Alignment: Overall Summary

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The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectations of alignment. Texts are of high quality. The materials provide opportunities for student growth in reading, writing, speaking and listening, and developing language skills over the course of the year. The materials also meet the overall expectations for instructional supports and usability, with guidance for implementation.

See Rating Scale Understanding Gateways

Alignment

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Meets Expectations

Gateway 1:

Text Quality

0
20
37
42
40
37-42
Meets Expectations
21-36
Partially Meets Expectations
0-20
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Building Knowledge

0
15
28
32
30
28-32
Meets Expectations
16-27
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

|

Meets Expectations

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
23
30
34
30
30-34
Meets Expectations
24-29
Partially Meets Expectations
0-23
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Text Quality & Complexity and Alignment to Standards Components

Meets Expectations

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Gateway One Details

The Grade 5 myView Literacy materials include a broad variety of high-quality texts of appropriate complexity. However, the organization of texts does not consistently support growth toward deep comprehension of increasingly rigorous texts as the strategies and scaffolds receive more emphasis than the texts themselves. There are a range of text types and disciplines to support students in a volume of reading.

Students participate in frequent discourse supported by a range of text-dependent questions and tasks. Writing instruction occurs daily with students producing both on-demand and process-driven products that align to the requirements of the standards. The materials include explicit instruction of grammar and conventions.

Throughout all units, students receive instruction in and practice of phonics, fluency, and word recognition and analysis skills.

Criterion 1a - 1f

Texts are worthy of students' time and attention: texts are of quality and are rigorous, meeting the text complexity criteria for each grade. Materials support students' advancing toward independent reading.
18/20
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Criterion Rating Details

The myView Literacy materials for Grade 5 include high-quality anchor texts that support student learning and build content knowledge, including a variety of fables, myths, folktales, poems, and informational texts. Texts are at the appropriate level of complexity for the grade and include a text complexity analysis detailing the quantitative and qualitative levels as well as the reader and task demands. The organization of texts does not consistently support students' deepening comprehension of increasingly rigorous texts, and there is an overemphasis on strategy and scaffolds instead of on the texts themselves. There are a broad range of text types and disciplines to support students in a volume of reading.

Indicator 1a

Anchor texts are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading and consider a range of student interests.
4/4
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for anchor texts being of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading and consider a range of student interests. The texts capture a wide range of student interests using detailed illustrations and rich language that includes the unit academic vocabulary. Texts support student learning and build knowledge of the unit theme. 

  • In Unit 1, Week 4, students read poems: “Learning the World” by Kristine O'Connell, “Latitude Longitude Dreams” by Drew Lamm and James Hildreth, “A Map and a Dream” by Karen O’Donnell Taylor, and “Early Explorers” by Marilyn Singer. They are a collection of interesting, diverse poems that relate to the other texts in the unit.
  • In Unit 2, Week 1, students read Far from Shore by Sophie Webb. This journal format with watercolor illustrations support the content of the text and provide an engaging story to explore the life of Sophie Webb, a scientist working on the Eastern Tropical Pacific Ocean. 
  • In Unit 2, Week 2, students read A Place for Frogs by Melissa Stewart. The text includes vibrant illustrations that accurately depict the frog within its ecosystem.
  • In Unit 3, Week 2, students read A Pet for Calvin by Barbara Robinson. This realistic fiction text is a humorous story relatable to students and supported by comical illustrations that help the reader picture the story.
  • In Unit 4, Week 3, students read an excerpt from the Bill of Rights by Amie Jane Leavitt. This informational text contains rich academic vocabulary paired with rich illustrations. The text structure is appropriate for complex information and provides context for close reading.
  • In Unit 5, Week 3, students read The Dog of Pompeii by Louis Untermeyer. This is a historical fiction text that contains rich vocabulary and descriptions. The historical context adds to student interest.
  • In Unit 5, Week 5, students read People Should Manage Nature by Lee Francis IV. This argumentative text that contains strong academic vocabulary. The illustrations are clear and aid in the understanding of the text.

Indicator 1b

Materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.
4/4
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for materials reflecting the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level. Students have multiple opportunities to read a variety of informational and literary texts. Genres include fables, myths, folktales, poetry, and informational texts.  

The following are examples of literature found within the instructional materials:

  • In Unit 1, Excerpt from Pedro’s Journal by Pam Conrad
  • In Unit 2, The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett
  • In Unit 3, Artist to Artist by David Adedjouma
  • In Unit 4, The Scarlet Stockings Spy by Trinka Hakes Noble
  • In Unit 5, The Dog of Pompeii by Louis Untermeyer
  • In Unit 5, Journey to the Center of the Earth by Jules Verne

The following are examples of informational text found within the instructional materials:

  • In Unit 1, Picturesque Journeys by Yanitzia Canetti
  • In Unit 2, “Let Wild Animals Be Wild and Don’t Release Animals Back to the Wild” by David Bowles and By René Saldaña Jr.
  • In Unit 2, Far from Shore by Sophie Webb
  • In Unit 3, What Is It Made Of? By Hanna North
  • In Unit 4, The Bill of Rights by Amie Jane Leavitt

Indicator 1c

Texts have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and relationship to their associated student task.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for texts having the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and relationship to their associated student task. Most texts reviewed are aligned to the complexity requirements outlined in the Common Core State Standards. Anchor texts are placed at the appropriate grade level. Examples include:

  • In Unit 1, Week 1, Louie Share Kim, Paper Son by Barbara D. Krasner, 990L. This informational text has chronological text structure, supported by the use of dates and other signal words (in 1916, in 1924, when Share Kim was 20 years old). The photographs and captions directly support the text and help readers relate to Share Kim and his family. Students may need background knowledge to fully understand the history of Chinese immigration and the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882.
  • In Unit 2, Week 5, Don’t Release Animals Back to the Wild By René Saldaña, Jr., 900L. In this argumentative text, students follow the author’s reasons and opinions about why captive animals should not be released into the wild.
  • In Unit 3, Week 2, A Pet for Calvin By Barbara Robinson, 790L. The third-person narrative follows a chronological order and a typical plot structure. Calvin wants a pet but cannot have a pet because of his allergies; Calvin finds a worm and makes it his pet. The illustrations directly support the story by showing the characters, setting, and events.
  • In Unit 4, Week 2, The Scarlet Stockings Spy By Trinka Hakes Noble, 1000L. The story takes place in 1777 during the American Revolution. The text makes references to historical figures, events, and colonial occupations. Some students may be familiar with the war from prior reading, but additional background knowledge about the revolution and Colonial America may be needed.
  • In Unit 5, Week 4, Let’s Talk Trash by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), 880L. The infographic provides details about understanding how much food is wasted and ways to reduce food waste in the home. Students can infer that the author’s purpose is to inform readers about how to reduce wasted food.

The following texts have a Lexile level above the grade-level band, yet the qualitative measure and reader and task components make the text accessible for students.

  • In Unit 1, Week 3, excerpt from Pedro’s Journal by Pam Conrad, 980L. Students examine the historical fiction aspects of the text. Students explore point of view in this novel and use textual evidence to support an appropriate response. The text is written in a journal style. The author uses highly descriptive words; however, the materials provide scaffolds and supports for students to access the vocabulary in the text.  
  • In Unit 2, Week 1, Far from Shore by Sophie Webb, 1040L. The text is just outside the stretch Lexile Level (740-1010). This text supports the unit topic, is written in journal format with illustrations, and is engaging to read. The activity guides students in understanding complex text as well as other text features.

Indicator 1d

Materials support students' increasing literacy skills over the course of the school year. (Series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels appropriate for the grade band.)
2/4
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the criteria for materials supporting students’ increasing literacy skills over the course of the school year. (Series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels appropriate for the grade band.)

The lessons around the anchor texts are structured to engage students and build comprehension skills, including student demonstration of these skills. Expectations for each lesson are clearly stated and the teacher’s guide is structured for scaffolded instruction that allows for teacher modeling, peer work, and release to independent demonstration of skills. The beginning of the units have students responding to Level 2 Depth of Knowledge (DOK 2) questions based on the passages. Those questions build and increase to DOK 3 questions in the middle and end of each unit. However, the organization of texts does not consistently support students' deepening comprehension of increasingly rigorous texts, and there is an overemphasis on strategy and scaffolds instead of on the texts themselves.

  • The complexity of anchor texts students read provides an opportunity for students’ literacy skills to increase across the year, encompassing an entire year’s worth of growth. For example, in Unit 1, Week 1, Student Interactive, Check for Understanding, students are given a main idea of a text and asked to identify a supporting detail. For a second text, students identify a main idea and supporting detail. After reading a selection during Reading Workshop, students identify the author’s purpose for writing a text and explain their reasoning.
  • In Unit 2, Week 1, Reading Workshop, the teacher models and practices identifying main idea of a text by explaining what a main idea is, that titles may provide help in identifying the main idea, and that main ideas are often found at the beginning of the paragraph. Students engage in a turn and talk to identify both the topic and the main idea of a passage. After reading a selection students identify the author’s purpose for writing a text and provide textual evidence to support their thinking.
  • In Unit 3, Week 1, Reading Workshop, after reading a selection, students explain the author’s purpose and how they determined the purpose. In Week 5, Reading Workshop, students use setting, events, characters, and theme to explain the author’s purpose in writing a text. 
  • In Unit 4, Week 4, Reading Workshop, after reading a selection students identify the main idea and supporting details, writing each in sentences.
  • In Unit 5, Week 1, Reading Workshop, after reading a selection, students identify a main idea and three supporting details and engage in a Turn and Talk discussion identifying another main idea from the passage.
  • The complexity of anchor texts support students’ proficiency in reading independently at grade level at the end of the school year. For example, Unit 1 includes texts with Lexile levels of 990 and 1020. Unit 2 includes texts with Lexile levels of 780 and 1040. Unit 3 includes texts with Lexile levels of 790 and 950. Unit 4 includes texts with Lexile levels of 850 and 590. Unit 5 includes texts with Lexile levels of 930 and 820.

Indicator 1e

Anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for purpose and placement in the grade level.
2/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for purpose and placement in the grade level. 

The Getting Started section of the instructional materials contains a detailed text complexity analysis and rationale for each anchor texts in all units. Under the Table of Contents for each unit, a Text Complexity Charts tab is accessible and includes information on recommended placement, quantitative measures, complexity levels, qualitative measures, and reader and task considerations for each weekly shared reading text. Less detailed information for supporting Book Club texts and Leveled Readers can also be found in the unit Table of Contents by clicking on the appropriate tab. All anchor texts include a quantitative and qualitative analysis complete with Reader and Task Considerations to enable planning for diverse student needs including English Language Learners, intervention, and on-level/advanced students. There are Visual Charts for complexity levels in the areas of meaning/purpose, text structure, language conventionality and clarity, and knowledge demands that rate each on a colored grid from “simple” to “very complex” in tandem with a clear and explicit qualitative rationale for each. The Teacher's Edition lists descriptions for leveled readers and how they connect to the theme and essential question. A drop-down link for the leveled readers contains a pdf guide complete with the title and author, Lexile level, guided reading level, DRA level, as well as instructional notes, the leveled readers are leveled for differentiation and not anchored to grade level instruction. Guidance is provided for the teacher using teaching points and ELL supports. The Program Overview in the digital materials has a link titled, Text Rationale and Diversity. In this link, the publisher provides a general rational that states, “Texts were chosen based on criteria such as literary merit, author’s craft, themed, gender, and cultural representations/experiences, insight, readability and diversity.”

  • In Unit 1, Week 2, The Path to Paper Son by Grant Din is an informational text with a Lexile level of 1020. The quantitative measures place this text upper level of readability for Grade 5. The qualitative measures suggest that students might need additional support with Language: Idioms and figures of speech and Knowledge Demands: Chinese immigration in the mid-1800s.  "Before reading this selection, the teacher should use the Reader and Task Considerations to plan how to address various student populations." Qualitative Considerations include:
    • Levels of Meaning/Purpose: The author’s purpose is implied but easy to identify because the main idea is clear. Explanations and examples help show that the main purpose is to inform readers about the history of Chinese immigration to the United States and the concept of “paper sons.”
    • Text Structure: The text follows a mostly chronological structure, but connections between some ideas are implicit. The photograph and “Did You Know?” feature provide some additional information but are not needed to understand the main idea. 
    • Language Conventionality and Clarity: The sentences are mostly compound and complex. The vocabulary is largely familiar and conversational; however, students may need support understanding the terms in quotation marks: “son” “father’s,” and “paper son.” 
    • Knowledge Demands: The subject matter includes events many students may not relate to, and the time period of the piece will not be familiar. Students will benefit from background knowledge of Chinese immigration during the mid-1880s and the San Francisco earthquake.
  • In Unit 3, Week 4, The Hermit Thrush by Dana Crum is a drama. The quantitative measures are not generated for poetry and drama. See the qualitative analysis for support. The qualitative measures suggest that students might need additional support with Language: Idioms and figurative language and Knowledge Demands: Dramatic elements. "Before reading this selection, the teacher should use the Reader and Task Considerations to plan how to address various student populations." Qualitative Considerations include:
    • Levels of Meaning/Purpose: The theme of doing what you love is clear and revealed explicitly. The secondary theme of perseverance to achieve a goal is related to The Carp.
    • Text Structure: The drama follows a clear sequential order and illustrations directly support the text by showing characters, setting, and events. Students may need assistance understanding dramatic elements, such as stage directions, scenes, and dialogue, and how they are used to develop the plot, settings, and characters. 
    • Language Conventionality and Clarity: The sentences are simple with some complex sentences. The vocabulary is mostly familiar and conversational. Students may need assistance with some figurative and idiomatic language, such as just keep at it, may as well get it over with, sounds like a sick moose, loosen up, saxophone walls, and feel the music
    • Knowledge Demands: The plot events will be familiar and relatable to students who have practiced music, a sport, or another hobby, but have felt frustrated when they did not perform perfectly.
  • In Unit 4, a Leveled Readers titled, Road to Freedom by Lara Iemma. Guided Reading Level 5, DRA level 50, 950L, and word count 3,861. The Text Characteristics include a text structure “Description” and text features of, “Photographs, Illustrations, Captions, Timeline, Text Boxes, Glossary, Index.”
  • In Unit 5, Saving the Great Lakes by Rosina Thompson. Guided Reading Level W, DRA Level 60, 1000L. and word count 3,524. This text connects with the theme for Unit 5 and provides the students with the opportunity to turn and talk, discuss, and understand the elements of informational text.

Indicator 1f

Anchor text(s), including support materials, provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading.
2/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that anchor and supporting texts provide opportunities for students to engage in a broad range of text types and disciplines as well as a volume of reading to achieve grade-level reading proficiency.

