Alignment: Overall Summary

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The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 5 meet expectations for Alignment to the CCSSM. The materials meet the expectations for Focus and Coherence by assessing grade-level content, spending the large majority of instructional time on major work of the grade, and they are coherent with the progressions of the standards, making meaningful connections between supporting and major work of the grade, are viable for a school year, and present all students with opportunities to engage in extensive work with grade level problems to meet the full intent of grade level standards. The materials meet the expectations for Rigor and Mathematical Practices as they meet the expectations for Rigor and Balance and meet the expectations for Practice-Content Connections. The materials balance the rigorous expectations of the Standards, and they attend to Practice-Content Connections, addressing all of the Mathematical Practice Standards; however, there are instances where these are over-identified. 

See Rating Scale Understanding Gateways

Alignment

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Meets Expectations

Gateway 1:

Focus & Coherence

0
7
12
14
14
12-14
Meets Expectations
8-11
Partially Meets Expectations
0-7
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Rigor & Mathematical Practices

0
10
16
18
17
16-18
Meets Expectations
11-15
Partially Meets Expectations
0-10
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

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Meets Expectations

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
22
31
38
38
31-38
Meets Expectations
23-30
Partially Meets Expectations
0-22
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Focus & Coherence

Meets Expectations

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Gateway One Details

The instructional materials for Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 5 meet expectations for focusing on the major work of the grade and are coherent with the Standards. The materials do not assess topics before the grade-level, spend at least 65% of class time on the major clusters of the grade, and are coherent and consistent with the Standards.

Criterion 1a

Materials do not assess topics before the grade level in which the topic should be introduced.
2/2
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 5 meet expectations for not assessing topics before the grade level in which the topic should be introduced. Overall, the materials assess grade-level content and, if applicable, content from earlier grades.

Indicator 1a

The instructional material assesses the grade-level content and, if applicable, content from earlier grades. Content from future grades may be introduced but students should not be held accountable on assessments for future expectations.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 5 meet expectations that they assess grade-level content.

In i-Ready, Teach and Assess, Ready Classroom Mathematics, there are two versions of Unit Assessments: Form A and Form B for each unit. Form A assessments are editable. Form A assessments include a standards correlation chart, DOK levels, as well as a correlation to the lesson/s related to each assessment item. Form B assessments do not include this feature. In addition, in i-Ready, Teach and Assess, Assessments, Comprehension Checks are also available and can be used as an alternative to print mid- and end-unit assessments. Probability, statistical distributions, similarities, transformations, and congruence do not appear in the assessments. 

Examples of assessment items from the Classroom Resources aligned to grade-level standards include:

  • In Unit 3, End of Unit, Mid-Unit Assessment, Form B, Item 5 states, “Which of the following situations can be represented by 7/5? Choose all the correct answers.”  The answer choices are:
    • A. Matt makes 5 equal servings of granola from a bag that holds 7 ounces.
    • B. Hannah buys 7 packs of microscope slides with 5 slides in a pack.
    • C. Dominic has 7 meters of rope that he will cut into 5 pieces of equal length.
    • D. Katie hangs 5 oil paintings and 7 watercolor paintings
    • F. Spencer opens 5 packs of beef jerky and shares them equally with 7 friends. (5.NF.3)
  • In Unit 4, Assess, Mid-Unit Assessment, Form B, Item 5 states, “How many centimeters in 27 meters?” There are four options are: 2,700 centimeters, 270 centimeters, 2.7 centimeters, 0.27 centimeters. (5.MD.A.1) 
  • In Unit 2, Assess, End of Unit Assessment, Form A, Item 5 states, “Jake buys $$1\frac {1}{2}$$ yards of cloth. He uses $$\frac {2}{3}$$ yard for a craft project. How much cloth, in yards, does Jake have left? Show your work.” (5.NF.A.2)

Examples of assessment items from the Assess and Teach aligned to Grade 5 CCSS include:

  • In Comprehension Check, Comprehension Checks Details, Unit 4, Item 9 states, “The list below shows some attributes of shapes: at least 3 angles, at least 1 pair of parallel sides, at least 2 sides of equal length. Which shapes always have all the attributes in the list? Choose all the correct answers: square, rhombus, trapezoid, quadrilateral, equilateral triangle” (5.G.4)
  • In Comprehension Check, Comprehension Checks Details, Unit 5, Item 1 states, “Use the coordinate plane,” and then displays a first quadrant graph with four plotted points labeled, M, P, N and L. The item further states, “Match each point with its ordered pair. Drag an ordered pair into each box. Not all answers will be used.” The bottom of the item displays six coordinate points with drag and drop capability for the student to fill the four empty boxes. (5.G.A.1)
  • In Comprehension Check, Comprehension Checks Details, Unit 2 (Lessons 10-14), Item 2 states, “A gardener measured the height of three trees as 264.4 centimeters, 264.18 centimeters, and 279.7 centimeters.  What is the difference in height between the tallest and shortest trees? Enter your answer in the box. The difference between the tallest tree and shortest tree is ____ centimeters.” (5.NBT.7)

Criterion 1b

Students and teachers using the materials as designed devote the large majority of class time in each grade K-8 to the major work of the grade.
4/4
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials for Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 5 meet the expectations for students and teachers using the materials as designed and devoting the majority of class time to the major work of the grade. Overall, instructional materials spend at least 65% of class time on the major clusters of the grade.

Indicator 1b

Instructional material spends the majority of class time on the major cluster of each grade.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 5 meet expectations for spending a majority of instructional time on major work of the grade. 

  • The approximate number of units devoted to major work of the grade (including assessments and supporting work connected to the major work) is 3.5 out of 5, which is approximately 70%.
  • The number of lessons devoted to major work of the grade (including assessments and supporting work connected to the major work) is 32.5 out of 38, which is approximately 80%.
  • The number of days devoted to major work (including assessments and supporting work connected to the major work) is 119 out of 145, which is approximately 82%. 

An instructional day level analysis is most representative of the materials because the number of sessions within each topic and lesson can vary and each lesson includes specific objectives aligned to standards. When reviewing the number of instructional days for Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 5 materials, approximately 82% of the days are focused on the major work of the grade.

Criterion 1c - 1f

Coherence: Each grade's instructional materials are coherent and consistent with the Standards.
8/8
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 5 meet the expectations for being coherent and consistent with the Standards. Overall, the instructional materials connect supporting content to enhance focus and coherence, are consistent with the progressions of the standards, foster connections at a single grade, where appropriate, and include extensive work with grade level problems to meet the full intent of grade-level standards.

