehensive assessment data to inform instructional pathways using embedded daily routines and digital/print assessment resources, such as quick checks, assess and differentiate, assess prior knowledge, assess understanding, observational assessments, conferring checklists, and rubrics. All of these provide ample opportunity to assess student progress in a genuine way.

Indicator 3l

The purpose/use of each assessment is clear:
0/0

Indicator 3l.i

Assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.

There are several forms of formative, summative, and unit assessments within the materials. The Summative Assessments Teacher Manual includes a standards correlation chart for the baseline, middle-of-year, and end-of-year assessments as well as for all unit tests that provides item analysis information for the teacher, including the item focus/skill, DOK level and which standard it measures.

The Assessment Guide states, “Pearson Realize allows teachers to view each student’s results of assessments taken online, and for assessments aligned to standards, they can see scores by question and by standard. Use the DATA tab of Pearson Realize to view results. Click or tap a bar in the Mastery bar chart to show details of that assessment. Choose the Item Analysis tab to see question level scores. Choose Mastery Analysis tab to see scores by standard.” 

In the Assessment Guide, Teacher Form, the Weekly Standards Practice details the “slides” to be presented to students that have formative assessments that are used as a measure of vocabulary, phonics, language, and conventions. Alignment of standards is presented at bottom of each slide. Under the ExamView, it also mentions that teachers can search/assign test questions by standard.

Indicator 3l.ii

Assessments provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that assessments provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow up.

The provided Assessment Guide is an extensive tool for teachers to provide support in interpreting student data and next steps in instruction.  There is a chart included that delineates the types of assessments in the program, examples, when the assessment should be administered, data type, and information regarding how to utilize the data.  Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • The Assessment Guide for Grades K-5 provides teachers with “ongoing professional development support to read and interpret data to drive instruction.” It is a 192 page document designed to support teachers with all types of student assessment throughout the school year. For example, there is a Reading Strategy Checklist, a teacher tool to monitor a student’s knowledge of reading strategies.  It is in rubric form with categories of Proficient, Developing, Emerging, and Not Yet. Each chapter has a case study example that ends with a teacher reflection, what’s next, and the take away.
  • Chapter 3 of the Assessment Guide is titled: Benchmark Assessment and Instructional Grouping. It begins with a case study and then guides the teacher: “What are guided reading levels and how are they used?” It helps to match readers with the correct myView Cold Read level for progress monitoring and has an If...Then chart to help teachers with grouping students. Students are grouped into Developing, On Level, and Advanced and given a suggested instructional focus for reading.
  • Questions are provided to guide teachers through the process of looking at data and deciding next steps in Chapter 4 of the Assessment Guide: "Is this student making progress in this small group? Do I need to regroup this student? Do I need to change the way I am instructing this student? Do I need to change the texts this student is reading?"
  • In the Writing Workshop section of the Teacher's Edition, there is a section called If...Then which is designed to guide the teacher when doing student conferencing during Writing Workshop: "If students need additional support, Then ask: Which word in a sentence do you always capitalize? If students show understanding, Then ask: Which capitalization rules will you use to help you edit your writing?"

Indicator 3m

Materials should include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that materials should include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress.

The Progress Check-Ups Teacher Manual contain routines, guidance, and progress monitoring tools for teachers to use to monitor students throughout the school year. Examples of the routines and guidance that is provided to teachers while conducting progress monitoring:

Description of the Progress Check-Ups

  • The High-Frequency Words section consists of three multiple-choice questions that assess students’ knowledge of the week’s high-frequency words. Teacher scripting is provided for each item.
  • The Phonics section consists of four multiple-choice questions that assess students’ knowledge of the week’s phonics skills. Answer choices are provided as pictures, so that students do not have to be able to read. Teacher scripting is provided for each item.
  • The Listening Comprehension section consists of a selection read aloud to students and three multiple-choice questions that assess students’ knowledge of the week’s comprehension focus. Answer choices are provided as pictures, so that students do not have to be able to read. Teacher scripting is provided for each item.
  • The Writing section consists of a writing prompt that asks students to draw and write or dictate in a particular writing mode. You may wish to record dictation provided by students.