The materials provide multiple opportunities each week for students to engage in a volume of reading on grade level. Each week, students hear a Read Aloud text and a Shared Text to anchor instructional activities. Small group lessons are included with Leveled Reader selections that range within the grade level band with additional titles available through the online resource provided. Students also engage in independent reading during Book Club time which offers multiple texts that students can choose and read. Students participate in Reading Workshop for 10-20 minutes daily and Small Group Independent time for 20-30 minutes daily for a daily total up to 50 minutes. During Week 6, students complete a research project with articles provided for students to read supporting the research task. Throughout the program, students read a wide variety of text types across multiple disciplines. Examples of texts students read include, but are not limited to: 

  • In Unit 1, Week 6, students read Culture Shock, All Aboard! And Ellis Island: The Immigrant Journey in order to create a travel brochure. 
  • In Unit 2, Week 1, Reading Workshop, students hear/read the Shared and Close Read, Far from Shore by Sophie Webb.
  • In Unit 3, Week 4, Poetry Collection: students read Artist to Artist by David Adedjouma, Sepia and Spruce by Malathai Michelle Iyengar.
  • In Unit 4, Week 2, students hear the Read Aloud, Jefferson’s Desk; Shared Read, The Scarlett Stockings Spy; read Leveled Readers, Something in the Air (Level T), The World Beneath the Waves (Level T), Reflections in Glass Town (Level U), A Slimy Situation  (Level V), To Tell the Truth (Level V), Power of the People (Level W); and Book Club selections, Guns for General Washington by Seymour Reit, Stealing Freedom by Elisa Carbone, Bad News for Outlaws by Vaunda Micheaux Nelson, The Pilgrims of Plimoth  by Marcia Sewall, The Boy in the Striped Pajamas  by John Boyne, and Stormy Seas: Stories of Young Boat Refugees by Mary Beth Lauderdale.
  • In Unit 5, Week 2, students hear the Read Aloud, Why Does Ice Float?; Shared Read, Earth’s Water Cycle, read Leveled Readers, The Changing Earth (Level U), Tropical Rain Forests (Level U), Earth’s Changing Landscape (Level V), Ocean Forces (Level V), Earth’s Fury (Level W), Saving the Great Lakes (Level W), and Book Club selections, Into the Volcano by Donna O’Meara, One Day in the Desert by Jean Craighead George, Inside Biosphere 2  by Mary Kay Carson, Journey to the Center of the Earth by Jules Verne, Earthquakes and Volcanoes by Lin Sutherland, and Landslides, Slumps, & Creep by Peter H. Goodwin.

Criterion 1g - 1n

Materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills.
16/16
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Criterion Rating Details

Students participate in frequent discourse about texts and topics supported by protocols that encourage the use of academic vocabulary and syntax within evidence-based discussions and writing. The materials employ a range of text-dependent questions and tasks that cause students to return to the texts as they read, write, and engage in discussions with peers. Writing instruction occurs daily with students producing both on-demand and process-driven products that align to the requirements of the standards. The materials include explicit instruction of grammar and conventions.

Indicator 1g

Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-dependent, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).
2/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that most questions, tasks, and assignments are text dependent/specific, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text). 

The materials include questions, tasks, and extension activities that support literacy growth for students over the course of the school year. Throughout all units, particularly the Reading Workshop sections, students are exposed to various genres and multiple readings, including a first read, close read, and reflect and share in each lesson. There are three components to each reading lesson under Reading Workshop. All three components during Reading Workshop include questions, tasks, and assignments that are text-dependent/specific. During the first read, students preview vocabulary from the text, preview the text itself, read the text, develop vocabulary, and check for understanding. During the close read, using an informational text, students analyze specific concepts such as craft, structure, plot, setting, make predictions, and use context clues within the sentence to determine the meaning of vocabulary words. Students also, reflect and share during the Reading Workshop. Students answer a variety of questions related to the texts being read, and the discussion supports students drawing on textual evidence to support their learning of literal and inferential information. Students produce evidence from texts to support their opinions or statements when writing and speaking. In addition, there are supports within the materials to assist the student or group of students in order to demonstrate their thinking about the theme or essential question for the week. 

  • Unit 1, Week 1, Reading Workshop, after reading “The Path to Paper Son”, students answer, “What two events made it possible for people to create ‘paper sons?”
  • In Unit 2, Week 2, Reading Workshop, students read, A Place for Frogs by Melissa Stewart, and “Highlight a problem that the author is addressing in paragraph 28-31 and the section Helping Frogs.”
  • In Unit 2, Week 5, Reading Workshop, after reading the books, Let Wild Animals be Wild and Don’t Release Animals Back to the Wild by David Bowles and Rene Saldana Jr., students answer, “How does each text use animal sanctuaries to support its claim? Use text evidence in your comparison.”
  • Unit 3, Week 4, Reading Workshop, after reading “Artist to Artist”, students answer, “How do you know that 'Artist to Artist,' 'Sepia,' and 'Spruce' are poems? Give three examples.”
  • In Unit 4, Week 3, Reading Workshop, after reading The Bill of Rights by Amy Jane Leavitt, students “Underline the text that shows a cause and effect relationship between details in paragraph 5.”
  • In Unit 4, Week 4, Reading Workshop, students read Delivering Justice by Jim Haskins and “Compare the ways African Americans and white people were treated in Savannah in 1941 to the ways they were treated in late 1961.”
  • Unit 5, Week 2, Reading Workshop, students are directed, “With a partner, write down the three states of water. Then make predictions about how one state becomes another based on the reading.”
  • Unit 5, Week 2, Reading Workshop, Check for Understanding, after reading Water, Water, Everywhere by Diane Dakers, students answer, “What details make Earth’s Water Cycle an informational text?”

Indicator 1h

Sets of high-quality sequences of text-dependent questions and tasks build to a culminating task that integrates skills (may be writing, speaking, or a combination).
2/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for having sets of high-quality sequences of text-dependent/specific questions and tasks build to a culminating task that integrates skills (may be writing, speaking, or a combination).

The Readers Workshop, Readers Writers Workshop Bridge, and the Writing Workshop provide teacher modeling for sequences of text-dependent questions that allow students to observe, practice, and revise skills independently, with peers, and in groups. Through presentation and discussion of content, students demonstrate their knowledge by completing tasks that include application of learned reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills. In Week 6, the Project-Based Inquiry task bridges what was learned in both the Reading and Writing Workshops. The grading rubrics are formatted to assess a student on the final project that includes applying what was learned in Weeks 1-5, as well as presenting on the material.

  • In Unit 1, Week 5, Writing Workshop, Publish and Celebrate, Independent Writing, students refer to texts in order to brainstorm ideas for their personal narrative. At this point in the week, students have developed a rough draft and in Week 5 and then complete the final draft of their personal narrative. The teacher is provided guidance in supporting students in the final draft by referencing the Conference Prompts on page T344. 
  • In Unit 3, Week 6, the Project-Based Inquiry focuses on skills and knowledge built throughout the unit. Students complete research and write a speech about a person who inspires them. Students work through research tasks by collaborating as they plan and create the brochure. Students present their final project.
  • In Unit 4, Week 3, Reading Workshop, from The Bill of Rights, during Reflect and Share, students “Write to Sources: The Bill of Rights outlines freedoms protected by the U.S. government. Consider the texts you have read this week. What have you learned about the freedoms that people want and need? Use examples from the texts you read this week to write and support a response.”  
  • In Unit 5, Week 6, Project-Based Inquiry, students connect what was learned on the topic of systems in Weeks 1-5. Students compare texts read in Weeks 1-5, apply the academic vocabulary, and utilize the argumentative style of writing while connecting evidence from the article, “Emergency.” Students collaborate and use a self-evaluation checklist to guide the creation of their public service announcement. When the students refine their research, they learn about and build a bibliography. In addition, the students have an opportunity to refine their public service announcement draft and later edit it, prior to submitting the final draft and presenting to the class.

Indicator 1i

Materials provide frequent opportunities and protocols for evidencebased discussions that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax. (May be small group and all-class.)
2/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for materials providing frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions (small groups, peer-to-peer, whole class) that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax.

Practice for academic vocabulary and syntax are present for each unit in the Turn and Talk and Collaborate sections. Students practice using academic and social language while engaging in evidence-based discussions about the material in smaller groups and within the larger class. Students engage in paired, small group, and whole group discussions at various points in the units. The materials include guidance for teachers in establishing protocols for student discussions throughout the units. Development of discussion techniques and practices are ongoing throughout the units with guiding questions provided to help students develop discussion practices. Suggestions for discussion structure are also provided. 

  • In Unit 1, Week 6, Compare Across Texts, the Turn and Talk states, “In this unit, you learned many new words to talk about Journeys. With a partner, go back to each selection and find a sentence that best illustrates the meaning of an academic vocabulary word. Explain why that word fits that quotation.”
  • In Unit 1, Week 4, Reading Workshop: Infographic Turn and Talk states, “Where would you want to go on a journey? What thoughts and impressions would you include in a poem about your travels? Jot down notes to respond. Then use your notes to tell a partner about your plans.”
  • In Unit 3, Week 3, the Academic Vocabulary section states, “What can music demonstrate about a person’s experiences? What can you recall about the art you’ve seen in your life?” The Turn Talk and Share states, “Have students talk with a partner about creative expression. Guide them to take notes during the discussion.”
  • In Unit 4, Week 1, Reading Workshop, Reflect and Share, Academic Vocabulary, students begin to incorporate unit Academic Vocabulary words into their discussions and their own writing. During the First Read, the teacher models how to listen carefully to one another and ask questions to make sure they understand the partner’s point of view. Students then use the modeled strategies to discuss relevant questions about Keeping Mr. John Holton Alive.

Indicator 1j

Materials support students' listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching (including presentation opportunities) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for materials supporting students’ listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching (including presentation opportunities) with relevant follow-up questions and supports. 

The materials provide a variety of opportunities for students to ask questions and hold discussions with peers and teachers about research, strategies and ideas throughout each unit. Several opportunities for speaking and listening are in each unit that include both whole group and small group discussions including partner work and peer reviews. 

Students engage in discussion throughout the materials. In addition to the labeled discussions in the text, there are multiple questions for each text that the teacher poses to the class which would lead to class discussions. There is an audio option for students to listen to the text being read to them. Additionally, students engage in Book Clubs that involve reading a text and discussing the text with a peer group. Students regularly have discussions about their writing and the writing process. Each unit also provides an Inquiry project that involves collaboration with a group in creating the project and then presenting the project to either a small group or the whole class. There is a Listening Comprehension guide in the Teacher’s Edition of each Unit. The materials provide the teacher with support in the planning, providing graphic organizers or other supports for learning the skills and content, but not specifically for listening, speaking, or presenting with evidence.

  • In Unit 1, Week 3, the Teacher's Edition has a Listening Comprehension guide that directs students to actively listen for elements of historical fiction. 
  • In Unit 1, Week 3, Whole Group Formative Assessment time, students work with a partner talking about the differences and similarities in how historical fiction and informational texts use facts. 
  • In Unit 2, Week 5, Writing Workshop, students share their ideas about publishing their informational article. Student pairs talk about why publishing in one way might be more effective than another for certain types of writing.
  • In Unit 3, Week 6 of Compare Across Texts, the Turn and Talk states, “Read the sentence attached to each selection. Then, with a partner, review the selection and write a question for each 'answer' section. Finally, talk to your partner about how the answer relates to the theme.”
  • In Unit 4, Week 6, Book Club, Session 2, students begin their conversations about the book, Guns for General Washington. Questions are provided to help spark collaborative discussions if necessary. Students use their Discussion Charts to help in their discussions. 
  • In Unit 5, Week 6 of the Project-Based Inquiry, directions state, “This week students will address the theme of Systems by collaboratively researching and writing a script for a public service announcement (PSA). They will research ways people can help the environment and create positive changes in one of Earth’s systems.” Before final publication, student pairs present their public service announcements orally to another student pair. If students have recorded their PSAs, students should be prepared to share it with their audience.

Indicator 1k

Materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g. multiple drafts, revisions over time) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for materials including a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g. multiple drafts, revisions over time) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate. 

The materials include a balanced variety of on-demand and process writing throughout all lessons. Each unit has a theme for process writing that focuses on developing a specific form of writing that is written and revised over the course of the first five weeks of the unit. Students engage in multiple methods of writing to develop their writing skills including note-taking, checklists, response notebooks, graphic organizers, short answer, and longer essay construction. Students participate in planning, composing, revising, and publishing throughout the unit with individual work, peer conferencing, and teacher conferencing. Each unit contains multiple on-demand writings which are varied in type of writing and length of writing. Students complete a Process Inquiry Project in Week 6 of each unit that contains a short, focused project that calls for research, writing, revising, and publishing much of which is done on a digital platform. The Readers Workshop has students responding throughout in their digital notebooks. The Writing Workshop allows for longer writing activities that include drafting and editing while the Project-Based Inquiry has students applying the learned writing skills in a culminating activity. Student writing develops over the course of the year. 

  • In Unit 1, Week 4, Reading Workshop, Compare Texts Reflect and Share, students complete a quick write to compare and contrast the different language and sound devices used to express similar ideas in poems.
  • In Unit 2, Week 3 of the Writers Workshop, My Turn states, “In your writing notebook, use the graphic organizer as a model for the introduction to your informational article. Then develop a draft of your introduction.”
  • In Unit 3, Week 1, students are introduced to opinion essay writing. In Week 2, students work on developing the elements of opinion essay. In Week 3, students develop the structure of opinion essay writing. In Week 4, students work on writer’s craft for opinion essay. In Week 5, students publish, celebrate, and assess their opinion essay writing.
  • In Unit 4, Week 1, Reading-Writing Bridge: Develop Author’s Craft, students “Write a brief dialogue between two characters from your area. Use an appropriate style of language to make the character’s sound realistic.”
  • In Unit 4, Week 4, Writing Workshop, students Peer Edit: “Editing one another’s writing to make it stronger is called peer editing. When peer editing, opinion essays, writers respectfully provide useful feedback by: Pointing out both strong and weak reasons, Identifying where more evidence and/or details are needed, Pointing out where ideas are unclear or disorganized, Using specific language when making recommendations for improvement.”  
  • In Unit 5, Week 1, Weekly Launch, Interact with Sources, students complete a quick write to answer, “What can people learn from digging into Earth?”

Indicator 1l

Materials provide opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for materials providing opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards. 

The materials provide frequent and multiple narrative, informal, and opinion writing opportunities across the school year. Students learn how to develop writing skills through exposure, practice, and application, requiring the use of evidence gathered from the analysis of materials and claims developed from reading and working with a myriad of sources. Materials provide opportunities that build students' writing skills through the use of checklists, models, and rubrics. Students are given opportunities for instruction and practice in a variety of genres addressed in the standards over the course of the school year. Direction and guidance from the teacher provide the support needed for student development as an effective writer.