Indicator 1c

Supporting content enhances focus and coherence simultaneously by engaging students in the major work of the grade.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 5 meet expectations that supporting work enhances focus and coherence simultaneously by engaging students in the major work of the grade.

Throughout the materials, supporting standards/clusters are connected to the major standards/clusters of the grade. The following are examples of the connections between supporting work and major work in the Classroom Resources:

  • In Lesson 8, Session 5, supporting standard 5.OA.A.1 is connected to major work standard 5.NBT.3, as students simplify an expression with parentheses to find if the expression is equivalent to a number with a decimal. Students demonstrate their understanding of place value while also writing and interpreting numerical expressions.  
  • In Lesson 26, Sessions 1-4,  supporting standard 5.MD.1 connects to major cluster 5.NBT.B, as students solve problems converting measurement units. In Session 3, Develop, Apply It, problem 6, “A tree in Kenji’s backyard is 6.7 meters tall. A tree in Cho’s backyard is 730 centimeters tall. Which tree is taller? Show your work.”
  • In Lesson 27, Session 3,  connects supporting cluster 5.MD.B (Represent and interpret data) to major work standard 5.NF.2 (addition and subtraction of fractions with unlike denominators), as students solve word problems based on data presented in a line plot with fractional values. Students answer, “What is the difference between the weights of the lightest and heaviest shells Renaldo collected?”

Indicator 1d

The amount of content designated for one grade level is viable for one school year in order to foster coherence between grades.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 5 meet expectations that the amount of content designated for one grade level is viable for one year.

As designed, the instructional materials can be completed in 156 days consisting of: 

  • There are 121 days of lessons.  
  • There are 9 days for unit assessments, 6 days for i-Ready diagnostic assessments and 5 days for review, for a total of 20 days. 
  • There are 10 days for Math in Action activities. 
  • There are 5 days dedicated to lesson 0 at the beginning of the school year to set up instructional routines with students that will be used throughout the year.

According to Ready Classroom Mathematics Implementation, sessions are designed to be 45-60 minutes in length. Pacing information from the publisher regarding viability for one school year can be found in the document titled “Yearly Pacing” found in the “Program Implementation” tab on the home page for each grade level. The “Yearly Pacing” includes a list of units, lessons within each unit, and the number of days each lesson encompasses, a note that lessons are 45-60 minutes in length and number of days for assessments. Pacing information is also verified in the “Classroom Resources” tab in each unit for each lesson in the “Lesson Overview and Family Connection” that includes a “Lesson Pacing Guide” with more detailed information that lists sessions and minutes for each lesson.

Indicator 1e

Materials are consistent with the progressions in the Standards i. Materials develop according to the grade-by-grade progressions in the Standards. If there is content from prior or future grades, that content is clearly identified and related to grade-level work ii. Materials give all students extensive work with grade-level problems iii. Materials relate grade level concepts explicitly to prior knowledge from earlier grades.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 5 meet expectations for the materials being consistent with the progressions in the Standards. Content from prior grades is identified and connected to grade-level work, and students are given extensive work with grade-level problems. ​​

Overall, the materials develop according to the grade-by-grade progressions in the standards and prior year content is identified as prerequisite skills at the lesson level. In the Unit Overview, the materials include a Learning Progression which clearly identifies the lessons from prior years that contain skill students would connect to the current unit of instruction. For example, in Unit 4, Measurement, Data, and Geometry, the Learning Progression identifies “Grade 3, Lesson 26, Measure Length and Plot Date on Line Plots; Grade 4, Lesson 22, Add and Subtract Fraction in Line Plots as prior learning for Lesson Grade 5, Lesson 27, Make Line Plots and Interpret Data. In turn Lesson 27 leads to future learning in Grade, Lesson 27, Measures of Center and Variability, and Lesson 28, Display Date on Dot Plots, Histograms and Box Plots.”

The materials give all students extensive work with grade-level problems. Units consist of lessons, which are designed to last between three and five days. Within each lesson, days are broken into Explore, Develop, and Refine sessions. Develop and Refine sessions have ample practice problems for students to understand and apply concepts, and Develop sessions also include Fluency and Skills Practice pages. Each unit also includes a Math in Action lesson, which provides further work with grade-level problems over 2 days. In addition, each lesson includes math center activities and enrichment activities, which both provide more work with grade level concepts. For example:

  • Lesson 12, Add Fractions, focuses on 5.NF.A (Use equivalent fractions as a strategy to add and subtract fractions). In Session 1, Explore, students work on adding and subtracting fractions with unlike denominators. “Emiliano needs 1/2 of a stick of butter to make cornbread. He also needs 1/4 stick of butter to make apple muffins. What fraction of a stick of butter does he need in all?” In Session 2, Develop, students explore strategies for adding fractions with unlike denominators, which is extended to adding with mixed numbers in Session 3. In Session 4, Refine, students use multiple strategies for adding mixed numbers and fractions with unlike denominators.
  • In Lesson 19, Session 2,  students focus on multiplication with unit fractions to solve problems such as 2/5 x 1/2 = ? and 3/4 x 1/3 =? with the assistance of a number line and visual model.  
  • Lessons 22, 23, and 24 focus on 5.NF.7 (Apply and extend previous understandings of division to divide unit fractions by whole numbers and whole numbers by unit fractions). Students apply their knowledge of multiplication to divide unit fractions and solve word problems involving division of unit fractions. In Lesson 23, Session 1, Explore, students solve, “Mrs. Cook wants to share 1/4 pound of fish equally among 3 cats. How much fish will each cat get?Students are prompted to “Draw on the area model to solve the problemand “Complete the division equation to match your model: 1/4 ÷ 3 =__. 
  • Lessons 10 and 11 focus on 5.NBT.7 (Add, subtract, multiply and divide decimals to hundredths, using concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place bale, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction; relate the strategy to a written method and explain the reasoning used). In Unit 2, Math in Action, students use decimals and fractions to look at and consider alternative solutions for a problem that provides the unit cost for dog collars of different sizes. The materials state, “Find how much Bella makes on each collar after paying for supplies. Show a way to make at least $225 by selling collars. Include at least 5 collars of each size in your plan.”  
  • Lessons 25 and 26 focus 5.MD.1. Students apply their understanding of fraction and decimal equivalence to convert measurement units and solve word problems involving conversions of measurement units. 