The Assessment Guides states “Comprehension is assessed in most of the myView assessment products. The myView Progress Check-Ups, myView Cold Reads for Fluency and Comprehension, myView Unit Tests, myView Middle-of Year Test, and myView End-of-Year Test will help you determine progress in Comprehension on a weekly basis.” The materials also suggest taking running records of students. There are weekly word study lessons built into the program in the myView Reading-Writing Bridge. 

Chapter 4 of the Assessment Guide is titled, Ongoing Assessment. The chapter begins with a case study example concluding with teacher reflection, what’s next, and the take away. The materials suggest teachers do formative assessments throughout the school year. “Combined, your observations, running records, inventories, small-group conferences, and Weekly Progress Check-Up results will help inform your understanding of where your students are and how they are progressing.” The Guide also provides teachers with a chart of different types of questions to use for informal assessments that monitor student understanding and gives teachers a guide of what to do next: "If a student receives a low score on a Progress Check-Up or shows a lack of adequate progress during the year, use myFocus Intervention, Level A to provide the student with additional opportunities to practice high-frequency words, phonics, comprehension, and writing." This can be done through large-group, small-group, or individual instruction. Alignments between individual assessment items and lessons in myFocus Intervention are provided on the Item Analysis Charts.

Indicator 3n

Materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.

At the beginning of each unit, a reading log is introduced to hold students accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation. Students are accountable for independent reading using the reading log to record their independent reading. This reading log is found in their Student Interactive. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • Students are provided with a reading log in the Student Interactive at the beginning of each unit. They need to record the date, book, pages read, and minutes read. After reading, students rate the book by circling a happy, sad, or straight faced smiley face. In Introduce the unit, Independent Reading, students are directed to self-select texts and “spend increasing periods of time reading and interacting independently throughout the unit to build stamina.”
  • In Reading Workshop, Assess & Differentiate, Independent Reading, several teacher suggestions for independent reading are provided: "Reread the shared reading text. Read a self-selected trade book of text. Reread and/or listen to their leveled reader. Partner read a text, coaching each other as they read the book."

Students are provided with a choice during independent reading which should help to build stamina, confidence, and motivation. For example:

  • In Unit 1, teachers explain that students select their own texts to read independently. The teacher explains that students can select texts by favorite authors, about interesting topics, or in a particular genre. The teacher explains that students should set a purpose for reading self selected texts. Students spend increasing periods of time reading independently throughout the unit to build stamina.  Then students are directed to read page 10 in the Student Interactive. On page 11, there is a My Independent Reading Log where students record the date, title, pages read, and their rating of the book.
  • In Unit 3, teachers explain to students that they can select their own texts and read independently for longer and longer periods of time. The teacher tells students that they can select texts by favorite authors, about interesting topics, or in a particular genre. Students read independently for sustained periods of time to build stamina.  Then students are directed to read page 12 in the Student Interactive. On page 13, there is a My Independent Reading Log where students record the date, title, pages read, and their rating of the book. On page 12 of the Student Interactive Workbook, students are provided with four strategies for when they across an unknown word: "Sound out the word using what you know about letters and sounds. See if there is a base word that you know with an ending added to it. Look at the words and sentences around the word for clues to its meaning. When you think you know the word, reread the sentence with its meaning in mind. Am I reading to answer a question?"
  • In Unit 5, the teacher explains that students are to select a book that is neither too hard or too easy. The teacher tells students that they can select texts by favorite authors, about interesting topics, or in a particular genre. Students read independently for sustained periods of time to build stamina. Then students are direct to read page 462 in the Student Interactive. On page 463, there is a My Independent Reading Log where students record the date, title, pages read, and their rating of the book. On page 462 of the Student Interactive, students are taught how to review a book by answering the following questions: "What did I like about the book? What didn’t I like about the book? Did the book meet my purpose for reading? Overall, did I like this book? Would I suggest it to a friend?"