  • In Unit 1, Week 3, Reading Workshop, Compare Texts, Reflect and Share, after reading Pedro’s Journal, students write a response to the prompt: “On October 10 Pedro writes in his journal, ‘There is nothing out here. Surely we are lost.’ On October 12, he writes that the Santa Maria arrives at an island. Based on what you read in Pedro’s Journal, do you think the captain knew with certainty that the ships would reach land soon? Use text evidence to support your opinion.”
  • Unit 1, Week 5, Writing Workshop, the Narrative Nonfiction Writing Rubric provides the students with guidelines as to how they will be assessed on their final piece of nonfiction writing. The assessment provides the criterion that the students need to fulfill in their final draft.
  • In Unit 2, Week 2, Readers-Writers Bridge: Develop Author’s Craft, after reading A Place for Frogs, students “Write a paragraph that begins with an opinion reflecting a concern about frogs. Support your opinion with details and facts that will help readers understand your concern. Develop a text feature that supports your opinion.”
  • Unit 3, Week 2, Writing Workshop, Develop an Opinion, students receive instructional support in developing a piece of opinion writing. There are Minilessons, writing supports, and conferencing to guide the students through the writing process that is focused on opinion writing.
  • In Unit 4, Week 3, Reading-Writing Bridge: Develop Author’s Craft, student directions state, “Write an informational passage about a topic, and include supporting details to develop your topic. Make sure your main ideas, facts and details reveal your purpose for writing.”
  • Unit 5, Week 6, Project-Based Inquiry, Argumentative Writing, students research, collaborate, plan, and develop an argumentative writing sample. The writing becomes part of their final project that is assessed by a rubric.

Indicator 1m

Materials include frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support careful analyses, well-defended claims, and clear information.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for materials including frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support careful analyses, well-defended claims, and clear information appropriate for the grade level.

The materials provide tasks that support integrated reading and writing throughout the year. Each unit includes varied opportunities for students to engage, respond, revise, and build upon their learning using texts they read. Writing opportunities are embedded within daily instruction and throughout student activities. Students have several occasions to analyze the text, define their claims, and support their writing with evidence from one or multiple texts. Students are asked to use their recall of information to formulate ideas and often use close reading of the text to support those ideas with evidence from the texts. In Weeks 1-5, a Weekly Question is tied to the shared text students read. In the Reflect and Share component of the Reading Workshop, students respond to this question in writing, citing evidence from the text to defend their claim or provide the information requested in the prompt. In Week 6 of each unit, students complete a culminating research inquiry project in which they write in response to text, cite reasons to support their claims and apply their understanding of the unit theme and Essential Question. Teachers support students by modeling how to analyze and respond effectively to build knowledge through evidence-based writing.

  • In Unit 2, Week 1, Reading-Writing Bridge, Develop Author’s Craft, Write for a Reader, students state a claim regarding how they can use graphic features the same way the author, Sophie Webb, did in Far from Shore. This is a loose claim that students will write with the use of the text; however, there is an opportunity for the teacher to guide the student to use examples from the text to support their claims in using graphic features.
  • In Unit 3, Week 6, Project-Based Inquiry, students use the article, “Awesome Jane Addams,” to plan their research and recognize the characteristics and structures of argumentative text. After students read the article, they answer the following questions to facilitate critical understanding, “Which sentence explains the author’s central idea? Name two reasons the author provides to support the claim. In your opinion, which reason is the most convincing? Why? Which evidence supports the fact that Addam’s hard work led to the growth of Hull House over the years that followed?” Students then write a speech indicating why a day should be dedicated to a famous person.
  • In Unit 4, Week 4, Reading Workshop, Reflect and Share, after reading Delivering Justice, students respond in writing with text evidence to the prompt, “What are some things people can do when their freedom is limited?”
  • In Unit 5, Week 6, Project-Based Inquiry, Collaborate, students explore and plan argumentative writing: “Have student pairs use the Plan Your Research activity to help them recognize the characteristics and structures of argumentative texts, determine their claim, and choose which evidence they will incorporate to support their argument.”

Indicator 1n

Materials include explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for materials including explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context. 

Each unit has lessons that incorporate the grammar and conventions standards for Grade 5. Grammar and conventions lessons are primarily addressed during the Reading-Writing Bridge lessons, Writing Workshop, Week 6 lessons, and via digital worksheets. The grammar and convention lessons are structured with teacher modeling, then students practicing the target skill. In addition, there are teacher resources that provide the teacher with additional lessons, including lessons for English Language Learners, students needing intervention and small group practice opportunities for students who show mastery of grade level concepts. 

Examples of explicit instruction of the grade level grammar and conventions standards in increasingly sophisticated contexts and student opportunities for application both in and out of context include, but are not limited to:

Explain the function of conjunctions, prepositions, and interjections in general and their function in particular sentences.

  • In Unit 4, Week 4, Lesson 1, Reading-Writing Workshop Bridge, Language & Conventions, Correlative Conjunctions, p. T278, the teacher reviews coordinating and subordinating conjunctions on page T208-T209 and creates a conjunction bank including coordinating conjunctions and subordinating conjunctions.  Students write two simple sentences, join the two sentences with different conjunctions, and discuss how the meaning changes. Pairs of students write three sentences using coordinating and subordinating conjunctions.
  • In Unit 4, Week 5, Lesson 1, Reading-Writing Workshop Bridge, Language & Conventions, Capitalization, Spiral Review: Correlative Conjunctions, p. T354, the teacher reviews the Language and Conventions lesson on correlative conjunctions on pp. T278-T279. The teacher models an example by writing a sentence on the board. Students circle the conjunctions and discuss that the conjunctions have parallel structure. Pairs of students form phrases for correlative conjunctions and discuss the phrases with the class. Students write sentences of their own using correlative conjunctions. 
  • In Unit 3, Week 1, Lesson 3, Reading-Writing Workshop Bridge, Language & Conventions, Prepositions and Prepositional Phrases, Teach Prepositions and Prepositional Phrases, p. T73, the teacher writes this sentence on the board: "A list of rules (guides, guide) their behavior." The teacher explains the rules of a prepositional phrase. The teacher displays another sentence. Students select the correct verb and explains the reason for their choice. Students then identify all three prepositions and prepositional phrases in the sentence and explain the function of each by telling what information it adds.
  • In Unit 5, Week 2, Writing Workshop, Develop Elements, Use Interjections, p. T156, the teacher explains interjections are words or phrases that authors use to express strong feelings or sudden emotions, can appear in sentences or stand alone, and often followed by punctuation. The teacher writes sentences on the board, but does not include the punctuation after the interjections. Students discuss each sentence by determining what is the interjection in the sentence, what emotion is expressed, and should the interjection be followed by an exclamation mark or a comma. The teacher informs students that interjections may be used in poems, dialogue, and friendly letters, and they should not overuse interjections in their writing. In the Student Interactive, My Turn, p. 503, students complete the activity using correct punctuation.

Form and use the perfect tense verbs (e.g., I had walked, I have walked, I will have walked).

  • In Unit 2, Week 4, Lesson 3, Reading-Writing Workshop Bridge, Teach Perfect Verb Tenses, p. T281, the teacher explains that perfect verb tenses indicate a completed action, an action can be completed in the present (“I have finished”, it could have been completed in the past (“I had finished”), or it will be completed some time in the future (“I will have finished”), and that the perfect verb tenses are the present perfect, the past perfect, and the future perfect. The teacher models using all three perfect tenses in sentences. Students create related sentences using all three perfect tenses.
  • In Unit 2, Week 4, Writing Workshop, Use Correct Verb Tense, p. T287, the teaching point in the Minilesson indicates writers use verb tense to show various times, sequences of events, states, and conditions. The perfect tense uses a form of have with the past participle. The teacher writes a sentence on the board, explains that the verb tenses don’t match, and depending on when the action took place, the sentence can be corrected two ways and demonstrates. The teacher writes a similar sentence, and students tell which verbs should be changed and why. In Student Interactive, My Turn activity, p. 358, students complete sentences with the correct perfect tense verb and compare answers with their partner.

Use verb tense to convey various times, sequences, states, and conditions.

  • In Unit 2, Week 2, Lesson 3, Reading-Writing Workshop Bridge, Language & Conventions, Principal Parts of Regular Verbs, Teach Principal Parts of Regular Verbs, p. T145, the teacher explains principal parts of a verb are the present (tells what is happening now), the present participle (often used after a form of be), the past (tells what has happened), and the past participle (often used after a form of have), and that verb tenses, which show times, sequence of events, states, and conditions, are formed from these principal parts. The teacher displays a regular verb and four sentences that show its principal parts used correctly and then chooses another regular verb and displays four sentences that show its principal parts used incorrectly. Students correct these sentences.

Recognize and correct inappropriate shifts in verb tense.

  • In Unit 5, Week 5, Writing Workshop, Edit for Irregular Verbs, p. T351, the teacher works with students to create a list of irregular verbs and chooses two verbs and creates sentences in the present and past tense and uses the past participle. Students study the chart on p. 602 of the Student Interactive. The teacher points out that some irregular verbs have the same irregular form for the past tense and past participle while others have different forms and remind students to use the past participle after forms of the helping verb, have. In Student Interactive, My Turn activity, p. 602, students edit the draft by correctly spelling high-frequency words and words with grade-appropriate orthographic patterns and rules.

Use correlative conjunctions (e.g., either/or, neither/nor).

  • In Unit 4, Week 4, Lesson 3, Reading-Writing Workshop Bridge, Language & Conventions, Correlative Conjunctions, Teach Correlative Conjunctions, p. 279, the lesson focuses on correlative conjunctions. This includes the use of neither and nor. The teacher writes three related sentences on the board and combines the sentences using a correlative conjunction and models how to edit the sentences. A volunteer reads the first two sentences on p. 352 of the Student Interactive, and students suggest ways to combine them using correlative conjunctions.

Use punctuation to separate items in a series.

  • In Unit 2, Week 5, Writing Workshop, Edit for Punctuation Marks, p. 354, the teacher explains that writers edit their work for mistakes and to improve their writing. The purpose and examples of use are shared for commas and quotation marks. The teacher asks the students several questions about punctuation with commas and quotation marks (in what ways, why, what does it mean). In the Student Interactive, p. 393, students edit the paragraph for correct quotation marks and commas. Students work in pairs to look through classroom library books and use sticky notes to find and mark examples of usage with commas and quotation marks.

Use a comma to separate an introductory element from the rest of the sentence.

  • In Unit 5, Week 2, Lessons 3 and 4, Reading-Writing Workshop Bridge, Language & Conventions, Commas and Introductory Elements, p. T146, the teacher explains that when a sentence is directed to a person by name to use a comma; this makes it clear that the person’s name is not part of the information. The teacher explains when a sentence begins with an introductory word or phrase (ex: yes, as usual), that this is followed by a comma. The teacher models by displaying a couple of sentences that need an introductory comma for the student to practice along with practice using a comma with a sentence that uses a person's name. In the Student Interactive, Lesson 4, p. 498, students practice placing commas in the appropriate place. 

Use a comma to set off the words yes and no (e.g., Yes, thank you), to set off a tag question from the rest of the sentence (e.g., It’s true, isn’t it?), and to indicate direct address (e.g., Is that you, Steve?).

  • In Unit 4, Week 4, Writing Workshop, Edit for Punctuation Marks, p. 288, the teacher explains that punctuation marks are used to help clarity and structure of writing with a review of commas and quotation marks. The teacher displays and reads aloud a paragraph with no punctuation marks and engages the students in discussion about the meaning of punctuation marks. The teacher displays the same paragraph with punctuation marks and discusses their function. In the Student Interactive, p. 357, students discuss the function of each way a comma can be used and then editing a dialogue using correct commas and quotation marks.  

Use underlining, quotation marks, or italics to indicate titles of works.

  • In Unit 5, Week 3, Lessons 3 and 4, Reading-Writing Workshop Bridge, Language & Conventions, Punctuating Titles, p. 216, the teacher explains to the students that titles are formatted differently. The teacher uses a visual chart from the Student Interactive, p. 536, to display that titles can be underlined, italicized, or placed in quotation marks. The teacher displays two sentences (titles) for the students to suggest the proper punctuation. Students work in pairs to create their own examples. In the Student Interactive, Lesson 4, p. 536, students review the various ways that titles are represented (books, plays, movies, magazines, etc.) and make edits using underlining and quotations.  

Spell grade-appropriate words correctly, consulting references as needed.

  • In Unit 1, Week , Reading-Writing Workshop Bridge, Spelling, Spell Words with Suffixes, p. 66, Lesson 2 and 3, the teacher explains that some words do not change spelling when adding a suffix, but some do. The teacher models adding the suffixes, -ic, -ism, and -ive, then student change the spelling before adding the suffix. In the Student Interactive, p. 39, students read 20 words with the suffixes and then sort into alphabetical order.

Expand, combine, and reduce sentences for meaning, reader/listener interest, and style.

  • In Unit 1, Week 4, Writing Workshop, Revise by Adding Ideas for Clarity, Minilesson, p. T-280, the teacher explains to students that lack of clarity of words in passages makes writing difficult to comprehend. Passages that contain clear wording helps the reader comprehend the author's meaning, "follow a sequence of events, understand cause-effect relationships, visualize events and make the narrative more interesting and exciting." The teacher reads a passage with specific words removed and replaced with "vague" terms. Students provide their ideas for how the vague words can be improved by using more detailed language, or more precise words. The teacher hands out the passage with the original words included. Students compare the passage they heard containing the vague words with the original passage, then discuss as a class why the original passage has more clarity.
  • In Unit 3, Week 4, Writing Workshop, Revise by Combining Ideas for Clarity, Minilesson, the teacher explains that using transition words in sentences can make writing more concise. The teacher explains how using transition words helps show "relationships between ideas." The teacher lists common transition words. In Student Interactive, p. 153, students rewrite two sentences into one sentence that contains a transitional word or phrase.

Compare and contrast the varieties of English (e.g., dialects, registers) used in stories, dramas, or poems.

  • In Unit 4, Week 1, Lesson 3, Reading-Writing Workshop Bridge, Read Like a Writer, Analyze Dialects, p. T-64, the teacher explains to the students that sometimes authors use atypical spelling, grammar, and/or vocabulary to capture cultural or regional ways people speak. The teacher reads a short dialogue from p. 237 on the Student Interactive containing unusual use of spelling and grammar. The teacher provides a "think aloud" stating how the wording might indicate that the speaker may not have a "formal education." Students write responses to questions about the author's use of unusual spelling and grammar.

Criterion 1o - 1q

Materials in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language targeted to support foundational reading development are aligned to the standards.
6/6
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Criterion Rating Details

Throughout all units, students receive instruction in and practice of phonics, fluency, and word recognition and analysis skills.

Indicator 1o

Materials, questions, and tasks address grade-level CCSS for foundational skills by providing explicit instruction and assessment in phonics and word recognition that demonstrate a research-based progression.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for materials, questions, and tasks address grade-level CCSS for foundational skills by providing explicit instruction and assessment in phonics and word recognition that demonstrate a research-based progression. 

Over the course of the year, students receive phonics and word recognition instruction aligned to grade-level Common Core State Standards for foundational skills. Lessons within each theme include a five-day focus with systematic and explicit teacher instruction, as well as multiple assessment opportunities the teacher can employ. Students are engaged in a variety of activities that allow them to practice introduced phonics skills, including decoding and encoding words and sentences. Assessment types for phonics and word recognition include Baseline, Middle-of-Year, and End-of-Year Tests; Unit Tests; and Progress Check-Ups.