The instructional materials explicitly connect prior learning to grade level content. In the Lesson Overview, the Learning Progression identifies the mathematics taught in earlier grades or earlier in the grade, and connects it with the mathematics in the lesson. In Small Group Differentiation, Prepare, there is a link to Prerequisite Lessons. The Family Letter can also contain information on the learning progressions for students. For example,

  • In Lesson 12, Lesson Overview, Differentiated Instruction, Prepare, Ready Prerequisite Lessons include Grade 4, Lesson 17, Understand Equivalent Fractions; Lesson 20, Add and Subtract Fractions; and Lesson 21, Add and Subtract Mixed Numbers.
  • In Lesson 29, Lesson Overview, the Learning Progression states, “In Grade 4, students classified two-dimensional figures based on their attributes, such as having parallel or perpendicular sides and having right, acute, or obtuse angles. In the previous Grade 5 lesson (Lesson 28) students described how attributes belonging to a larger category belong to subcategories of that category and they used simple Venn diagrams and tree diagrams to show category/subcategory relationships. In this lesson, students use their understanding of shape properties, categories, and subcategories to classify shapes into Venn and tree diagrams, including Venn diagrams that have regions that overlap.”
  • In Lesson 21, Lesson Overview, Prerequisite Skills are identified as, “Multiply whole numbers.”

Indicator 1f

Materials foster coherence through connections at a single grade, where appropriate and required by the Standards i. Materials include learning objectives that are visibly shaped by CCSSM cluster headings. ii. Materials include problems and activities that serve to connect two or more clusters in a domain, or two or more domains in a grade, in cases where these connections are natural and important.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 5 meet expectations that materials foster coherence through connections at a single grade, where appropriate and required by the Standards. Overall, the materials include lesson objectives that are visibly shaped by CCSSM cluster headings. 

The instructional materials identify a Learning Objectives in each Lesson Overview, and in the Student Workbook, Learning Targets are provided for students. Examples of lesson objectives that are visibly shaped by CCSSM cluster headings in Classroom Resources include:

  • In Student Workbook, Lesson 6, Sessions 1-3, the Learning Target states, “Recognize that in a multi-digit number, a digit in one place represents 10 times as much as it represents in the place to its right and 1/10 of what it represents in the place to its left.” This learning target aligns with 5.NBT.A (understand the place value system).
  • In Student Workbook, Lesson 22, the Learning Target states, “Solve real-world problems involving multiplication of fractions and mixed numbers, e.g., by using visual fraction models or equations to represent the problem.” This Learning Target aligns to 5.NF.B (apply and extend previous understandings of multiplication and division to multiply and divide fractions).
  • In Lesson 31, Lesson Overview, the Learning Objective includes “Recognize the coordinate plane as a two-dimensional space determined by the intersection of a horizontal and a vertical number line.” 

There are many instances of problems and activities within the materials that serve to connect two or more clusters in a domain or two or more domains in a grade. For example, in Classroom Resources: 

  • In Lesson 33, Session 3 connects 5.OA.B (Analyze patterns and relationships) and 5.G.A (Graph points on the coordinate plane to solve real-world and mathematical problems), as students graph points on a coordinate grid and then analyze the patterns of the graph plots. Problem 8 presents two patterns to which students write ordered pairs made of corresponding terms in the patterns, and then plot the points on a coordinate grid.
  • In Unit 5, Math in Action connects 5.MD (Measurement and Date) and 5.G (Geometry) as students solve area and perimeter problems involving shapes with specific properties on the coordinate grid. 
  • Lesson 16 connects 5.NBT.A (Understand the place value system) and 5.NBT.B (Perform operations with multi-digit whole numbers and with decimals to hundredths), as students use place value reasoning with expanded form and the commutative property to multiply decimals.  Problem 9 states, “A small rectangular painting is 0.6 foot long and 0.57 foot wide. How many square feet is the painting? Show your work using equations.”

There was one instance where a correlation was noted and not present in the materials. In Classroom Resources, Unit 1, Lesson 4, the Correlations Document states that 5.NBT.B (perform operations with multi-digit whole numbers with decimals to the hundredths) and 5.MD.C (exploring concepts of volume) are connected within the materials. While this lesson presents many examples of multi-digit multiplication and finding area, no examples of finding volume with multi-digit multiplication were present.

Gateway Two

Rigor & Mathematical Practices

Meets Expectations

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Gateway Two Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 5 meet the expectations for alignment with the Standards’ expectations for rigor and the mathematical practices. The instructional materials attend to each of the three aspects of rigor individually, and also attend to balance among the three aspects. The instructional emphasizes mathematical reasoning, and attends to the full intent of each practice standard; however, there are instances where the practice standards are overidentified.

Criterion 2a - 2d

Rigor and Balance: Each grade's instructional materials reflect the balances in the Standards and help students meet the Standards' rigorous expectations, by helping students develop conceptual understanding, procedural skill and fluency, and application.
8/8
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 5 meet the expectations for reflecting the balances in the Standards, and helping students to meet the Standards’ rigorous expectations by helping students develop and demonstrate conceptual understanding, procedural skill and fluency, and application. The instructional materials develop conceptual understanding of key mathematical concepts, give attention throughout the year to procedural skill and fluency, spend sufficient time working with engaging applications, and do not always treat the three aspects of rigor together or separately.

Indicator 2a

Attention to conceptual understanding: Materials develop conceptual understanding of key mathematical concepts, especially where called for in specific content standards or cluster headings.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 5 meet expectations that the materials develop conceptual understanding of key mathematical concepts, especially where called for in specific standards or cluster headings. 