Criterion 3o - 3r

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards.
10/10
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criterion for materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards. The materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards. The materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade-level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards, while also regularly including extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level. The materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.

Indicator 3o

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.

The Teacher's Edition provides strong support for meeting the needs of all learners, including English Language Learners.

The Program Overview breaks down the support in the Teacher's Edition in Reading Workshop to include whole group lessons and small group lessons. These lessons are meant to differentiate and provide support to all students. The materials also focus on the three tiers of instruction. In small groups, leveled readers with lesson plans are included to support guided reading groups. There is a Leveled Reader Teacher's Edition, as well as a Small Group Guide to assist the classroom teacher. The Leveled Reader Teacher's Edition provides “possible teaching points for differentiation with DOK levels of complexity.” There are various types of small groups for the classroom teacher to use listed in the Teacher's Edition. There are strategy group Minilessons, intervention activities, guided reading, and conferring opportunities. 

Several online tools are available to further support teachers and students. For example, at the beginning of every unit there are “ELL Access videos to build background.” There is a Text Complexity Analysis for the Shared Reading text in each unit. This analysis includes reader and task considerations for English Language Learners, Intervention, and On Level/Advanced to support those learners. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 5, Week 4,  Lesson 2, Shared Reading, Introduce the Text, teachers are provided with ELL strategies:
    • Display the sentence from SI page 599 of Volcano Wakes Up!, that has the word lava. 
    • Emerging/Developing-Guide students in finding and echo-reading the definition in the margin. Ensure students understand each word in the definition by using accessible language and by eliciting responses to sentence frames, such as: Melted means: _____.
    • Expanding-Have students find and read the definitions of lava in the margin and use accessible language to describe lava to struggling peers.
  • In Unit 5, Week 4, Lesson 2, Assess and Differentiate, teachers are provided with intervention strategies: "Read pages 60-61 in the myFocus Reader with students. Use the teaching support online at pearsonrealize.com to provide instructional support for decoding, comprehension, word study and Academic Vocabulary."
  • In Unit 5, Week 4, Lesson 1, Assess and Differentiate, On Level and Advanced teachers are provided with strategies to use with students who are reading, writing, speaking, and listening above grade level: "Question and Investigate-Ask students to generate questions about volcanoes and choose one to investigate. Throughout the week, have students conduct research required to answer the question."

Indicator 3p

Materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.

The Language Awareness Handbook, myFocus Intervention Teacher Resource Guide, and the Teacher's Edition regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level and meet or exceed grade-level standards. The Teacher's Edition provides ELL Targeted Support throughout the units and continues the entire school year. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • The Program indicates unit launch videos that are included to “spark interest, make connections, and build knowledge to improve students’ comprehension.” The online edition of the Student Interactive provide “audio support and word-by-word-audio highlighting (K-2).” There are also ELL Access Videos to “provide background and help English language learners comprehend leveled texts.” These are all materials to support students working below grade level and English Language Learners with grade-level texts. There is “ELL Targeted Support Embedded at Point of Use” in the Teacher's Edition, as well as “dual language resources.” Sentence frames are also provided for students to help incorporate academic language.
  • The materials for Week 6 in each unit allow students to work on a research project. To support students with their reading of research articles, each article is available in three different reading levels.The teacher is also provided with If...Then conferring tips in Writer’s Workshop.
  • “The Language Awareness Handbook is a valuable resource that provides integrated reading and writing support while working in tandem with core Whole and Small Group instruction in MyView. The handbook provides models of scaffolded instruction, useful strategies, and practical routines that you can employ during reading or writing workshop. It is intended that these linguistically accommodated lessons be used during small-group time with students that you determine need additional scaffolded instruction. Refer to this handbook during planning to determine which lessons will provide the most focused scaffolds for your students. You may use any or all of the lessons or lesson parts as dictated by the needs of your students. This handbook is meant not only for the classroom teacher, but can be used by any support person working with the diverse student populations in your school.” 
  • “myFocus Intervention Teacher Resource Guide targeted instruction focuses on the development of skills and strategies to help students achieve on-grade-level expectations. The lessons are tied to national and state English Language Arts standards. Lessons can be used flexibly, based on students’ differing instructional needs and rates of mastery. Discrete skills are scaffolded into small, manageable minilessons for thorough coverage, focused practice, and built-in progress monitoring. Data-driven assessments after sets of related lessons allow teachers to monitor students’ progress efficiently and effectively.”
  • The Teacher's Edition provides intervention and ELL strategies to teachers for students who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English.