Examples of materials, questions and tasks that address and provide progression of grade-level CCSS for foundational skills through explicit instruction and assessment in phonics and word recognition include, but are not limited to the following:

Materials contain explicit instruction of irregularly spelled words, syllabication patterns, and word recognition consistently over the course of the year. For example:

  • Use combined knowledge of all letter-sound correspondences, syllabication patterns, and morphology (e.g., roots and affixes) to read accurately unfamiliar multisyllabic words in context and out of context.
  • In Unit 1, Week 3, Reading-Writing Workshop Bridge, Word Study, Vowel Teams, Lessons 1 and 2, p. 202, the teacher explains that vowel teams are two or more letters that work together to make a vowel sound. The two vowels can also blend to make one syllable. The practice occurs with the teacher writing four long /i/ words and the students underline the different spellings. In the Student Interactive, p. 114, students read a list of vowel team words, highlighting the vowel team, and then underline the sound the vowel team makes.
  • In Unit 3, Week 1, Lesson 2, Reading-Writing Workshop Bridge, Spelling, Spell Words with Latin Roots, Student Interactive, p. 45, students read, sort, and write a bank of words with Latin roots. The words contain letter-sound correspondences and syllabication patterns already introduced.
  • In Unit 3, Week 1, Lesson 3, Reading-Writing Workshop Bridge, Spelling, Spell Words with Latin Roots, Resource Download Center, p. 94, students generate a written sentence with multisyllabic words containing Latin roots.
  • In Unit 4, Week 5, Lesson 2, p. T-323, Reading Workshop, Shared Read, Possible Teaching Point, students read a passage on a page in the reader looking for the word with a Latin root, appreciative. The teacher models a think aloud explaining that Latin roots are common in many words. The teacher discusses with the students how the Latin meaning relates to the meaning of the word, appreciative.
  • In Unit 5, Week 1, Lesson 1, Reading-Writing Workshop Bridge, p. T68, Academic Vocabulary, Related Words, the teacher explains that related words have the same root or base word, their meanings are related but differ based on their affixes (prefixes and suffixes), and that adding an affix often changes the part of speech. The teacher tells students when encountering an unfamiliar word, study its context for clues to meaning, add affixes to create related words, and make a guess about the meanings and parts of speech of the related words and check your guesses in a dictionary. The teacher models this process. In the Student Interactive, p. 457, students work independently to apply the guess and check strategy to another word from the chart.  

Multiple assessment opportunities are provided over the course of the year to inform instructional adjustments of phonics and word recognition to help students make progress toward mastery. For example:

  • In Unit 2, Week 1, The Progress Check-Ups, there are five multiple choice questions that allow for a quick assessment on Word Study on the student skills in syllables (open and closed syllables). The teacher can support the student using the Progress Check-Ups Teacher’s Manual to provide Opportunities for Remediation with a specific focus/skill using the detailed chart to reteach the student materials that were missed on the checkup.
  • In the Middle-of-Year Test, pp. 40-42, Word Study, several questions prompt students to employ phonics and word recognition skills including prefixes, suffixes, vowel/consonant sounds, multisyllables, Latin roots, and affixes.
  • In the Unit 4 Test, pp. 51-54, Word Study, several questions prompt students to employ phonics and word recognition skills including adding affixes to words and meanings of word parts, including Latin roots.
  • In the End-of-Year Test, pp. 70-72, Word Study, several questions prompt students to employ phonics and word recognition skills including Latin roots, vowel sounds, and multi-syllable breaking rules.

 Materials contain explicit instruction of word solving strategies (graphophonic and syntactic) to decode unfamiliar words. For example:

  • In Unit 1, Week 2, Lesson 2, Reading Workshop, Shared Read, Possible Teaching Point, Word Study, Greek Roots, p. T97, teacher uses the Word Study lesson on pp. T130-T131 in the Reading-Writing Workshop Bridge to underscore that English words often have Greek origins. The teacher points out the word astrobiologist in paragraph two, explains that astro is from the Greek for star, and bio is from the Greek for life. The teacher notes the suffixes -logy and -ist are also from Greek and mean, respectively, “the study of” and “one who.” The teacher leads students to conclude astrobiologist is literally “one who studies life in the stars.”
  • In Unit 2, Week 2, Lesson 1, Reading-Writing Workshop Bridge, Word Study Final Stable Syllables -le, -tion, -sion, p. T136, the teacher models how to say the endings -le, -tion, -sion. The teacher shows examples of words with the target suffixes and how to break apart the example words. Students orally read the words, then read an additional set of words with the target endings.
  • In Unit 3, Week 3, Lesson 1, Reading-Writing Workshop Bridge, Word Study, Unusual Spellings, p. T202, the teacher explains that some words have unusual spellings and that these words cannot be sounded out using common phonics rules. The teacher provides examples using the words, tough and taught. The teacher explains that sometimes the letters gh spell the sound /f/ and sometimes the gh is silent. The students work in small groups to orally generate words where the gh makes the /f/ sound, the gh is silent, and the gh makes the /g/ sound (e.g., spaghetti).

Indicator 1p

Materials, lessons, and questions provide instruction in and practice of word analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected text and tasks.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for materials, lessons, and questions providing instruction in and practice of word analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected text and tasks.

Phonics and word recognition skills are addressed during teacher Minilessons and are practiced multiple times over the course of the five units. Teacher modeling, guided practice, and questioning provide students with the opportunity to practice and master word recognition skills in connected text. Student activities include regular opportunities to practice oral reading with a focus on applying word recognition and analysis skills in leveled readers across diverse genres. Assessments to measure students’ word analysis skills are found throughout all five of the unit assessments with a section on word study. The Baseline, Middle-of-the-Year and End-of-the-Year Assessments include a phonics section. Weekly progress monitoring checks include questions to assess word analysis.

Examples of explicit instruction and student practice of word analysis skills in connected text and tasks include but are not limited to the following:

Multiple and varied opportunities are provided over the course of the year in core materials for students to learn, practice, and apply word analysis skills in connected texts and tasks. For example: 

  • In Unit 1, Week 1, Lesson 2, Reading Workshop, Word Study, the teacher points out the word, interrogate, and explains it means “to question.” The teacher has a student add the suffix -ive to the interrogate. The teacher asks what interrogative means.
  • In Unit 3, Week 5, Reading-Writing Workshop Bridge, Word Study, Syllable Patterns, Lessons 1 and 2, p. 328, the teacher explains strategies to spell and understand multisyllabic words by identifying the syllable type. The teacher describes syllable types: closed, open, VCe, r-controlled, vowel teams, and final stable syllables. Students write three words for each syllable pattern. In Lesson 2, Student Interactive, p. 178, in small groups the students work to divide 10 words into syllables and then check their words in the dictionary.
  • In Unit 4, Week 4, Lesson 1, Reading-Writing Workshop Bridge, Word Study Word Origins, Teach Word Origins, Focus on Strategies, p. T270, Student Interactive, p. 348, students decode a word with Latin origin containing dict. The teacher says the word biography and models how to identify word parts bio and graph, what each word part means and concludes the word’s meaning from the word parts. A student volunteer checks the meaning using the dictionary. Then students identify the word parts in the word, microwave, define the word parts, and define the whole word.
  • In Unit 5, Leveled Readers, How Do We Feed the World?, Word Study: Suffix -ize, p. 4, the teacher reminds the students that recognizing suffixes helps readers decode and know the meaning of unknown words in texts. Students compare two words with the same base word, then discuss the meaning of each, noting the difference based on the addition of the suffix, -ize, in one of the words. 

Materials include word analysis assessment to monitor student learning of word analysis skills. For example: 

  • In Table of Contents, Assessments & Practice, Baseline, Middle-of-Year, End-of-Year Tests, Middle-of-Year Test, Word Study section, pp. 40 - 42, questions assess knowledge of suffixes, Greek roots, syllable division, and syllable types.
  • In Table of Contents, Assessments & Practice, Unit Tests, Teacher Resources, Summative Assessments Teacher Manual with Student Reproducibles, Grade 5, Unit 3 Test, p. T31, the item analysis chart indicates that questions 11 - 20 assess word study. These questions assess words with Latin Roots, suffixes, unusual spellings, and syllable patterns.
  • In Unit 4, Weekly Standards Practice, Word Study, the teacher assesses student learning with a Quick Assessment. Each week, students answer one multiple choice question to show understanding of instruction. Students are assessed on prefixes (pro-, trans-, super-), Greek roots, and Latin roots.
  • In Unit 5, Unit Test, pp. 59-60, several questions are included on the test to assess student phonics skills including identifying orthographic patterns for sounds, syllable division, affixes, and identifying the schwa letter-sound in words.

Indicator 1q

Instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and achieve reading fluency in oral and silent reading, that is, to read on-level prose and poetry with accuracy, rate appropriate to the text, and expression.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and achieve reading fluency in oral and silent reading, that is, to read on-level prose and poetry with accuracy, rate appropriate to the text, and expression.

Over the course of the school year, students are provided weekly opportunities to practice oral reading fluency and silent reading with a focus on developing grade-level reading rate, accuracy, and expression. Students practice oral reading with the teacher as the model during whole group instruction, with student partners, and in small group instruction. In Reading Workshop instruction, within Shared Readings, students read orally in pairs, as a class, and independently with multiple opportunities to reread the same text in first read and close read lessons. Each unit contains 75 informal assessments for measuring individual student skill in oral reading fluency. From the results, three levels of proficiency can be assigned. The teacher is provided guidance about how to utilize the fluency test results.

Opportunities for students to practice and achieve reading fluency in oral and silent reading, through on-level prose and poetry with accuracy, rate appropriate to the text, and expression, are provided.

Multiple opportunities are provided over the course of the year in core materials for students to demonstrate sufficient accuracy and fluency in oral and silent reading and to read grade-level text with purpose and understanding. For example:

  • In Unit 1, Week 1, Lesson 2, Reading Workshop, after previewing vocabulary and First Read Strategies, students may read “The Path to Paper Son” and “Louie Share Kim, Paper Son” independently, in pairs, or as a class.
  • In Unit 4, Leveled Readers, students silently read the story, A Child's Rights, and write notes on a graphic organizer as the teacher checks individual students for comprehension understanding. For this lesson, students listen to the teacher orally read part of the text accurately. The students work with a partner to first silently read a passage to gain meaning, then reread it orally to practice fluency.

Materials support reading or prose and poetry with attention to rate, accuracy, and expression, as well as direction for students to apply reading skills when productive struggle is necessary. Students have opportunities to read grade-level prose and poetry orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression on successive readings. For example:

  • In Unit 1, Leveled Readers, The City of Machu Picchu, p. 4, the teacher explains that scanning a page before reading it is helpful when reading a text that contains unknown words. The teacher tells the students they should look for words they do not know by sight, then use decoding strategies (e.g., read multi-syllable words, syllable by syllable) to sound out the words. The teacher orally reads a page to the students. Students take turns reading pages in the text with a partner and focus on accuracy.
  • In Unit 1, Week 3, Lesson 1, Reading Workshop, p. T158, Historical Fiction, Minilesson, Fluency, students practice their fluency by reading aloud a paragraph from “Rosa’s Journey” or from a historical fiction text. The teacher emphasizes accuracy and appropriate rate. The teacher reads aloud a passage and then reads it together as a class. Students practice reading independently. Students read the passage on their own, and check their fluency, focusing on accuracy and appropriate rate.
  • In Unit 3, Leveled Readers, Missing, p. 4, the teacher reminds the students why it is important to read at an appropriate rate. Students choose a page in the text where they felt they read it slowly. Students partner read the page several times with a focus on appropriate rate of oral reading. One student partner provides feedback to the student reader about how the rate changed after successive readings.
  • In Unit 5, Week 5, Lesson 2, Reading Workshop, students read aloud paragraphs 34-38 of People Should Manage Nature  with a partner to practice fluency. Student focus on accuracy.

Materials support students’ fluency development of reading skills (e.g., self-correction of word recognition and/or for understanding, focus on rereading) over the course of the year (to get to the end of the grade-level band). Students have opportunities to use context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding, rereading as necessary. For example: 

  • In Unit 4, Week 3, Lesson 2, Reading Workshop, Fluency, p. T181, the teacher reminds the students that effective readers self-monitor their reading and self-correct their decoding errors. The students take turns reading a passage focusing on oral reading with accuracy.
  • In Unit 5, Week 5, Lesson 2, Reading Workshop, Shared Reading, p. 316, during the Close Read instruction for fluency the student works with a partner to sound out unknown words and determine their meaning from context clues.

Assessment materials provide teachers and students with information of students’ current fluency skills and provide teachers with instructional adjustments to help students make progress toward mastery of fluency. For example: 

  • The Grade 5 Assessment Guide, Baseline Assessment offers an optional Fluency Test as well as an Optional Fluency Test for Units 1-5 along with an optional End-of-Year Fluency Selection. This assessment has an administering guide, miscue and error guide, and a guide for reading the collected data from the fluency assessment.
  • In Table of Contents, Assessments & Practice, the Summative Assessments Teacher’s Manual with Student Reproducibles, Grade 5, p. T provides information for interpreting fluency test results including a chart with published norms for oral reading fluency. Directions are given for the teacher to examine notes on student’s miscues to determine the reason rates are low. This could indicate further phonics instruction, comprehension strategies, or increased vocabulary exposure is needed. It could indicate a lack of exposure to models of fluent oral reading.
  • In Unit 3, Week 5, On Level Cold Reads for Fluency and Comprehension, the student reads the passage “Life & Art.” This assessment allows the student to be scored for fluency rate. The fluency rubric measures Volume/ Expression, Syntax/Prosody, Accuracy, and Rate. The teacher is provided a chart to identify miscues and errors. The Cold Reads offer three text levels for each unit for each week of developing, on level, and advanced.

Gateway Two

Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

Meets Expectations

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Gateway Two Details

The myView texts are organized around a topic using weekly theme-based essential questions to explore the topic deeply. The questions and tasks included in the units support students as they analyze individual texts as well as the knowledge and ideas shared across multiple texts. Students complete culminating tasks at the end of each unit, however these tasks do not always require students to demonstrate the knowledge they have acquired from their reading.

Cohesive, year-long plans for both vocabulary and writing instruction are found within the materials. Students engage in a spectrum of research projects allowing them to delve more deeply into a topic and to report their findings through their writing.

Criterion 2a - 2h

30/32

Indicator 2a

Texts are organized around a topic/topics (or, for grades 6-8, topics and/or themes) to build students' ability to read and comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that texts are organized around a topic/topics (or, for grades 6-8, topics and/or themes) to build students’ ability to read and comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently. 

Each unit begins with a topic using weekly theme-based Essential Questions to explore the topic deeper. Five texts align and support the topic of the unit as well as multiple Book Club choices students can select. Reading Workshop texts provide another opportunity for students to participate in both Shared and Close Reading in order to complete lesson tasks and the culminating project. A variety of genres are used to explore a weekly question where students analyze, discuss, and synthesize information in order to demonstrate understanding of texts and topics. Each week students are encouraged to reflect and present evidence from multiple texts in order to demonstrate their knowledge gained from the unit tasks. As the year progresses, the complexity of the questions and tasks deepen and ongoing formative assessments allow for differentiation to ensure student proficiency as tasks become more rigorous. 