Lessons are designed to support students to explore and develop conceptual understanding of grade-level mathematics. For example, students develop conceptual understanding:

  • In Lesson 6, Session 1, Explore, Problem 1 states, “Look at the place value models for whole numbers. Write the missing factor in each equation to show how ones, tens, hundreds, and thousands are related.” Equations include, “1,000 = __x100, 100 = __ x10, and 10= __ x 1.”  Students use pictures of place value blocks and decimal grids to show how place values are related. (5.NBT.1) 
  • In Lesson 18, Session 2, Develop, Try It states, “Jared, Monica, and Heather have 5 hallways to decorate for the student council. If they share the work equally how much will each student decorate.” Students use pictures or number lines to solve problems involving fractions or mixed numbers. (5.NF.3)  
  • In Lesson 22, Session 1, Explore, Try It states, “Grayson lives $$\frac {4}{5}$$ mile from the park. He already walked $$\frac {3}{4}$$ of the way to the park. How far has Grayson walked? Use a visual fraction model to show your thinking.” Students have access to a math toolkit which lists, “fraction tiles or circles, fraction bars, fraction models, grid paper, number lines, index cards and multiplication models.” (5.NF.B.6)

In the Student Worktext and during Interactive Practice, students have opportunities to independently demonstrate conceptual understanding. For example:

  • In Lesson 7, Session 2, Develop, Practice with Powers of 10, Problem 6 states, “Describe how the placement of the decimal point changes when you multiply a number by a power of ten. How is this the same or different for division?” (5.NBT.2)
  • In Lesson 20, Session 3, Practice Tilling a Rectangle to Find Area, Problem 4 states, “Danah has a rectangular strawberry patch in her garden. Its border is $$\frac {7}{8}$$ yard wide and $$\frac {3}{2}$$ yards long. Use a visual model to find the area of Danah’s strawberry patch. Then write an equation to describe your model. Show your work.” (5.NF.4)
  • In Lesson 31, Student Worktext, Session 2, Develop, Practice with the Coordinate Plane, Problems 5, 6, and 7, students use a table and the coordinate plane to help them understand how to plot points. 
  • In Interactive Practice, Find Volume Using Unit Cubes, students use unit cubes to find the volume, first finding the number of cubes in a layer and then the number of layers to find the volume. (5.MD.4)
  • In Interactive Practice, Divide Decimals, students reason about place value and decimals before dividing based on what they know about multiplication and division of single digit numbers. (5.NBT.7)

Indicator 2b

Attention to Procedural Skill and Fluency: Materials give attention throughout the year to individual standards that set an expectation of procedural skill and fluency.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 5 meets expectations that they attend to those standards that set an expectation of procedural skill and fluency. 

The instructional materials include problems and questions, interactive games, and math center activities that develop procedural skill and fluency throughout the grade. Students have opportunities to develop procedural skills and fluency for Cluster 5.NBT.B (Perform operations with multi-digit whole numbers and with decimals to hundredths). For example, in Classroom Resources:

  • In Lesson 15, Session 3, Refine, Apply It, Problem 3 states, “What is the product of 2 and 0.73?” “Kendall chose (B) as the correct answer. How did she get that answer?” Students need to analyze the solution and identify the error in a procedural problem. (5.NBT.7)
  • The materials include an online game platform with interactive games for students to build procedural skills and fluency. For example, Grade 5 students can play the game “Match” which allows them to strengthen skills in the area of computation (5.NBT.5, 5.NBT.6). In this game, students are tasked with solving addition, subtraction, multiplication, or division problems and finding a card that has a matching solution. 

5.NBT.5 (Fluently multiply multi digit whole numbers using the standard algorithm) requires students to develop grade level fluency. This standard is addressed in several lessons, including:

  • In Student Worktext, Lesson 4, Session 4, Refine, Apply It, students use the standard algorithm for multiplication to solve problems. Problem 3 states, “A certain washing machine uses 29 gallons of water for each load of laundry washed. How many gallons of water would the washing machine use for 156 loads of laundry? Show your work.” 
  • In Unit 1, Math in Action, Session 2, Persevere On Your Own states, “Beau plans to bring his recycled robots to the fair. Guests can buy tickets to play with the robots. Beau needs to rope off an area of the fairgrounds to keep his robots in sight. Read his notes. Robot Area Notes: The area should be rectangular. It needs to be more than 100 feet long and less than 100 feet wide. The area needs to be between 7,500 and 10,000 square feet.” Solve It states, “Describe an area that Beau can rope off his robots.”

The instructional materials provide opportunities to independently demonstrate procedural skill and fluency throughout the grade level. Within each lesson, there are Fluency and Skills Practice pages that children complete on their own. In addition, there are Learning Games and Math Center Activities that engage students with fluency practice. Examples of when students get opportunities to independently demonstrate procedural skill and fluency are:

  • In Lesson 3, Session 4, Refine, Problem 2 states, “The rectangular prism shown below has a volume of 42 cubic meters. What is the length of the prism? Show your work.” The height and width are given. 
  • In Lesson 10, Fluency and Skill Practice, Problem 3 states, “2.31 + 2.075.” 
  • In Lesson 26, Fluency and Skill Practice, Problem 4 states, “Kareem has a pencil that is 13.5 centimeters long and a crayon that is 87.5 millimeters long. How many millimeters longer is the pencil than the crayon? (1 centimeter = 10 millimeters).”
  • Math Center Activities are provided for students to work together in partnerships to develop procedural skill and fluency. In Lesson 4, Equivalent Multiplication Expressions, students take turns determining if the multiplication expression given in the header of the table are equivalent to the expressions listed in the table.

Indicator 2c

Attention to Applications: Materials are designed so that teachers and students spend sufficient time working with engaging applications of the mathematics, without losing focus on the major work of each grade
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 5 meet expectations that the materials are designed so that teachers and students spend sufficient time working with engaging applications of mathematics. Engaging applications include single and multi-step problems, routine and non-routine, presented in a context in which the mathematics is applied. 

Examples of opportunities for students to engage in routine and non-routine application of mathematical skills independently and to demonstrate the use of mathematics flexibly in a variety of contexts in Classroom Routines include: 

  • In Unit 2, End of Unit Assessment, Problem 5 states, “Janet buys $$1\frac{1}{4}$$ yards of cloth. She uses $$\frac{3}{8}$$ yard for a craft project. How much cloth, in yards, does Janet have left? Show your work."
  • In Lesson 22, Session 2, Develop, Try It states, “Brandon’s mother left $$\frac{3}{4}$$ of a pizza on the counter. If Brandon eats $$\frac{2}{3}$$ of the leftover pizza, how much of the whole pizza did Brandon eat?” 
  • In Unit 3, Math Center Activity, Real-World Multiplication Situations, students are given four word problems where fractions and mixed numbers are required to be multiplied in order to find the solution. Specifically, “Robert bought a box of 36 pencils. He placed $$\frac{1}{9}$$ of them in his desk drawer. He placed $$\frac{3}{4}$$ of the pencils left in the box in a storage cabinet. He gave the rest of the pencils to his sister. How many pencils did he give to his sister?”
  • In Lesson 26, Fluency and Practice states, “Cassie has $$10\frac{1}{2}$$ feet of string to make 15 beaded bracelets. She needs 9 inches of string for each bracelet. Does she have enough string to make all the bracelets? Explain (1 ft = 12 inches).”