Indicator 3q

Materials regularly include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that materials regularly include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.

The materials regularly include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level. The Teacher's Edition and the Extension Activities in the Resource Download Center provide extension opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level. Examples include, but are not limited to: 

  • The Leveled Readers include a wide range so that the teacher can match students with their appropriate reading level. Students who read above grade level, read books at their instructional levels. Also, the research articles are leveled into Easy, On Level, and Challenge. Students who are reading above grade level would read the Challenge articles. The Text Complexity Charts also provide prompts/tasks for On Level and Advanced students. In the Teacher’s Edition, the Formative Assessment for each week gives students two choices so students can challenge themselves.
  • In Unit 2, Week 2, Lesson 1, Reading Workshop, Assess and Differentiate, teachers are provided with strategies to use with On Level and Advanced level students: "Have students use the infographic on pages 256-257 in the Student Interactive to generate questions about the plants and animals that live on the prairies. During the course of the week, help students research the topic and record their findings."
  • In Unit 2 of the Extension Activities in the Resource Download Center, students can select how to share their ideas using a menu, use questions to while conducting research, complete a research plan, and an inquiry plan.

Indicator 3r

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.

The materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies. These groupings are outlined in the Teacher’s Edition with lesson plans to accompany the various grouping strategies. Students work in whole group, small groups, or with a partner. The Teacher’s Edition suggests different groupings for various tasks. 

Grouping suggestions include: 

  • In small groups, leveled readers with lesson plans are included to support guided reading groups. There is a Leveled Reader Teacher's Edition, as well as a Small Group Guide to assist the classroom teacher. The Leveled Reader Teacher's Edition provides “possible teaching points for differentiation with DOK levels of complexity.”
  • There are various types of small groups for the classroom teacher to use during Reading Workshop listed in the Teacher's Edition: strategy groups, intervention groups, guided reading groups, and conferring with 2-3 students.
  • Teacher-led options for strategy groups, intervention activities, as well as suggestions for on-level and advanced support in the Teacher's Edition.
  • Collaborate Groups suggestions include Book Club ideas in the Teacher's Edition and Writing Club ideas in the Teacher's Edition.
  • Partner Work suggestions include Turn, Talk, and Share suggestions throughout the Teacher's Edition and Project-Based Inquiry Project.

Criterion 3s - 3v

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. Digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms.
0/0
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criterion for materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. Digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms. Digital materials are web-based, compatible with multiple internet browsers, “platform neutral,” follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices. Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate. Digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations and the materials can be easily customized for local use. While the materials include or reference technology that provide some opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other, the materials lack teacher guidance and support on how to conduct collaboration or how the collaboration can benefit student performance.

The overall web platform presents several navigational challenges and can be difficult to navigate when searching for resources or program components.

Indicator 3s

Digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), "platform neutral" (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple internet browsers (eg. Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), “platform neutral” (ie., Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.

The program is accessible through the internet and follows a universal programming style and allows the use of tablets and mobile devices. Some updates may be required for best compatibility.

The Realize and Realize Reader Web system requirements include the latest versions of Google™ Chrome™, Microsoft Edge®, Mozilla® Firefox®, and Apple® Safari®. By designating officially-supported operating systems and browsers, Pearson is able to ensure an optimal user experience; however, Realize and Realize Reader will operate in other, untested combinations of operating systems and browsers.