  • In Unit 1, the Unit Theme is Journeys and the Essential Question is “How do journeys change us?" Each week, a variety of texts are used to address weekly questions related to the theme.
    • In Week 1, students read “The Path to Paper Son” and “Louie Share Kim, Paper Son” and answer the weekly question, “What motivates people to leave home?” 
    • In Week 2, students read Life on Earth-and Beyond and answer the weekly question,“What can scientists discover by traveling to distant places?”
    • In Week 3, students read Pedro's Journal and answer the weekly question, “What can people learn from visiting unknown lands?”  
    • In Week 4, a Poetry Collection is used to answer the weekly question, “What inspires people to start a journey?”
    • In Week 5, students read Picturesque Journeys and answer the weekly question, “How can new places change the way a person sees the world?” 
  • In Unit 3, the Unit Theme is Reflections and the Essential Question is “How do experiences of others reflect our own?” Each week, a variety of texts are used to address weekly questions related to the theme. 
    • In Week 1, students read from Love, Amalia and answer the weekly question, “What can we learn from experience of older generations?” 
    • In Week 2, students read "A Pet for Calvin" and answer the weekly question, “What are some different ways in which people can reach a goal?”
    • In Week 3, students read The Carp and The Hermit Thrush and answer the weekly question, “How are the experiences of people in ancient times similar to those of people in the modern world?” 
    • In Week 4, students use a Poetry Collection to answer the following weekly question, "What can our families teach us about ourselves?" 
    • In Week 5, students read "Life in Art" and answer the weekly question, “How does art reflect people’s experiences?”
  • In Unit 5, the Unit Theme is Systems and the Essential Question is “How do elements of systems change?” Each week, a variety of texts are used to address weekly questions related to the theme.  
    • In Week 1, students read Rocks and Fossils, focuses and answer the weekly question, “How to rocks form and change over time?”
    • In Week 2, students read Earth's Water Cycle and answer the weekly question, “What can cause water to change form?”
    • In Week 3, students read "The Dog of Pompeii" and answer the weekly question, “How can Earth’s changes affect where and how we live?”
    • In Week 4, students read “Let’s Talk Trash” and “It’s Time to Get Serious About Reducing Food Waste, Feds Say” and answer the weekly question, “How do humans create and change cycles?”
    • In Week 5, students read People Should Manage Nature and answer the weekly question, “How much should people try to influence natural systems?”

Indicator 2b

Materials contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language, key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language, key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts.

Throughout the materials, individual and groups of students have a variety of opportunities to build their understanding of the content in various ways within reading, reading-writing, and writing. The directions for student tasks are clear and contain language that relates to the content of the unit. In each unit, students complete questions and tasks that require analysis of individual texts. Every text has text-dependent language support. Each unit contains Reading Workshop lessons with First Read, Close Read, and Reflect and Share sections. During all the first reads, students determine the genre of the text and provide evidence for their decision. Students complete questions and tasks that require analysis of individual texts. Students are provided multiple opportunities to analyze language of stories and passages, identify key ideas and details, and examine the structure of passages, pictures and texts as they relate to the unit topic. In addition to the Reading Workshop, each unit contains a Reading/Writing Bridge that also presents opportunities for students to use their knowledge to demonstrate their understanding of texts and topics. 

Examples include: 

  • In Unit 1, Week 3, students read Pedro’s Journal and use context clues to determine the meaning of unknown words.
  • In Unit 1, Week 5, Lesson 2, Reading Workshop, Picturesque Journeys, students underline a paragraph with a cause-effect chain about Kahlo becoming an artist. 
  • In Unit 2, Week 4, Readers Workshop, when reading the book, Tracking Monsters from Park Scientists by Mary Kay Carson, students answer multiple question: “What is the author’s purpose and message? How does it affect your understanding of the text? Summarize how, where and why researchers study Gila monsters. Underline the parts that show central ideas in the text. Underline details in the section ‘Monstrous Lizards’ that develop a main idea presented earlier in the text. Complete these close read tasks for 'A Place for Frogs.' Underline the parts that show a problem and solution structure. 
  • In Unit 3, Week 2, Reading-Writing Workshop, students analyze the text structure of informational text and determine how the use of text structure contributes to the author’s purpose.
  • In Unit 3, Week 4, Read Like a Writer, students analyze how an author’s use of imagery, literal and figurative language, and sound devices achieve specific purposes, such as creating a mood.
  • In Unit 4, Week 5, Readers Workshop, during the first read of Ezekiall Johnson Goes West by Guy A. Sims, students answer, “How do the author and the illustrator use the setting to influence the plot? Compare and Contrast Ezekiel and Amos. What traits make Ezekiel special?” During the Close Read, students complete different tasks: “To help you understand the author’s and illustrator’s purpose, consider how the images add meaning to the text. Highlight details about the journey west in graphics 31-34. Make an inference about why this is important. Use context clues to determine the meaning of the term, ‘cooped up'."
  • In Unit 5, Week 4, Reading-Writing Bridge, students analyze how the author uses graphics for specific purposes. Students are asked how the graphic achieves the author’s purpose.

Indicator 2c

Materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the criteria that materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts.

Units center around a topic with embedded text-dependent questions. Students work with multiple texts throughout the materials and are required to analyze information, build knowledge, and demonstrate understanding of material, often using discussion, graphic organizers, constructed responses, and written text types that draw upon textual evidence by identifying key details and comparing/contrasting texts. The curriculum scaffolds the skills of responding and varies in the types of response, in both Reading Workshop and Reading-Writing Bridge. The tasks, questions, and prompts integrate the students’ knowledge of the topic, weekly question, and identified text or texts. Instructional materials build upon the depth of knowledge that students need to access and analyze materials. However, questions students engage with do not consistently promote deeper understanding of the text, and the teacher may need to revise to assure students have access to more than just cursory text-focused items.

Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Week 2, Reading Workshop, students answer, “How might learning about Earth help us learn more about the universe? Use examples from the texts you have read this week to write and support a response.”
  • In Unit 1, Week 5, Reading Workshop, the Formative Assessment states, “Have students use evidence from this week’s texts to give a short presentation about how location affects people’s lives. Have students use eye contact to communicate their ideas effectively.”
  • In Unit 2, Week 3, Reading Workshop, Compare Texts, students use text evidence from Hatchet, “Perfect Inspiration,” and “A Pinhole Camera” to explain how careful observations can help people survive. 
  • In Unit 3, Week 3, students read the legend, The Carp by Marie Yuen, and drama, The Hermit Thrush by Dana Crum, to answer the question, “How are the experiences of people in ancient times similar to those of the modern world?” The Student Interactive, page 114 states, “In this unit, you have read about characters and their experiences. Compare and contrast the texts you have read this week. Do people from different times and cultures share challenges and experiences?”
  • In Unit 3, Week 4, Reading Workshop, students read various poems during the week. The Student Interactive, page 142 states, “In this poetry collection, two different poets describe their thoughts on family. What different themes and ideas do they use? Choose two poems you have read about this week. Then use specific ideas from the texts to write and support a response."
  • In Unit 5, Week 2, students read an excerpt from the informational text, Earth’s Water Cycle by Diane Dakers, to answer the question, “What can cause water to change form?” Lesson 5 of the Reading Workshop Formative Assessment states, “Have students choose the most important details from Earth’s Water Cycle to use as evidence as they summarize what they’ve learned about the water cycle.”
  • In Unit 5, Week 4, informational texts, Let’s Talk Trash by USDA and It’s time to get Serious about Reducing Food Waste, Feds Say by NPR, are used as students explore the question, “How do human actions create and change cycles?” The Student Interactive, page 558 states, “Consider the texts you have read this week. What do they say about how the food system works in our society? Analyze the texts by comparing and contrasting the problems and solutions they face.”

Indicator 2d

The questions and tasks support students' ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic (or, for grades 6-8, a theme) through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that the questions and tasks support students’ ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic (or, for grades 6-8, a theme) through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).

Reading and modeling of narrative, biography, informational, and opinion texts are included throughout the materials. Many culminating tasks rely on students’ ability to synthesize their understanding and use learned skills to present their knowledge in reading, writing, speaking, and listening tp demonstrate knowledge built from the texts. All units contain a Project-Based Inquiry task with an Area of Focus, where students compare across texts, include inquiry research, and have peer collaboration and discussions. The teacher may need to provide some extra support to assure students are focusing on the content as well as demonstrating writing or speaking skills.

Examples include, but are not limited to:

    • In Unit 1, Week 6, students answer the unit Essential Question, “How do journeys change us?” After answering the question, students complete a culminating task creating an argumentative travel brochure. The brochure will be presented to the class. During completion of the project, students engage in research and multiple discussions with a peer. In preparation for this task students engage in weekly discussions following their shared read, building knowledge and skills to complete the culminating task. 
    • In Week 1, students read “The Path to Paper Son” and “Louie Share Kim, Paper Son” and discuss what makes people leave a place they call home. 
    • In Week 2, students read Life on Earth-and Beyond and then discuss what scientists can discover by traveling to distant places. 
    • In Week 3, students read Pedro’s Journal and discuss what people can learn from traveling to far off places. 
    • In Week 4, students read a poetry collection and discuss what inspires people to start a new journey. 
    • In Week 5, students read Picturesque Journeys and discuss how new places can change the way a person sees the world.
  • In Unit 2, the unit Essential Question is “How do we learn through our observations?” Each of the five weeks have text with a question that connects to the Unit Essential Question. Some examples include:
    • In Week 1, “How can careful observation help a person survive?” Students read an excerpt from Hatchet. 
    • In Week 6, the Project Focus is to write a Survival Guide. A four-point rubric is provided for the project. The topics are Focus, Research, Organization and Development, Language and Vocabulary, and Delivery. The delivery of the project is an oral presentation where a four is, “Delivery, including eye contact, speaking rate, and volume, is effective.”  
  • In Unit 3, Week 6 students answer the unit Essential Question, “How do the experiences of others reflect our own?” After answering the question, students write a speech honoring someone who impacted them. The speech will be presented to the class. During completion of the project, students engage in research and multiple discussions with a peer. In preparation for this task, students engage in weekly discussions following their shared read, building knowledge and skills to complete the culminating task. 
    • In Week 1, students read Love, Amalia and discuss what we can learn from the experiences of older generations. 
    • In Week 2, students read “A Pet for Calvin” and discuss different ways people can reach a goal. 
    • In Week 3, students read The Carp and the Hermit Thrush and discuss how the experiences of people in ancient times are similar to the experiences of people in modern times. 
    • In Week 4, students read a poetry collection and discuss what our families can teach us about ourselves. 
    • In Week 5, students read “Life and Art” and discuss how art reflects people’s experiences.
  • In Unit 4, Week 6, Project-Based Inquiry, the Teacher's Edition states, “This week students will address the theme of liberty by conducting a survey about what freedom means to others. The students will develop a project of their own, such as a speech or a poster, about what it means to be free.” In Week 5, Writing Workshop Assessment, the directions state, “Write a science fiction story about a group of people who work together to achieve freedom. Describe why they want and need freedom, how they work together to achieve it, and what challenges and struggles they overcome.” This activity is the culmination of the Minilessons throughout Weeks 1-4 of the unit’s Writing Workshop.  They include:
    • In Week 1, Writing Workshop, students begin with a Genre Immersion Lesson: Organize a Science Fiction Story, and Analyze Characters and Settings. Students then complete the following lessons: “Analyze Plot, Set a Purpose, and Plan Your Science Fiction Story.”
    • In Week 2, Writing Workshop, the lessons are Develop Characters, Develop Setting, Develop the Conflict, Develop the Resolution, Develop Dialogue.
    • In Week 3, Writing Workshop, the lessons are Organize an Introduction, Organize a Sequence of Events, Choose Pacing of Events, Develop the Plot, Select a Different Genre.
    • In Week 4, Writing Workshop, the lessons are Edit for Prepositions and Prepositional Phrases, Edit for Irregular Verbs, Edit for Collective Nouns, Edit for Subordinating Conjunctions, Edit for Punctuation Marks.
  • In Unit 5, Week 6 students answer the unit Essential Question, “How do elements of systems change?” After answering the question, students complete a culminating task creating a Public Service Announcement after researching a natural disaster. The project will be presented to the class. During completion of the project, students engage in research and multiple discussions with a peer. In preparation for this task, students engage in weekly discussions following their shared read, building knowledge and skills to complete the culminating task. 
    • In Week 1, students read Rocks and Fossils and discuss how rocks form and change over time. 
    • In Week 2, students read Earth’s Water Cycle and discuss what can cause water to change form. 
    • In Week 3, students read The Dog of Pompeii and discuss how Earth’s changes can affect where and how we live. 
    • In Week 4, students read “Let’s Talk Trash” and “It’s Time to Get Serious About Reducing Food Waste, Feds Say” and discuss how humans create and change cycles. 
    • In Week 5, students read People Should Manage Nature and discuss how much people should try to control nature.

Indicator 2e

Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts. 

Academic vocabulary is introduced, defined, discussed, and presented throughout unit reading and writing tasks. Students preview vocabulary before reading the text; the teacher asks questions to determine what students know before reading and to activate prior knowledge. Questions and activities that focus on the unit academic vocabulary words are embedded in the materials. There is a “Possible Teacher Point” during the Shared Read where teachers can use the Reading Writing Workshop Bridge to reinforce a vocabulary skill. During the Shared Read, students use context clues to determine the meaning of words. After the Shared Read, there is Develop Vocabulary time where students have an opportunity to apply their knowledge with the words they have learned in independent practices. Each unit is built around a specific topic allowing for the building of related vocabulary exposure, meaning, and connections to be made throughout the weeks of instruction, increasing students’ word knowledge across texts. 

  • In Unit 1, Week 2, Reading Workshop, Respond and Analyze, Develop Vocabulary, students learn that authors choose certain words to convey information about scientific concepts. Students learn the words, astrobiologists, microbes, colony, sensors, radiation, and rovers, to help readers understand the texts. Students then use the newly acquired vocabulary to answer questions about the text and make connections between the vocabulary words.
  • In Unit 2, Week 2, Possible Teaching Point, Academic Vocabulary/Synonyms, the directions state, “Use the Academic Vocabulary lesson on pages T134-T135 in the Reading Writing Workshop Bridge to underscore how knowing synonyms and antonyms can give students a clearer understanding of the meaning of unfamiliar words. Ask for synonyms of the words sensitive, diversity, and comeback (all vocabulary words) which appear on page 259.”
  • In Unit 3, Week 4, Reading Workshop, Respond and Analyze, Develop Vocabulary, students learn that certain words convey information and create mental images about a character or a scene. Key vocabulary words are vivid, retired, trembles, crinkled, and melodic. Students note how these words tell about the characters and settings in the Poetry Collection. Students use the newly acquired vocabulary, as they respond to questions about the poetry.
  • In Unit 4, Week 6, the Student Interactive states, “In this unit you learned many words related to the theme of Liberty. Work with your partner to add more academic vocabulary words to each category. If appropriate, use these words when you create your project on the meaning of freedom.”
  • In Unit 5, Week 1, Reading Workshop, Respond and Analyze, Develop Vocabulary, students learn that authors of informational texts use domain-specific words to inform readers about their topics. Students learn the words, minerals, particles, deposits, erosion, and principles, as used in the field of geology. Students demonstrate an understanding of the words by answering questions, using the newly acquired vocabulary and writing with the words to show their understanding of the rock cycle.