The instructional materials include multiple opportunities for students to engage in non- routine application of mathematical skills and knowledge of the grade level. 

For example, in Classroom Resources:

  • In Unit 2, End of Unit, Unit Review, Performance Task states, “You have a movie theater gift card worth $40, so you invite a friend to go to the movies with you. Your friend challenges you to spend the exact value of the gift card. Find at least one way to do so by choosing from the items listed below.” A table is provided listing things for purchase and their prices.
  • In Unit 3, Math in Action, Session 2, Solve It states, “A local nursery hears about the shrub planting project that G.O. and his neighbors are planning. The nursery gives them 50 pounds of compost to use. G.O. reads about using compost on a website. ‘When you plant a shrub, it can help to mix the soil with some compost. You can use a scoop of compost for each shrub. An average scoop of compost is between $$\frac{1}{4}$$ and $$\frac{1}{2}$$ pound.’ About how many shrubs can G.O. plant with the compost that the nursery gave him?”
  • In Unit 4, Math in Action, Session 2, Preserve on Your Own states, “Sweet T is planning a BBQ for 50 people. There will be 2 different kinds of protein and 3 side dishes on the menu. Here are his choices, including amounts to estimate per person. Protein: Choose from ground beef, chicken, steak, or salmon. Estimate 6 to 8 ounces per person. Sides: Baked Beans, 2-3 ounces per person; Coleslaw, 3-4 ounces per person; Potato Salad, 4-5 ounces per person; Grilled vegetables: 3-4 ounces per person; Rice: 1:2 ounces per person. What food and how much of each should Sweet T make?”

Indicator 2d

Balance: The three aspects of rigor are not always treated together and are not always treated separately. There is a balance of the 3 aspects of rigor within the grade.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 5 meet expectations that the three aspects of rigor are not always treated together and are not always treated separately. The instructional materials address specific aspects of rigor, and the materials integrate aspects of rigor.

All three aspects of rigor are present independently throughout the program materials. For example:

  • In Lesson 15, Session 2, Develop, students develop conceptual understanding for multiplying decimals. Try It states, “Padma bought 3 pounds of grapes.  Each pound of grapes costs $2.75. How much money did Padma spend on grapes?”  
  • In Lesson 4, Fluency and Skills Practice, students use procedural skill and fluency when multiplying multi-digit whole numbers using the standard algorithm. There are 15 multi-digit whole number multiplication problems, including, “580 x 30;” “1,236 x 55;” and “2,409 x 23.” 
  • In Lesson 22, Session 4, Develop engages students in application. Problem 7 states, “Lily paints 3 trees for a wall mural. The middle tree is $$2\frac{1}{2}$$ ft tall. The tree on the left is ¾ as tall as the middle tree. The tree on the right is $$1\frac{3}{4}$$ times as tall as the middle tree. How tall is each tree? Show your work.” 

Multiple aspects of rigor are engaged simultaneously to develop students’ mathematical understanding of a single topic/unit of study throughout the materials. For example:

  • In the game platform students are given the opportunity to practice skills that simultaneously work on conceptual understanding and build fluency. For example, the game “Bounce” focuses on placing decimals on a number line. Students use a number line to move a ball to its correct location based on the given decimal. 
  • In Lesson 14, Session 2, Develop combines conceptual understanding, procedural skill, and application.  Students solve word problems involving addition and subtraction of fractions, mixed numbers, and decimals. Apply It, Problem 7 states, “Tim’s bean sprout grew $$3\frac{3}{8}$$ inches. Teegan’s bean sprout grew $$2\frac{3}{4}$$ inches. How many more inches did Tim’s bean sprout grow than Teegan’s? Estimate to tell if your solution is reasonable. Show your work.”

Criterion 2e - 2g.iii

Practice-Content Connections: Materials meaningfully connect the Standards for Mathematical Content and the Standards for Mathematical Practice
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 5 meet expectations for Practice-Content connections. Overall, the materials attend to the full meaning of the mathematical practices; however, there are instances where the practice standards are over-identified.

Indicator 2e

The Standards for Mathematical Practice are identified and used to enrich mathematics content within and throughout each applicable grade.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 5 partially meet expectations that the Standards for Mathematical Practice are identified and used to enrich mathematics content within and throughout the grade level.

In i-Ready, Teach and Assess, Ready Classroom Mathematics, Program Implementation, Standards for Mathematics in Every Lesson, The Standards for Mathematical Practice (MPs) are identified in each lesson along with information for how these MPs are addressed within the lessons.  Specific information for an MP can be found in “Deepen Understanding” guidance for teachers. In addition, Discourse Questions, Structure and Reasoning, specifically related to MP7 (Look for and make use of structure) and MP8 (Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning) and the use Try-Discuss-Connect Instructional Routines all identify the MPs. In the document “Standards for Mathematical Practice in Every Lesson,” each lesson routine is outlined with the specific MPs that are addressed. Specifically, Try It focuses on MPs 1, 2, 4, 5, and 6, Discuss It focuses on MPs 2, 3, and 6, and Connect It focuses on MPs 2,4, and 5. These routines are present in each lesson.  

A “Correlations” document is also available in Program Implementation which includes “Standards for Mathematical Practices (SMPs) Correlation.” This table lists all eight Mathematical Practices, their corresponding descriptors, and the lessons where they can be found. A second table “Correlations by Ready Classroom Mathematics Lesson” provides a lesson by lesson listing of the MPs. In both tables, MPs 1 - 6 are identified as being present in all lessons, leading to an overidentification of these MPs. MP7 and MP8 are identified in specific lessons. 

While these resources indicate a connection to the Standards for Mathematical Practice, the materials do not include a clear connection at the lesson and item level, in the teacher’s guide or student materials, as to how students are being explicitly taught and/or exposed to these standards. For example, in Lesson 7 the MPs 6, 7, and 8 are listed as being an area of focus in the lesson. Teachers are referred back to Program Implementation, Standards for Mathematical Practice in Every Lesson, but there is no identification within lesson components for these MPs.

The Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 5 instructional materials are structured so that the MPs enrich the content and are not treated as separate topics and/or activities. For example:

  • In Lesson 2, Session 1, students choose tools strategically (MP5) to solve, “Carl filled the clear box shown below with unit cubes to find its volume. The unit cubes Carl used all have side lengths of 1 foot. What is the volume of the box?” A box made up of three columns and two rows of unit blocks is shown.
  • In Lesson 20, Session 3, students use structure to explain how to multiply mixed numbers, and use generalizations to discuss if this structure will work for all types of multiplication connecting to both the commutative and associative properties of multiplication. The materials state, “A regular postage stamp has a length of $$\frac{3}{2}$$ inches and a width of $$\frac{3}{4}$$ inch. What is the area of the stamp in square inches?” 
  • In Lesson 26, Session 2, students use precise language (MP 6) when converting between hours and minutes, and understanding minutes as a fraction of an hour. Connect It, Problem 2 states, “Look at Picture It. You can convert minutes to hours before you multiply. What part of an hour is 40 minutes? How do you know?”

Indicator 2f

Materials carefully attend to the full meaning of each practice standard
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 5 meet expectations that the instructional materials carefully attend to the full meaning of each practice standard. Overall, the materials attend to aspects of the mathematical practices (MPs) during different lessons throughout the grade, so when taken as a whole, the instructional materials attend to the full meaning of each MP.

In i-Ready, Teach and Assess, Ready Classroom Mathematics, Program Implementation, Standards for Mathematics in Every Lesson, includes information on how the Standards for Mathematical Practice (MPs) are addressed within each lesson, noting that key components of lessons are designed to engage students with the MPs. Deepen Understanding provides guidance for teachers on each MP within lessons sessions. Discourse Questions are included, as well as prompts for Structure and Reasoning specifically related to MP7 (Look for and make use of structure) and MP8 (Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning). In addition, the Try-Discuss-Connect Instructional Routines all identify the MPs. 

The instructional materials attend to the full intent of all eight Mathematical Practices. For example:

MP 1: Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.

  • In Lesson 5 , Session 4, Refine, Try It states, “A grocery store only sells eggs by the dozen. There are 12 eggs in 1 dozen. If there are 1,248 eggs in stock, how many dozens of eggs are there?” Teacher guidance states, “Make Sense of the Problem To support students in making sense of the problem, have them discuss the meaning of in stock. Ask: How many eggs are in stock at the store? How many eggs are in a dozen? What is the problem asking you to find?”
  • In Lesson 25, Session 1, Explore, Try It states, “Lira finds an antique dresser that is 4 feet wide. She wants to know if it will fit in her room. She measures the space in inches. How many inches wide is the dresser? (1 foot = 12 inches).” Teacher guidance states, “Make Sense of the Problem. To support students in making sense of the problem, have them identify the measurement units involved, feet and inches.”

MP 2: Reason abstractly and quantitatively.

  • In Lesson 3, Session 2, Model It and Picture It state, “Gareth has a rectangular pencil cup on his desk. The cup is 3 inches long, 2 inches wide, and 5 inches high. What is the volume of the pencil cup?” Deepen Understanding states, “Associative Property, SMP2 Reason abstractly and quantitatively. When discussing the volume formula V = l x w x h, prompt students to consider using volume to represent the associative property of multiplication.Ask, ‘How does each order for multiplying show a different way of thinking of the unit cube model as equal layers of cubes?’ Listen for: (3 x 2) x 5 = 6 x 5 shows thinking of the model as 5 layers of 6 cubes, and 3 x (2 x 5) = 3 x 10 shows thinking of it as 3 layers of 10 cubes.” 
  • In Lesson 27, Session 3, Model It states, “The line plot shows the length of songs on Ron’s playlist. (Song lengths range from $$2\frac{1}{2}$$ minutes to $$4\frac{1}{2}$$ minutes) Ron adds two new songs to his playlist. His playlist is not 34 minutes in length. What are the possible lengths for the two new songs?” Deepen Understanding, Equation Models, SMP2 Reason abstractly and quantitatively states, “Discuss that the equations in Model It represent relationships among quantities in the problem and that the equations use letters for unknown quantities. Have students brainstorm questions that can be answered using data from Ron’s line plot. Ask students to decide which questions they can model with equations. Have students use letters to represent the unknowns.”

MP 4: Model with mathematics. 

  • In Lesson 22, Session 2, Practice, Problem 5 states, “Write a word problem that can be solved by finding the product $$\frac{1}{6}$$ x $$\frac{3}{8}$$. Then solve your problem. Show your work.” 
  • In Lesson 30, Session 3, Practice, Problem 7 states, “Shana is doing a craft project using yarn and craft sticks. She has 5 green yarn pieces and 7 blue yarn pieces. She has 3 times as many craft sticks as yarn pieces. Which expression can you use to find the number of craft sticks Shana has?”

MP 5: Choose tools strategically.

  • In Student Worktext, Lesson 13, Session 1, Explore, Try It, students choose from the Math Toolkit fraction tiles, fraction circles, fraction bars, fraction models, grid paper, or number lines to solve, “Paul has $$\frac{3}{4}$$ inch long bolt. He buys a bolt that is $$\frac{1}{8}$$ inch longer and a bolt that is $$\frac{1}{8}$$ shorter than the $$\frac{3}{4}$$ inch bolt. What are the lengths of the two bolts he buys?”
  • In Student Worktext, Lesson 29, Session 3, Develop, students choose from the Math Toolkit geoboards, rubber bands, tracing paper, grid paper, and rulers to solve, “Make a tree diagram to show the hierarchy of the following shapes based on their properties: rhombus, trapezoid, polygon, square, quadrilateral, rectangle, parallelogram. Use the exclusive definition of trapezoid in your diagram: a trapezoid is a quadrilateral with exactly one pair of parallel sides. Then, classify these shapes into as many categories as possible.”

MP 6: Attend to precision.