The Realize Reader Apps compatibility requirements provide the operating systems, devices, screen resolutions and accessibility programs to ensure the best user experience. A systems requirement check for compatibility is provided: Apps / Operating Systems, iOS App: Apple iPad OS 11+, iOS App: Apple iPad OS 12+, Chrome App: Chrome OS only (Mac OS and Windows not supported), Windows App: Windows 10*.

Supplementary digital materials include on page 15 of the Program Guide, references note the Reading Spot App, which houses additional leveled readers to support student reading. Throughout the Program Guide, references are made to the online support and a Google Classroom connection.

Indicator 3t

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate. 

Technology can easily be incorporated in a variety of ways to enhance student learning.  The program offers a digital platform for student texts, the teachers’ guides and support materials.

Digital materials available to students allow students to engage with texts online. In the Digital Walkthrough Guide, it states on page 2, that students have access to online games to practice vocabulary, spelling, and foundational skills.  In the Digital Walkthrough Guide, it states on page 5, students can highlight and annotate the text, play games, and watch videos. 

Online Leveled Reader Support includes ELL Access Videos build background and Interactive Graphic Organizers to make reading and thinking active.

The Reading Spot App! allows access to thousands of additional leveled readers and texts. Teachers can search for titles by: 

  • Lexile® level
  • Guided Reading level
  • Student interests and genre 
  • Language
  • Grade level

Indicator 3u

Materials can be easily customized for individual learners.
0/0

Indicator 3u.i

Digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.

The materials provide resources for teachers to create custom variations of rubrics and assessments.  This helps teachers meet the needs of their students. Teachers also have access to videos that support language learners with visual context. The app for leveled readers allows teachers to access a variety of readers beyond what is suggested in the teaching guides.

According to the Program Guide, SuccessMaker is available for Tier 3 intervention support and MyFocus Intervention is available for Tier 2 intervention. In the Program Guide, it states that teachers can differentiate instruction and assessments for students based on their needs. Teachers can assign multiple assignments to students through the online platform.

In the Digital Walkthrough Guide, it states on page 2, that students have access to online games to practice vocabulary, spelling, and foundational skills. 

Indicator 3u.ii

Materials can be easily customized for local use.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that materials can be easily customized for local use.

The material provide resources for teachers to create custom variations of rubrics and assessments. There is a tab for state customization that leads to customized lesson plans. This is available for all grades. The units are planned in a way that teachers can choose what best suits the needs in their classroom. All unit tests have the ability to modify or edit based on the needs of the students. There is a link for the teacher to customize each unit test.

Indicator 3v

Materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.).
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criteria that materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.).

The materials include some opportunities for students and teachers to collaborate electronically through digital platforms. However, the materials lack teacher guidance and support on how to conduct this collaboration or how the collaboration can benefit student accomplishments. The article, “Purposeful Uses of Technology for Literacy and Learning Through Inquiry in Grades K–5” by Julie Coiro, Ph.D. provides the teacher with a research-based article that lists the websites and other forms of technology a teacher can use to enhance the Literacy practices in the classroom.

The Digital Tools references in the Google Classroom Connection video that students can collaborate through Google Classroom on assignments that are assigned through MyView

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Additional Publication Details

Report Published Date: 04/14/2020

Report Edition: 2020

Title ISBN Edition Publisher Year
myView Literacy Digital Courseware Pilot 1-Year License Grade 2 978-0-134973-94-4 Pearson 2020

About Publishers Responses

All publishers are invited to provide an orientation to the educator-led team that will be reviewing their materials. The review teams also can ask publishers clarifying questions about their programs throughout the review process.

Once a review is complete, publishers have the opportunity to post a 1,500-word response to the educator report and a 1,500-word document that includes any background information or research on the instructional materials.

About Technology Information

EdReports requested that publishers fill out The Instructional Materials Technology Information document about each of their products that met our alignment criteria. This document does not evaluate the quality or desirability of any product functionality, but documents features in order to empower local schools and districts with information to select materials that will work best for them given their technological capabilities and instructional vision.