Indicator 2f

Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan to support students' increasing writing skills over the course of the school year, building students' writing ability to demonstrate proficiency at grade level at the end of the school year.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials include a cohesive, year-long plan to support students’ increasing writing skills over the course of the school year, building students’ writing ability to demonstrate proficiency at grade level at the end of the school year.

The Writing Workshop component has a weekly format that remains consistent in each unit throughout the year. Students are exposed to standards-based writing skill Minilessons that support progress toward independent writing. Lessons include modeled writing, shared writing, guided writing, and independent writing. In Week 1 of each unit, students are immersed in and introduced to a genre of writing. In Week 2, students work on developing the elements of that genre. Week 3 concentrates on developing the structure of the writing. Week 4 contains lessons in author’s craft. Week 5 focuses on publishing, celebrating and assessing. The daily routines for each lesson contain a five to 15 minute Minilesson with 30-40 minutes of independent writing time, during which the teacher confers with students. During this time, students practice and refine their writing skills. Although the lesson format remains the same throughout the year, the Minilessons progress and students consistently learn more skills in order to demonstrate proficiency at grade level by the end of the school year. A gradual release model is used each week. The teacher models writing and think alouds first to demonstrate the writing skills students need for the writing type. Next, students engage in shared writing, guided writing, and lastly, independent writing of the specific writing genre for the unit. As students develop their writing skills throughout the unit, they complete a writing prompt assessment that measures their ability to independently complete a written assignment that assesses all of the writing skills upon which they have been building. Examples include:

  • In Unit 1, Weeks 1-5, Writing Workshop, students focus on personal narratives. During Week 1, students analyze a personal narrative to explore the elements of the genre. Students also explore the narrator’s relationships with other characters and analyze the setting and sequence of events in a narrative text, before brainstorming a topic and planning their own personal narrative. In Week 2, students develop their writing, working on skills such as engaging ideas, specific and sensory details, point of view, and dialogue. In Week 3, students continue developing their personal narratives by working on their introduction, sequence of events, transitions, and conclusion. Students also revise their work to ensure that important events are included. In Week 4, students revise and edit their work, focusing on using comparative and superlative adjectives, conjunctive adverbs, indefinite pronouns, as well as adding and deleting ideas for clarity. In Week 5, students finish their revisions and edits by rearranging and combining ideas and checking their work for subject-verb agreement in simple and compound sentences. After students publish and celebrate their work, they complete the end-of-unit writing assessment, during which students write a personal narrative in response to a prompt.             
  • In Unit 2, Weeks 1-5, Writers Workshop, students work on informational text, specifically informational articles. In Week 1, after analyzing an informational article and its elements, such as the lead paragraph, students identify details in photographs using a classroom library text, set a purpose for their writing, and plan to write their own informational article. In Week 2, students begin to develop their drafts, focusing on crafting engaging ideas and including specific facts and concrete details, such as definitions, quotations, and examples. Students also use a checklist to assist them with selecting visuals to use in their informational article. In Week 3, students continue the composition portion of the writing, concentrating on their introduction and conclusion, how their paragraphs are organized, transitions, and use of formatting, such as headings, bulleted lists, bold words, and italics. In Week 4, as students revise and edit their work, they ensure their drafts use precise language, domain-specific vocabulary, and correct verb tense. They edit their work for conjunctive adverbs, simple and compound sentences, and prepositions and prepositional phrases. In Week 5, students wrap up their editing, focusing on punctuation marks and capitalization, and publish and celebrate their work afterwards. Then, students complete the end-of-unit writing assessment by writing an informational article in response to a prompt.          
  • In Unit 3, Weeks 1-5, Writing Workshop, students learn about opinion writing. In Week 1, students analyze an opinion essay to understand the genre’s organization and elements, including point of view, reasons, and information. They also brainstorm a topic and opinion and begin planning their own opinion essay. In Week 2, students begin composing their pieces. They develop an opinion, reasons, facts, and details and include graphic features in their work. Students also use a list of options and a checklist to select a technology idea that they would like to try when producing their work. In Week 3, students continue draft development. Students develop their introduction, conclusion, reasons, and supporting information and include transition words, phrases, and clauses in their writing. They also format their paragraphs using headings for organizational purposes and engage in a group activity where they use technology to research an opinion essay on a topic of interest. In Week 4, students begin to edit and revise their work, checking their writing for capitalization and proper formatting and punctuation when citing sources. They also rearrange and combine ideas for clarity and participate in peer editing. In Week 5, students complete their final revisions and edits, focusing on incorporating peer and teacher suggestions in their work and capitalization. After students publish and celebrate their work, they prepare for the end-of-unit writing assessment, during which they write an opinion essay in response to a prompt.     
  • In Unit 4, Weeks 1-5, Writing Workshop, students explore the science fiction genre. In Week 1, students examine the elements and organization of science fiction and use text to analyze characters, setting, and plot, before setting a purpose and planning their own science fiction story. In Week 2, as students begin to compose their drafts, they focus on developing the characters, setting, conflict, resolution, and dialogue. In Week 3, students continue crafting their compositions. They organize their introduction and sequence of events, choose the pacing of their story events, develop the plot, and explain to a peer how their story would change if it were written in a different genre. In Week 4, students edit their work, concentrating on prepositions and prepositional phrases, irregular verbs, collective nouns, subordinating conjunctions, commas, and quotation marks. In Week 5, students revise their writing by adding and deleting ideas for clarity and edit for indefinite pronouns. After students publish and celebrate their work, they prepare for the end-of-unit writing assessment, during which students write a science fiction short story in response to a prompt.     
  • In Unit 5, Weeks 1-5, Writing Workshop, students study poetry. In Week 1, students are introduced to the three major kinds of poems before they analyze a familiar poem. Students also delve into what poetry sounds and looks like, before brainstorming ideas as they plan to write their own poetry. In Week 2, students practice seeing like a poet, ensuring that they use precise words and sensory details in their writing. They also practice using rhythm and rhyme, personification, similes and metaphors, and interjections in their drafts. In Week 3, students turn their attention to crafting their poetry, working on skills such as choosing line breaks, developing stanzas, using punctuation to create pauses and other rhythms, developing a rhyme scheme, and rewriting portions of their work for precise meaning. In Week 4, students explore poetic license and its effects, as well as the impact of trying a new approach (i.e., rewriting poetry in a different genre). They also edit their work for subordinating conjunctions and adjectives, format titles properly, and show emphasis. In Week 5, students finish editing, concentrating on collective nouns and irregular verbs. After they publish and celebrate their writing, students complete an end-of-unit writing assessment, during which they write a poem in response to a prompt.

Indicator 2g

Materials include a progression of focused research projects to encourage students to develop knowledge in a given area by confronting and analyzing different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and source materials.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials include a progression of focused research projects to encourage students to develop knowledge in a given area by confronting and analyzing different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and source materials.

Each unit has an Essential Question which is supported by a theme, additional weekly essential questions, and a variety of multi-genre texts. During Week 6, a Project-Based Inquiry task occurs using anchor texts, Book Club texts, and additional research. Students work both independently and collaboratively to complete this project. It is within the Project-Based Inquiry that students research and develop applicable “real world” products, such as opinion letters, scrapbooks, speeches, informational posters, and brochures. In order to complete these projects based on the theme of the unit, students are required to research, analyze, and synthesize information for this culminating activity. Throughout the Workshops in the weeks building to the final project, students engage in a progression of tasks that build their knowledge through reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills. 

  • In Unit 1, Week 6, Project-Based Inquiry, there are five lessons. “Lesson 1: Gather background information from research articles; Lesson 2: Use the navigation toolbar at the top of a Web page and a site map at the bottom to narrow a search; Lesson 3: Use quoting and paraphrasing to refine research; Lesson 4: Write a business letter requesting more information; Lesson 5: Present and reflect on research results.” The Teacher’s Edition states, “This week, students will address the theme of Journeys by researching collaboratively and writing a travel guide about a country they would like to visit. Have students demonstrate understanding of information gathered on their chosen country by beginning a first draft of their travel guides. As students begin writing, be sure they can identify which country they chose, give details related to culture, such as language and food, and tell how they might organize the guide.” 
  • In Unit 2, the Essential Question is “How do we learn through our observations?” During Week 6, students use knowledge from the anchor texts, Book Club, and additional research to complete a research-based project connecting to the theme, Observations. Students conduct research on national parks, nature, weather, and survival before completing the final project, which is a survival guide. The project is broken into five separate lessons. A four-point rubric scale is provided for students and teachers to understand the components needed on the final culminating, research project.
  • In Unit 3, Week 6, Project-Based Inquiry, there are five lessons. “Lesson 1: Gather background information from research articles; Lesson 2: Use databases to conduct research; Lesson 3: Use a bibliography to refine research; Lesson 4: Use photographs and time lines to extend research; Lesson 5: Present and reflect on research results.” The Teacher’s Edition states, “This week students will reflect on the theme, Reflections, by collaboratively researching and writing a speech about a person or hero who has had an impact on their lives. Have students brainstorm the photographs they would like to include in their writing, as well as the most important events they would include on a timeline. Remind students that when using photographs, they should cite the print or online source from which they obtained the images.”
  • In Unit 4, Week 6, Project-Based Inquiry, students research, survey others, and write a speech or create a poster on the meaning of freedom. Students read Experiencing Freedom, Thomas Paine’s Legacy, and You Can Quote Me!, and they complete independent research, including doing an online survey. Students then write their speech or create a poster that is presented to their classmates.
  • In Unit 5, Week 6, Project-Based Inquiry, there are five lessons. “Lesson 1: Gather background information from research articles; Lesson 2: Use their research to create graphics; Lesson 3: Refine their research by developing a bibliography; Lesson 4: Use media to extend research; Lesson 5: Present and reflect on research results.” The Teacher’s Edition states, “This week students will address the theme of Systems by collaboratively researching and writing a script for a public service announcement (PSA). They will research ways people can help the environment and create positive changes in one of Earth’s systems.” The Student Interactive states, “With your partner, think of two graphs you might create to support your claim. Consider the type of information you have and the best way to display it. Take notes in the charts to plan your research.”

Indicator 2h

Materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.

The materials provide opportunities for students to use anchor texts and Book Club texts during Reading Workshop. Leveled Readers support the instruction for the unit and student’s comprehension. Reading supports are available in the Getting Started Program Overview to assist teachers in guiding students to become independent readers. In the beginning of each Introduce the Unit section, the Student Interactive contains an Independent Reading Log, in which students track the date, book, genre, pages read, and minutes read. There is also a place called My Rating, in which students rate the book using a star system. Additionally, students conference with the teacher for three to five minutes at different points each week to discuss specific aspects of what they are reading. Book Club meets twice a week during Small Group time. Students complete an information sheet for Book Club that they use when meeting with their group. Students are expected to finish reading their Book Club book within 10 days. Students document their noticings, connections, and wonderings about their Book Club book daily. There are lessons for free reads that guide students and teachers during independent reading and a pacing guide and lessons for Book Club. Students are to read their Book Club book outside and inside of class in order to keep up with session requirements.

  • In Unit 2, Introduce the Unit, Independent Reading, students are introduced to independent reading goals for the unit. Students self-select texts that are on nonfiction topics they find interesting, choose a goal, and establish purpose for independent reading. Students complete an Independent Reading Log using the Student Interactive each time they read recording the date, book, genre, pages read, minutes read, and their rating for the book. Students are encouraged to set a goal for themselves for independent reading and write the goal on their log.
  • In Unit 4, Week 1, Reading Workshop, teachers confer with students about their independent historical fiction reading. Students share what they have learned about the setting, characters, and plot in their book. In Week 4, Reading Workshop, Assess and Differentiate, students can reread or listen to Delivering Justice or another text they have previously read, read a self-selected trade book or their Book Club text, or support their partners in developing a summary of a passage they read in their book.
  • In Unit 5, Unit Introduction, Independent Reading, the Student Interactive states, “In this unit you will read assigned texts with your teacher. You will also self-select texts to read independently. Follow these steps to evaluate and respond to books you read on your own.” In Week 4, Independent Reading, the Teacher's Edition states, “Students can read a self-selected trade book, read or listen to a previously read leveled reader or selection, [or] begin reading their Book Club text or one of the texts from the suggested titles on page T377.”

Gateway Three

Usability

Meets Expectations

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Gateway Three Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectations for instructional supports and usability indicators. Although the materials are well designed, the pacing of daily lessons is not appropriate. The materials support teacher learning and understanding of the Standards, as well as offer teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards. Teachers are provided with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards. The materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, and digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms. However, the overall web platform presents several navigational challenges and can be difficult to navigate when searching for resources or program components.

Criterion 3a - 3e

5/8
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Criterion Rating Details

Materials are thoughtfully designed and include copious review and practice resources that support students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject without visual distractions. Suggested timing for lessons and units may not be adequate for the teacher to fully teach included materials at a pace that will allow for maximum student understanding.

The program provides documentation that demonstrates the alignment of the questions, tasks, and assessments to the standards.

Indicator 3a

Materials are well-designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing.
0/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 5 do not meet the criteria that materials are well designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing.

Materials and lessons are well designed. Careful attention to time allotments may be necessary to ensure all portions of the lesson are taught. In the Getting Started Guide, times are listed for each component of these lessons and suggested instructional minutes for them. The lessons are sequenced to incorporate Reading Workshop, Reading and Writing Workshop Bridge, Small Group/Independent, and Writing Workshop. Materials also include a Suggested Weekly Plan that outlines instructional minutes for each section; however, materials may not consistently provide adequate suggested instructional time for the amount of content included within each section.

Each daily lesson format is broken apart into Reading Workshop, Writing Workshop, and Reading-Writing Bridge Workshop sections. Suggestions for instructional minutes are as follows:

    • Shared Reading: 35-50 minutes
    • Reading Bridge: 5-10 minutes
    • Small Group/Independent: 20-30 minutes
    • Writing Workshop Minilesson: 10 minutes
    • Independent Writing: 30-40 minutes
    • Writing bridge: 5-10 minutes

Total time for whole group instruction (reading and writing) 80-110 minutes and small group instruction is 55-70 minutes.

Indicator 3b

The teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the criteria that the teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.

While the materials are well-designed and lessons are effectively structured, the pacing of individual lessons may not provide time for maximum student understanding. The materials have five units. Each of those units are designed for one lesson a day, five lessons per week over six weeks of instruction. There is a pacing guide available in the Teacher's Edition, and the Suggested Weekly Plan provides a breakdown of the program’s allocation of instructional minutes. Teachers may need to make instructional adjustments to ensure all students are working towards mastery of core content with the suggested timing.

Indicator 3c

The student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (e.g., visuals, maps, etc.).
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that the student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (e.g., visuals, maps, etc.).