  • In Lesson 9, Session 3, Develop states, “Tyson runs in a race at a track meet. One stopwatch shows his time as 11.25 seconds. Another stopwatch has his team as 11.245 seconds.” In Deepen Understanding, Number Line Model, MP6 Attend to precision states, “When discussing the number line models, prompt students to pay attention to precision in the rounding of the times. Ask: 11.245 is close to 11.25 on the second number line. Why do 11.25 seconds and 11.245 seconds not round to the same tenth of a second? Listen for: They round to different tenths of a second because 11.25 is exactly halfway between 11.2 and 11.3 so it rounds up, while 11.245 is closer to 11.2 than it is to 11.3, so it rounds down. Ask: What if you round each time to the nearest hundredth of a second? Would they still round to different times?”
  • In Unit 2, Math In Action, Session 1 states, “Dog Collars: Alex is organizing a pet fair. Money from the fair will be donated to the local pet shelter. Alex’s friend Bella will have a booth at the fair.” A sign with the cost for each different size Adorable Dog Collars shows: Small $10.75, Medium $12.00, and Large $13.25. Students are given the cost to make each size collar and to “Find how much Bella makes on each collar after paying for supplies. Show a way to make at least $225 by selling collars. Include at least 5 collars of each size in your plan.” Students analyze Alex’s Solution, compare actual costs to estimated costs for supplies and discuss why precision is necessary when an exact cost is needed. 

MP 7: Look for and make use of structure

  • In Lesson 3, Session 3, Develop, Try It states, “Bethany has a raised garden bed. The diagram shows its measurements. All the corners are right angles. If she fills the bed to the top with soil, how many cubic feet of soil will Bethany need?” Students “Explore different ways to understand finding the volume of a solid figure by breaking it apart into two rectangluar prisms. Guidance to Support Whole Class Discussions, Compare and connect the different representations and have students identify how they are related. How does your model represent the garden bed as a combination of rectangular prisms?”
  • In Lesson 15, Session 2, Develop states, “Padma bought 3 pounds og grapes. Each pound costs $2.75. How much money did Padma spend on grapes?” In Deepen Understanding, Partial Products Model, MP 7 Use structure states, “Ask: How do the factor pairs in the second row relate to the partial products model on the Student Worktext page?”

MP 8: Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning. 

  • In Lesson 21, Session 4, Refine, Problem 4 states, “You can compare the size of a product to the size of the factors in a multiplication equation if you know whether the factors are greater than, less than or equal to 1. Part A: Write a multiplication equation in which the product is greater than both of its factors. At least one factor should be a fraction. Draw a model to support your answer. Part B. Write a multiplication equation in which both factors are fractions and the product is less than both of its factors. Draw a model to support your answer.”
  • In Lesson 24, Session 3, Develop states, “Alex makes 2 pounds of bread dough. He splits the dough into $$\frac{1}{4}$$ pound loaves before baking them in the oven. How many loaves does he make?” In Deepen Understanding, Equivalent Fractions, SMP8 Use repeated reasoning states, “When discussing the equation method shown in the second Model It, prompt students to consider where else they use renaming as a strategy. Ask: In your own words, how do you describe the strategy shown for dividing a whole number by a unit fraction. Listen for: You rename the whole number, 2, as the fraction $$\frac{8}{4}$$ so that the dividend and the divisor describe the same parts of a whole. You can then think of dividing 8 fourths into equal groups of 1 fourth.”

Indicator 2g

Emphasis on Mathematical Reasoning: Materials support the Standards' emphasis on mathematical reasoning by:
0/0

Indicator 2g.i

Materials prompt students to construct viable arguments and analyze the arguments of others concerning key grade-level mathematics detailed in the content standards.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 5 meet expectations that the instructional materials prompt students to construct viable arguments and analyze the arguments of others concerning key grade-level mathematics. 

In i-Ready, Teach and Assess, Ready Classroom Mathematics, Classroom Resources, the Student Worktext and the Math Journal provide students with opportunities to construct arguments and critique the reasoning of others. Evidence where students have opportunities to construct viable arguments includes: 

  • In Unit 1, Math In Action, Try Another Approach, students make estimates to determine how many worms will be needed to start a worm farm to recycle kitchen scraps.  After students solve the problem, students Reflect on “Make an Argument: Why did you choose the numbers you did for your estimates?”
  • In Lesson 27, Session 4, Refine, Problem 7 states, “Jordan looks at the live plot above. He says the difference between the most common capacity and the least common capacity is $$\frac{1}{4}$$ gallon. He says he knows the difference without subtracting. Explain Jordan’s mistake. Then find the actual difference between the measurement.”

Evidence where students have opportunities to analyze the mathematical arguments of others includes:

  • In Lesson 19, the Math Center Activity, Fraction Area Models, students work with partners to solve multiplication problems by shading factors in an area model. Students “Tell how to shade it on the model. If your partner agrees, shade and label the model. Your partner reads the second factor and tells how to shade it on the model. If you agree, your partner shades and labels the model. Work separately to find the product. If you and your partner agree, write the product on the Recording sheet. If you and your partner do not agree, work together to find the correct product.”
  • In Lesson 30,  Session 2, Develop, Connect It, Problem 3 states, “Morgan says you can evaluate 6 x (32 – 8) using three steps: multiply 32 by 6, multiply 8 by 6, and subtract the two products.  Why does Morgan’s method work?”

Evidence where students constructing viable arguments and analyze the mathematical arguments of others includes:

The materials contain a “Discuss It” box throughout the lessons that provide students with discussion prompts.  Some of them engage students in constructing viable arguments and/or analyzing the reasoning of others. For example, Lesson 4, Session 3, Develop, Try It states, “Find the product 1,429 X 42”  Discuss It, “Ask your partner: Do you agree with me? Why or Why not? Tell your partner: I agree with you about…because…”

Indicator 2g.ii

Materials assist teachers in engaging students in constructing viable arguments and analyzing the arguments of others concerning key grade-level mathematics detailed in the content standards.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 5 meet expectations that the instructional materials assist teachers in engaging students to construct viable arguments and analyze the arguments of others concerning key grade-level mathematics. 

In i-Ready, Teach and Assess, Ready Classroom Mathematics, Program Implementation, Resources include Discourse Cards which present questions and sentence starters to engage students in mathematical discourse, including the construction of arguments and analysis of others reasoning. For example, “Can you convince your partner or others that your answer makes sense? What do you think about what another student said? Does your partner’s strategy make sense? How is your solution method the same as or different from another student’s method?”