Please note: Beginning in spring 2020, reports developed by EdReports.org will be using an updated version of our review tools. View draft versions of our revised review criteria here.

Educator-Led Review Teams

Each report found on EdReports.org represents hundreds of hours of work by educator reviewers. Working in teams of 4-5, reviewers use educator-developed review tools, evidence guides, and key documents to thoroughly examine their sets of materials.

After receiving over 25 hours of training on the EdReports.org review tool and process, teams meet weekly over the course of several months to share evidence, come to consensus on scoring, and write the evidence that ultimately is shared on the website.

All team members look at every grade and indicator, ensuring that the entire team considers the program in full. The team lead and calibrator also meet in cross-team PLCs to ensure that the tool is being applied consistently among review teams. Final reports are the result of multiple educators analyzing every page, calibrating all findings, and reaching a unified conclusion.

Rubric Design

The EdReports.org’s rubric supports a sequential review process through three gateways. These gateways reflect the importance of standards alignment to the fundamental design elements of the materials and considers other attributes of high-quality curriculum as recommended by educators.

Advancing Through Gateways

  • Materials must meet or partially meet expectations for the first set of indicators to move along the process. Gateways 1 and 2 focus on questions of alignment. Are the instructional materials aligned to the standards? Are all standards present and treated with appropriate depth and quality required to support student learning?
  • Gateway 3 focuses on the question of usability. Are the instructional materials user-friendly for students and educators? Materials must be well designed to facilitate student learning and enhance a teacher’s ability to differentiate and build knowledge within the classroom. In order to be reviewed and attain a rating for usability (Gateway 3), the instructional materials must first meet expectations for alignment (Gateways 1 and 2).

Key Terms Used throughout Review Rubric and Reports

  • Indicator Specific item that reviewers look for in materials.
  • Criterion Combination of all of the individual indicators for a single focus area.
  • Gateway Organizing feature of the evaluation rubric that combines criteria and prioritizes order for sequential review.
  • Alignment Rating Degree to which materials meet expectations for alignment, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.
  • Usability Degree to which materials are consistent with effective practices for use and design, teacher planning and learning, assessment, and differentiated instruction.

ELA K-2 Rubric and Evidence Guides

The ELA review rubrics identify the criteria and indicators for high quality instructional materials. The rubrics support a sequential review process that reflect the importance of alignment to the standards then consider other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

For ELA, our rubrics evaluate materials based on:

  • Text Quality and Complexity, and Alignment to Standards with Tasks Grounded in Evidence
  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks
  • Instructional Supports and Usability

The ELA Evidence Guides complement the rubrics by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

The EdReports rubric supports a sequential review process through three gateways. These gateways reflect the importance of alignment to college and career ready standards and considers other attributes of high-quality curriculum, such as usability and design, as recommended by educators.

Materials must meet or partially meet expectations for the first set of indicators (gateway 1) to move to the other gateways. 

Gateways 1 and 2 focus on questions of alignment to the standards. Are the instructional materials aligned to the standards? Are all standards present and treated with appropriate depth and quality required to support student learning?

Gateway 3 focuses on the question of usability. Are the instructional materials user-friendly for students and educators? Materials must be well designed to facilitate student learning and enhance a teacher’s ability to differentiate and build knowledge within the classroom. 

In order to be reviewed and attain a rating for usability (Gateway 3), the instructional materials must first meet expectations for alignment (Gateways 1 and 2).

Alignment and usability ratings are assigned based on how materials score on a series of criteria and indicators with reviewers providing supporting evidence to determine and substantiate each point awarded.

For ELA and math, alignment ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for alignment to college- and career-ready standards, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.

For science, alignment ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for alignment to the Next Generation Science Standards, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.

For all content areas, usability ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for effective practices (as outlined in the evaluation tool) for use and design, teacher planning and learning, assessment, differentiated instruction, and effective technology use.

Math K-8

Math High School

ELA K-2

ELA 3-5

ELA 6-8


ELA High School

Science Middle School

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