The Student Interactive book provides clear directions and explanations with a visual design and structure that is student-friendly and easy to navigate. Each unit has its own section that digitally opens into a Unit Introduction, complete with an Essential Question and links to the Unit Introduction Activities and Independent Reading. After the Unit Introduction, each week has a drop down menu that links to the Reading Workshop, Reading-Writing Bridge, and Writing Workshop. Each section is clearly labeled and often accompanied by a graphic or photograph. The Student Interactive includes a digital notebook that allows students to preview vocabulary, check for understanding, note taking, and more. The Teacher's Edition effectively models the thinking and process for many lessons, which students then practice and reflect on/review with peers. There are also Quick Checks that provide additional review or practice for students who need it and extension for those who have demonstrated the skill. Directions in the Student Interactive are easy to understand and clearly labeled for understanding. However, some response boxes in the consumable worksheets are not large enough to provide adequate space for students to respond.

  • The Student Interactive states, “As you read, mark places where the setting or plot changes. Then, use what you marked to analyze the author’s choices in the text. Go back to the Close Read notes and highlight evidence that shows the setting influences the story. Use your highlighted evidence to complete the chart.”
  • In Unit 3, Week 2, students continue their work with poetry. There is a reference aid for hyperbole and pun included in the Read Like a Writer section of the Student Interactive. This reference aid provides a model text excerpt with the hyperbole and pun highlighted and labeled, as well as a brief explanation and analysis of the model. 

Indicator 3d

Materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessments.

The materials include publisher alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessments. The Getting Started guide includes a Planning Resources section that breaks down the Common Core Correlation for the Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts and Literacy. The Planning Resources section contains a two column document that lists the standard and aligns the standard by page numbers with where it is taught in the Teacher's Edition, as well as Student Interactive. In addition to this resource, each lesson in the Teacher's Edition states the objective of the lesson, along with the standard to which it aligns. The Student Interactive also provides a learning goal with each lesson, written as "I can" statements that match the standards. The materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by assessments, as well. 

  • The objective of a lesson in the Teacher's Edition states, “Recognize and analyze literary elements within and across increasingly complex traditional, contemporary, classical and diverse texts in literature.”
  • For Weekly Assessments, there are also, “Weekly Standards Practice PowerPoint® Presentations: Grades 2-5. Project these as exit tickets to immediately assess students’ understanding. Multiple-choice practice for: • Academic Vocabulary • Word Study • Language and Conventions.”
  • Under Teacher Resources, there is a CCSS Correlations. This is a chart providing the CCSS and what lessons they can be found in within the program. “English Language Arts and Reading: Grade 5. READING: LITERATURE Key Ideas and Details. RL.5.1 Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. SI*: Unit 1, Week 3, 111 / TE**: Unit 1, Week 3, T192–T193 *SI = Student Interactive **TE = Teacher's Edition”

Indicator 3e

The visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the criteria that the visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.

The student digital materials provide instruction, lessons, links, and a digital notebook for students to engage in the instruction and demonstrate their work. While these student materials are clearly labeled through units, weeks, and drop-down links, at times it can be challenging to navigate to previous screens and or refer back to materials while responding to questions and discussions. No clear directions are present to help students navigate from one page to the next. Some page change arrows do not function properly and the long time it takes pages to load could frustrate and distract some students. The digital images, graphics, labels, illustrations, and maps are well represented in a visual manner that is not distracting or chaotic allowing students to engage in the material. The Teacher's Edition can be more challenging to navigate as there is a lot of information, sections, guides, plans; the layout of resource materials is vast and can be overwhelming. 

  • The Reading Workshop is located in the column on the right side and includes First Read, Close Read, and Reflect and Share. The Workshop icons take up about one quarter of the webpage, is small in size, and may be difficult for students to navigate and read.
  • In Unit 1, Week 1, Weekly Interactive, students open the page and click on a map of the United States. The directions state, “Click on Ellis Island and Angel Island to learn more about the people who came to the United States through those places.” However, neither island is labeled and there are just two big blue dots representing these places. 
  • In Unit 4, Week 5, Reading Workshop, “Ezekiel Johnson Goes West”, students read an 87-paned graphic story vertically. Students must scroll up and down to go back and reread or visualize a pane. 

Criterion 3f - 3j

Materials support teacher learning and understanding of the Standards.
7/8
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Criterion Rating Details

The Teacher Edition and accompanying materials provide guidance for instruction, including establishing classroom protocols and information to support reteaching/remediation. Resources are included for communicating with stakeholders about the program and ways to support student progress at home.

Ample professional learning resources are included to support teachers with instruction, including information connecting lessons to the standards and the role of research-based strategies within the program. However, the role of the standards in the overall development of the materials is unclear.

Indicator 3f

Materials contain a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials contain a Teacher's Edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.

The teacher materials include guidance on establishing protocols, detailed information on presenting materials to students, and annotations on what to do if students need further assistance in understanding material.

The Program Overview for each unit provides the teacher with the outline in the resources, their purpose, and guides in using them. In addition, for each lesson within the unit, there are guides on how to implement the lesson and provide support to the students, as well as additional resources. In the Getting Started section, each grade level provides additional resources to support both the teacher and student.

  • In Unit 2, Week 2, Reading Workshop, Listening Comprehension, the teacher is provided guidance for introducing text: “Tell students you are going to read aloud an informational text. Have students listen as you read ‘The Manatees’ Future is Looking Brighter.’ Explain that students should listen actively, paying careful attention to facts and details about the subject. Prompt them to ask questions to clarify information and follow agreed-upon discussion rules.”
  • In Unit 4, Week 4, Reading Workshop, Shared Read, Generate Questions: the teacher is provided guidance in reading text with students: “Have students can paragraphs 7-9. Remind them to ask questions as they read about why characters make certain choices. Have them highlight details about Westley’s motivation.”

Indicator 3g

Materials contain a teacher's edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials contain a teacher’s edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.

The materials contain a Professional Development Center with videos and white papers that contain advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject. Professional Learning videos are provided to give teachers the research behind the series and enhance teaching practices. These materials are authored by the authors and researchers of the program and provide teachers with best practices. Examples include:

  • In Reading there are four video offerings: “Isolated vs. Integrated Skills Instruction in Texts to Improve Comprehension,” “Organizing the Literacy Block and the Reading Workshop Part 1,” “Organizing the Literacy Block and the Reading Workshop Part 2,” and “What is Integrated Skills Instruction?” The White Papers included are “Text Complexity Systems: A Teacher’s Toolkit” and “The Reading Workshop.”
  • In Vocabulary, there are two video offerings: “How to Start Teaching a Generative Vocabulary Approach” and “What is a Generative Approach to Vocabulary Instruction?” These videos are both authored by Elfrieda “Freddy” Hiebert, Ph.D.

The Professional Development Tab contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary. Categories include Assessment, Book Club, Comprehension & Assessment, Differentiation, Dual Language, Engagement, Foundational Skills, Inquiry, Reading, Small Group, and Vocabulary.

Indicator 3h

Materials contain a teacher's edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the criteria that materials contain a Teacher's Edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.

Although the instructional materials contain a correlations document stating which standards are covered in each lesson, there are no explanations of the role the literacy standards play in the context or development of the curriculum. There is no connection between materials from the previous grade level or indication of how it builds towards future standards. 

In the Getting Started with myView, there is a document titled, “CCSS Correlations Grade 5,” where the CCSS have been aligned with the curriculum. The Grade 5 Workshop Resources state that materials “Teach the standards with comprehensive print and digital Reading and Writing Workshop resources.”

Indicator 3i

Materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials contain an explanation of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research based strategies.

There are multiple explanations of instructional approaches in the materials. The small group guide provides explanations of how the curriculum uses small groups to meet student needs and support for teachers in how to implement the groups. In the Getting Started section, there are explanations of the instructional approaches. The Assessment Guide provides further explanations of the approaches implemented in the curriculum. A document titled Teacher's Edition Lesson Walkthrough provides an outline to what to teach, how to teach, and why. The explanations are brief in why a lesson is conducted to support student learning. Also, in Getting Started, there is a document titled ELL Support, which outlines what a teacher should do to support his/her ELL students at Emerging, Developing, Expanding, and Bridging throughout the curriculum. This is a brief overview of how a teacher can support this group(s) of students.

Indicator 3j

Materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.

The Assessment Guide provides Family-Home Connection letters for each unit. These guides offer information to parents about what the students are studying at school and suggestions on how to support student learning at home.

  • In Unit 1, a letter to parents includes an overview of the unit: “How do journeys change us? What can people learn from visiting unknown lands? In this unit, students address these questions and others by reading informational text. They also read historical fiction and poetry about journeys. After learning from their reading, they write their own personal narratives. Ways to Help Your Child: When you talk about this unit’s activities, the following topics and questions may help start the conversation. How is historical fiction different than realistic fiction? Tell me about your Book Club book.”
  • In Unit 4, a letter to parents provides suggestions on how to discuss your child's reading with students. Parents are told: "When you talk about this unit’s activities, the following topics and questions may help start the conversation: How is historical fiction different than realistic fiction? Tell me about your Book Club book."

Criterion 3k - 3n

Materials offer teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards.
8/8
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Criterion Rating Details

Regular assessment opportunities for formative and summative assessments, including regular progress monitoring, are woven throughout the program. Assessment clearly indicate which standards are emphasized and provide sufficient guidance for using assessment data to inform instruction. The materials provide accountability for independent reading based on student choice and interest.

Indicator 3k

Materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress.

The materials contain formative assessments that are integrated into daily routines and provide informal opportunities to measure student understanding through Quick Checks, Observational Assessments, Conferring Checklists, Rubrics, and Assess Understanding sections of the lessons. Progress Check-ups are available and designed to measure student progress of the standards. Summative assessments also occur throughout the year. Students are given a baseline at the beginning of the year, which is followed up with mid-year and end-of year assessments. Unit tests to assess the standards taught in each unit in reading comprehension and writing are provided for each unit. 

The Small Group Guide lists options and the purpose for each assessment:

  • Progress Check-ups: Assess skills taught that week. Monitors progress to intervene as needed.
  • Weekly Standards Practice: Given at the end of a lesson as an "exit ticket" to check students’ knowledge of specific literary skills.
  • Unit Tests: Assess the key skills from each week’s instruction in the unit.
  • End of Year Test: Gives a summative view of a student’s progress for the year.

Through Examview, teachers can create Cold Reads, Progress Check-ups, and Unit Tests using questions from a bank or creating their own. Teachers can also choose from multiple choice, multiple response, and essays, or include all three. The program offers both English and Spanish. Additionally, teachers can monitor and track student progress within Examview.

The Assessment Guide states: “Once you have collected the data, it is time for action. Set aside some time to organize your observational notes by student. Review them and think about what they tell you about individual students. Ask yourself questions like these: Is this student making progress in this small group? Do I need to assign this student to a different group? Do I need to change the way I am instructing this student? Do I need to change the texts this student is reading?” The Guide also indicates, “...the myView Writer’s Workshop format is that it includes teacher modeling, responsive feedback, and time for reteaching. This structure encourages constant feedback, reteaching, and improvement.”

Indicator 3l

The purpose/use of each assessment is clear:
0/0

Indicator 3l.i

Assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.

There are several forms of formative, summative, and unit assessments within the materials. The Summative Assessments Guide includes a standards correlation chart for the baseline, middle-of-year, and end-of-year assessments, as well as for all unit tests. The guide provides item analysis information for the teacher, including the item focus/skill, DOK level, and which standard it measures.

  • The Assessment Guide states, “Pearson Realize allows teachers to view each student’s results of assessments taken online, and for assessments aligned to standards, they can see scores by question and by standard. Use the DATA tab of Pearson Realize to view results. Click or tap a bar in the Mastery bar chart to show details of that assessment. Choose the Item Analysis tab to see question level scores. Choose Mastery Analysis tab to see scores by standard.” 
  • In Assessment Guide, Teacher Form, the Weekly Standards Practice details the “slides” to be presented to students that have formative assessments that are used as a measure of vocabulary, phonics, language and conventions. Alignment of standards is presented at bottom of each slide.

Indicator 3l.ii

Assessments provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that assessments provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow up.

The materials provide sufficient guidance for teachers to interpret student performance and plan suggested follow-up activities. Other resources include Assessment Guides, Summative Guides, Professional Development videos, educational articles, and information within the Teacher's Edition. 

Within the Teacher’s Edition are Quick Checks for Assess and Differentiate, which provide data to determine small group instruction, which then includes Strategy Groups, Intervention Activity, On-Level, and Advanced lessons. These occur within every Reading Workshop.

  • The Summative Assessment Guide offers follow up suggestions. For example, “You may wish to use the following guidelines to help determine how best to help improve students’ areas of need and build upon students’ areas of strength. Students who score below 60% on the Baseline Test might benefit from: • regular instruction during whole-class time • intervention activities during small-group time, more scaffolding, more practice with critical skills, and more opportunities to respond • myFocus Readers to practice word-reading skills.”
  • The Assessment Guide provides a section titled “How can I use assessment and data to drive instruction?”, that explains the types of assessments in the materials, including diagnostic, formative, and summative. It further details an overview of the assessments, including Baseline, Cold Reads, Progress Check-ups Unit Tests, Middle of the Year, End of Year, and Project-Based Inquiries.
  • The Assessment Guide includes a section called “What is reporting and how do I use it to inform instruction?”  It presents a table with the data collection tool, what it looks like, and how it works. The Assessment Guide includes information on Data Based Decision Making, which details four stages of data based decision making: Collect Data, Document Data, Evaluate Data, and Instruct from Data.

Indicator 3m

Materials should include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials should include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress.

The Teacher’s Edition provides routines to monitor student progress and are embedded throughout the lessons in each unit. Several formative assessments included within daily routines check for understanding using checklists, conferencing, observation, and rubrics. Progress Check-ups monitor student progress and skills being taught each week, including comprehension, vocabulary, word study, and writing. Cold Reads track student progress each week for comprehension and fluency, and Project-Based Inquiry monitors and tracks student progress through student work centered on the unit theme. A Summative Assessment Guide provides information on interpreting test results, informing instruction, and analyzing results to understand student strengths and weaknesses. The Small Group Guide provides guidance to teachers on how assessment informs instruction, collecting and using information to determine students who need additional skill support, students who have mastered skills being taught, and how to extend the learning for students who are ready to practice and apply skills being taught.

  • “Circulate to discover if students can determine how the elements of a fictional story are similar to and different from the elements of an informational text.”
  • “Quick Check: Notice and Assess: Can students identify the plot and setting in the story to determine the type of fiction? Decide if students struggle, revisit instruction about fiction in small group. If students show understanding, have them continue practicing strategies for reading fiction using the Independent Reading or Literacy Activities in small group.”
  • “Use texts at a student’s independent reading level to practice new strategies. When those strategies become automatic, move on to more challenging and complex texts.”

Indicator 3n

Materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.

Many opportunities exist for students to engage in independent reading, and the teacher materials reflect how to build student stamina, confidence, and motivation throughout their reading experiences. Leveled readers that connect to the genres and themes of each unit are available at each grade level for guided reading and independent reading. During small group independent reading time, students can read from self-selected trade books and independently read from passages and texts previously covered in class for practice. Independent Reading Logs at the beginning of each unit ask students to set a purpose and goal for reading. The log has students provide the date, book, genre, pages read, minutes read, and a rating in order to be accountable for their reading. 

  • The Small Group Guide states that Assignment Logs help students stay organized. “Students’ academic stamina can benefit from having some tasks that are ongoing and not completed in one day. Students may be reading a book to prepare for a Book Club meeting or reading a variety of texts for a unit project.” The Self-Selected Reading and Reflection section notes, “Part of being a member of a community of readers is having self-selected books to read. Include reflection activities to keep students focused and accountable.”
  • The Small Group Guide states, “Having students know that they are accountable for their work when working independently will help them stay on task. Self-monitoring is a skill to be practiced and reinforced. Set up a task checklist that is visible on the work surface where the student is working. Monitor the checklist as you walk around the room. Add a self-monitoring section to the assignment log. Have students rate their focus, work, and accuracy.” 
  • The Small Group Guide contains Habits of Good Readers Routines that teaches strategies for students selecting the right book, and a Focus and Stamina routine that offers students strategies for asking questions while they read. 
  • The Small Group Guide presents strategies for teachers to model building stamina while reading: “This chapter about the states of matter is long! I don’t know much about states of matter. I can feel my brain getting tired of reading. This is a good time to think of the questions I have about this topic. I’ll write them down on sticky notes. As I read on, I’ll see if my questions are answered. I think this will help me stay focused as I read the chapter.”

Criterion 3o - 3r

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards.
10/10
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Criterion Rating Details

myView Literacy provides strategies and tools to support the classroom teacher in meeting the needs of a wide range of learners, including students performing at, above, and below grade level and students for whom English is not their primary language. The materials also provide grouping strategies to support learners in a variety of settings within the classroom.

Indicator 3o

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.

The Teacher’s Edition provides many strategies for meeting the needs of all learners, including English Language Learners, students who may require accommodations/modifications to the lessons and/or learning, as well as a multi-tiered system for students who need re-teaching, review, or enhanced instruction. Each lesson in every unit provides teachers with opportunities to assess and differentiate for the students. Teacher-led options include strategy groups, intervention activities, and quick checks that allow for differentiation where needed to ensure students are meeting the standards. 

  •  In Strategy Groups, “Students practice, with scaffolded support, using their independent level or familiar text. Students might each have a different text to use. The students are 'trying on the strategy' to see if they understand the process or steps.”
  • In On-Level Groups, “You may choose to use text that is at the students’ instructional level. The guided support of the teacher allows for the use of more complex text. All students in the group may use the same text to make sharing the reading easier.”
  • In Intervention Groups, “The goal is to have all students master the grade-level expectations. When working with students who are struggling with a skill, identify the related sub-skills they have mastered and build from there. From time to time, any student in the class may need intervention. While working on the same skills as other students, you may need to adjust the amount of support and scaffolding based on needs.”
  • In Enrichment/Advanced Groups, “Every learner can learn a skill at a deeper, more complex level. For example, the skill of identifying a character’s emotions can be made more complex when reading text that forces the reader to infer the emotions, rather than reading direct statements in the text. Rather than focusing on more advanced skills, help students become masters of the skills using a variety of more complex texts.”

Indicator 3p

Materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade-level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.

Each lesson has components to assess and differentiate learning for students, with suggestions for re-teaching, reviewing, extending, and scaffolding for multi-tiers including ELL students. There are English and Spanish leveled readers. Strategy Groups and ELL guides for scaffolded instruction within the lessons present grade-level content with opportunities for reteaching, review, accommodations, modifications, and additional strategies to check for understanding, while offering targeted support where needed. Each scaffold provides suggestions for emerging/developing/expanding skills. The materials also contain a MyFocus Intervention Guide, which contains scaffolded lessons and “checkpoint assessments” for the skills being taught.

  • “ELL Targeted Support, Visual Support, Read aloud the caption for each image in the infographic. Tell students to listen for the description of each adaptation.”
  • “Quick Check, Notice and Assess, Can students identify key features in an informational text? Decide: If students struggle, revisit instruction about informational text in small group. If students show understanding, have them continue practicing the strategies for reading informational text using the Independent Reading Library and Literacy Activities in small group.” 
  • “Use the ELL Observational Assessment Checklist to monitor student progress for this unit.”
  • “Differentiated Support Option 2, Extend: If students show understanding, have them sort questions into two groups: those they think will be easy to answer and those they think will be more difficult. Ask students to develop a plan for finding answers to the questions in the second category.”

Indicator 3q

Materials regularly include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials regularly include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.

In the Daily Plan, during Small Group Instruction, several options are available: Guided Reading, Strategy Groups, Intervention, On-Level and Advanced Activities, ELL Targeted Support, Conferring, and Fluency. The activities found in this section are geared toward both On-Level and Advanced students, with the bulk of the differentiation accounted for in the use of more complex texts with advanced readers.  

There is a page in the Small Group Guide titled, “What modifications should I make for students who need enrichment of advanced work?”  Extension Activities are available in the Resource Download Center. 

  • In Unit 2, Week 3, Reading Workshop, Assess & Differentiate: Identify Realistic Fiction, On-Level and Advanced, students investigate details in “Perfect Inspiration” to determine if they are realistic. During the week, students also conduct research on the details they chose from the text. Teachers use Extension Activities, pages 82-86, in the Resource Download Center to support students’ work. 
  • In Unit 3, Week 2, Reading Workshop, Assess & Differentiate: Compare Texts, On-Level and Advanced, students collect findings on different ways in which people can reach a goal and organize their findings in an effective format. The teacher talks with students about their findings and the process the students used. Teachers use Extension Activities, pages 126-130, in the Resource Download Center to support students with this task.  
  • In Unit 4, Week 4, Whole Group Instruction, Quick Check, “If students show understanding, extend instruction for making text comparisons in Small Group on pages T266-T267.” 

Indicator 3r

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.

There are a variety of grouping strategies provided in the instructional materials. There are Teacher-Led Options, Independent/Collaborative options, Turn Talk and Share, and Whole Group opportunities. There are times for students to work with a partner and there are Small Group times. During Shared Reading time, students may read independently, in pairs, or as a whole group. 

  • In Unit 1, Introduce the Unit, after introducing the Essential Question, “Encourage partners to discuss what they learned about journeys by watching the video.”  
  • In Unit 2, Week 2, under Introduce the Text, the directions for the teacher state, “Students may read independently, in pairs, or whole group.”  
  • In Unit 4, Week 4, in Whole Group, Formative Assessment Options, “Have students work with a partner to complete the Turn and Talk activity on page 322 of the Student Interactive.”

Criterion 3s - 3v

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. Digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms.
0/0
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Criterion Rating Details

Materials include a web-based platform that is compatible with multiple browsers and devices. The included technology supports student learning, including personalization to support each learner. Materials can be customized for local use. The materials include some opportunities for students and teachers to collaborate electronically through digital platforms, however, the materials lack teacher guidance and support on how to conduct this collaboration or how the collaboration can benefit student performance.

The overall web platform presents several navigational challenges and can be difficult to navigate when searching for resources or program components.

Indicator 3s

Digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), "platform neutral" (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple internet browsers (eg. Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), “platform neutral” (ie., Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.

The materials are accessible from multiple Internet browsers including Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, and Safari. They are equally accessible on a Windows based computer, Chromebook, Android tablet, Android phone, and iPad.

Indicator 3t

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate. 

Students use technology to access the materials, research topics, and publish writing. Students interact regularly with technology through the implementation of the Student Interactive. Teacher guidance is provided that enables the teacher to effectively instruct students in the utilization of technology and its usefulness. 

  • In Unit 3, Week 3, Develop Structure, Use Technology to Interact and Collaborate, students learn how to use technological resources to collaborate on research, including classroom media and digital tools.
  • In Unit 2, Week 6, Conduct Research, detailed instruction is provided for students in how to use a search engine to locate information on computer resources during a research project.
  • In Unit 5, Week 5, Writing Workshop, students publish their original poetry. Methods to publish include posting the poem to a poetry website or blog and submitting the poem to a print or online magazine.

Indicator 3u

Materials can be easily customized for individual learners.
0/0

Indicator 3u.i

Digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations. 

The curriculum provides opportunities for the teacher to individualize the student experience and assignment completion. The curriculum provides the instructions and video explanation for the teacher to follow to comprehend how to modify the experience for the student while integrating Google Classroom. The curriculum does not provide guidance on how to use adaptive technologies for students with either physical or mental disabilities. The ELL support provides the teacher with the opportunity to use online resources to support dual language students.

  • In Getting Started, How-to, Customize myView Literacy, instructions for the teacher are provided on how to personalize the learning, assign tasks, use additional resources or files that are relevant to students.
  • In Getting Started, How-to, Integrating Google Classroom, instructions for the teacher are included on how to integrate the curriculum into the Google Classroom. This tool supports teachers’ and students’ use of the program’s technology both in and out of the classroom.
  • The Digital Walkthrough for Realize Reader (Online Student Edition) was not available. 
  • All Unit Tests have the ability to be modified or edited based on the needs of the students. There is a link for the teacher to customize each Unit Test.
  • On-level Cold Reads for Fluency and Comprehension (Online), Resources, the teacher has the option to customize this task based on the needs of the student(s).

Indicator 3u.ii

Materials can be easily customized for local use.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria the criteria that materials can be easily customized for local use.

The curriculum provides the teacher with the opportunity to customize tasks, assessments (formative and summative), and add additional materials to best support the students within the classroom. The ability to use the materials online allows the teacher the opportunity to integrate the materials into Google Classroom. 

Under the Create Content tab, teachers have the ability to upload files, add links, and build tests. They also have the option to add items of their choosing to the My Content tab. The Rearrange tab allows teachers to rearrange the order of the table of contents within the materials. There is also a State Customization tab under the Teacher Resources tab, which contains a state-specific lesson plan template.

Indicator 3v

Materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.).
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the criteria that materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.)

The materials include some opportunities for students and teachers to collaborate electronically through digital platforms when conducting research; however, the materials lack teacher guidance and support on how to conduct this collaboration or how the collaboration can benefit student accomplishments.

The article, “Purposeful Uses of Technology for Literacy and Learning Through Inquiry in Grades K–5” by Julie Coiro, Ph.D. provides the teacher with a research-based article that lists the websites and other forms of technology a teacher can use to enhance literacy practices in the classroom.

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Additional Publication Details

Report Published Date: 04/14/2020

Report Edition: 2020

Title ISBN Edition Publisher Year
myView Literacy Digital Courseware Pilot 1-Year License Grade 5 978-0-134973-98-2 Pearson 2020

About Publishers Responses

All publishers are invited to provide an orientation to the educator-led team that will be reviewing their materials. The review teams also can ask publishers clarifying questions about their programs throughout the review process.

Once a review is complete, publishers have the opportunity to post a 1,500-word response to the educator report and a 1,500-word document that includes any background information or research on the instructional materials.

About Technology Information

EdReports requested that publishers fill out The Instructional Materials Technology Information document about each of their products that met our alignment criteria. This document does not evaluate the quality or desirability of any product functionality, but documents features in order to empower local schools and districts with information to select materials that will work best for them given their technological capabilities and instructional vision.

Please note: Beginning in spring 2020, reports developed by EdReports.org will be using an updated version of our review tools. View draft versions of our revised review criteria here.

Educator-Led Review Teams

Each report found on EdReports.org represents hundreds of hours of work by educator reviewers. Working in teams of 4-5, reviewers use educator-developed review tools, evidence guides, and key documents to thoroughly examine their sets of materials.

After receiving over 25 hours of training on the EdReports.org review tool and process, teams meet weekly over the course of several months to share evidence, come to consensus on scoring, and write the evidence that ultimately is shared on the website.

All team members look at every grade and indicator, ensuring that the entire team considers the program in full. The team lead and calibrator also meet in cross-team PLCs to ensure that the tool is being applied consistently among review teams. Final reports are the result of multiple educators analyzing every page, calibrating all findings, and reaching a unified conclusion.

Rubric Design

The EdReports.org’s rubric supports a sequential review process through three gateways. These gateways reflect the importance of standards alignment to the fundamental design elements of the materials and considers other attributes of high-quality curriculum as recommended by educators.

Advancing Through Gateways

  • Materials must meet or partially meet expectations for the first set of indicators to move along the process. Gateways 1 and 2 focus on questions of alignment. Are the instructional materials aligned to the standards? Are all standards present and treated with appropriate depth and quality required to support student learning?
  • Gateway 3 focuses on the question of usability. Are the instructional materials user-friendly for students and educators? Materials must be well designed to facilitate student learning and enhance a teacher’s ability to differentiate and build knowledge within the classroom. In order to be reviewed and attain a rating for usability (Gateway 3), the instructional materials must first meet expectations for alignment (Gateways 1 and 2).

Key Terms Used throughout Review Rubric and Reports

  • Indicator Specific item that reviewers look for in materials.
  • Criterion Combination of all of the individual indicators for a single focus area.
  • Gateway Organizing feature of the evaluation rubric that combines criteria and prioritizes order for sequential review.
  • Alignment Rating Degree to which materials meet expectations for alignment, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.
  • Usability Degree to which materials are consistent with effective practices for use and design, teacher planning and learning, assessment, and differentiated instruction.

ELA 3-8 Rubric and Evidence Guides

The ELA review rubrics identify the criteria and indicators for high quality instructional materials. The rubrics support a sequential review process that reflect the importance of alignment to the standards then consider other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

For ELA, our rubrics evaluate materials based on:

  • Text Quality and Complexity, and Alignment to Standards with Tasks Grounded in Evidence

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

  • Instructional Supports and Usability

The ELA Evidence Guides complement the rubrics by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

The EdReports rubric supports a sequential review process through three gateways. These gateways reflect the importance of alignment to college and career ready standards and considers other attributes of high-quality curriculum, such as usability and design, as recommended by educators.

Materials must meet or partially meet expectations for the first set of indicators (gateway 1) to move to the other gateways. 

Gateways 1 and 2 focus on questions of alignment to the standards. Are the instructional materials aligned to the standards? Are all standards present and treated with appropriate depth and quality required to support student learning?

Gateway 3 focuses on the question of usability. Are the instructional materials user-friendly for students and educators? Materials must be well designed to facilitate student learning and enhance a teacher’s ability to differentiate and build knowledge within the classroom. 

In order to be reviewed and attain a rating for usability (Gateway 3), the instructional materials must first meet expectations for alignment (Gateways 1 and 2).

Alignment and usability ratings are assigned based on how materials score on a series of criteria and indicators with reviewers providing supporting evidence to determine and substantiate each point awarded.

For ELA and math, alignment ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for alignment to college- and career-ready standards, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.

For science, alignment ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for alignment to the Next Generation Science Standards, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.

For all content areas, usability ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for effective practices (as outlined in the evaluation tool) for use and design, teacher planning and learning, assessment, differentiated instruction, and effective technology use.

Math K-8

Math High School

ELA K-2

ELA 3-5

ELA 6-8


ELA High School

Science Middle School

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