In Classroom Resources, Lesson 0, Understanding the Try-Discuss-Connect Instructional Routine. The Discuss routine presents opportunities to use questions and sentence starters for students to share their thinking and critique each other’s reasoning. In addition, using Compare Strategies, students discuss how representations are the same, different, and related. For example, Lesson 0, Session 2, Discuss It, Compare Class Strategies states, “Folding chairs are set up in a school auditorium for a play. There are 16 rows of chairs. Each row has 28 chairs. How many folding chairs are there? Once students share strategies and reasoning, the teacher asks “How are they the same? How are they different? How are they connected?” These instructional routines are present in every lesson.

Evidence where the instructional materials support teachers to engage students in constructing viable arguments includes:

  • In Unit 3, Math in Action, Try Another Approach states, “G.O. and his neighbors clear a rectangular area $$8\frac{1}{2}$$ feet by $$6\frac{1}{4}$$ feet to plant shrubs. Now they have to decide how many shrubs to plant and how much water to use on the shrubs.” Reflect states, “Make an Argument: How could you justify the number of shrubs you suggested?”

Evidence where the instructional materials support teachers to engage students in analyzing the arguments of others includes:

  • In Lesson 16, Session 1, Explore, Try It states, “Martin has $0.50.  Sara has 10 times as much as Martin. Jon has one tenth as much as Martin.  Does Sara have more money than Martin? Does Jon have more money than Martin? Explain.” Support Whole Class Discussion includes prompts for teachers such as, “How do (student name)’s and (student name)’s models show the amount of money each person has?”
  • In Lesson 8, Session 2, Develop, Model It, Deepen Understanding provides teachers guidance in helping students construct arguments. It states, “When discussing the expanded forms, prompt students to justify how you can represent the same value in different ways.”

Evidence where the instructional materials support teachers to engage students in constructing arguments and critiquing the reasoning of others includes:

  • In Lesson 9, Session 3, Develop, Discuss It, Support Partner Discussion states, “Encourage students to use the Discuss It question and sentence starter on the Student Worktext page as part of their discussion. Support as needed with questions such as: What evidence do you have to defend your solution? What evidence does your partner have that allows you to agree with his or her work?”

Indicator 2g.iii

Materials explicitly attend to the specialized language of mathematics.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 5 meet expectations that materials explicitly attend to the specialized language of mathematics.

In i-Ready, Teach and Assess, Ready Classroom Mathematics, there are several resources to support teachers and students to use the specialized language of mathematics. In Program Implementation, the Academic Vocabulary Glossary identifies the vocabulary, provides a definition, and uses the word in a sample sentence organized by unit. For example, justify should be used by teachers “You must justify your answer to prove it is correct.” Encouraging educators to use precise and accurate terminology during instruction. 

In Classroom Resources, Lesson Overview, Lesson Vocabulary identifies whether there is new vocabulary or review, and key terms used in the lesson. For example in Lesson 31, Session 2, the student materials include a vocabulary box with the following: “coordinate plane a two-dimensional space formed by two perpendicular number lines called axes; ordered pair a pair of numbers (x,y), that describes the location of a point in the coordinate plane, where the x-coordinate gives the point’s horizontal distance from the origin, and the y-coordinate gives the point’s vertical distance from the origin; numerator the number above the line in a fraction that tells the number of equal parts that are being described.” 

Throughout lessons in Ready Classroom Mathematics, students are provided with Graphic organizers that assist with mathematical language to ensure students are using precise vocabulary. There are five different graphic organizers used throughout the lessons that allows students to organize learning concepts and vocabulary through definitions, illustrations, examples, etc. For example, Student Worktext, Lesson 8, Session 1 states, “Think about what you know about expanded form. Fill in each box. Use words, numbers and pictures. Show as many ideas as you can. Expanded Form: In My Own Words; My Illustrations; Example, Non-Example.”

Build Your Vocabulary is provided at the beginning of each unit to support students in learning and using precise language and terminology. For example in, Unit 3, Beginning of Unit, Build Your Vocabulary, there are review vocabulary words, “estimate, decimal, fraction and round.” The teacher’s guide provides suggestions for teachers to use with students to build math vocabulary using this page. It states, “Display, point to, and read each review word aloud. Have students repeat chorally.” The page contains a table for students to complete. Students have to compare two of the words at a time (round and estimate, fraction and decimal). They must answer “How are they similar? How are they different?” and provide an example. The teacher’s guide states, “Have students share their work in a whole class setting. If students struggle to verbalize their thinking, provide the following sentence frames as they compare and contrast round and estimate. Round and estimate are similar because they both _____. Round and estimate are different because round _____, but estimate _____.”

In the Lesson Overview, Language Objectives are included for each lesson. For example, in Lesson 7, Lesson Overview, the Language Objectives includes, “Use language of equivalent fractions to describe equivalent decimals.”

In the End of Unit, Vocabulary, Vocabulary Cards are available. The materials state, “The purpose of the vocabulary cards is to reinforce students’ understanding of the new vocabulary words in the unit as well as to provide a place for students to record any other math words and definitions that would be helpful for them in their understanding of unit concepts. Students may find it useful to draw or write examples on the vocabulary cards as they encounter the terms during the unit. you may want to make a copy of the cards and display them in a word wall in the classroom to further support students’ learning.”

Gateway Three

Usability

Meets Expectations

Criterion 3a - 3e

Use and design facilitate student learning: Materials are well designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing.
8/8
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 5 meet the expectations for being well designed and taking into account effective lesson structure and pacing. The instructional materials distinguish between problems and exercises, have exercises that are given in intentional sequences, have a variety in what students are asked to produce, and include manipulatives that are faithful representations of the mathematical objects they represent.

Indicator 3a

The underlying design of the materials distinguishes between problems and exercises. In essence, the difference is that in solving problems, students learn new mathematics, whereas in working exercises, students apply what they have already learned to build mastery. Each problem or exercise has a purpose.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 5 meet expectations for distinguishing between problems and exercises. 

There are several practice pages provided with each lesson. After receiving guidance from the teacher in the Try It section of each lesson, students can demonstrate their understanding in a variety of ways. Students solve problems to learn new mathematics in the Explore sessions of each lesson. These ideas are further developed in Develop sessions, where students solve problems in the Try It and Connect It sections. In the Refine session, students complete exercises where they apply their learning. For example:

  • In Grade 5, Lesson 7, Session 1, Explore, students explore powers of ten by recognizing place value patterns with whole numbers in the Try It section. In Session 2, Develop, students use these patterns with powers of ten and decimal numbers. They practice multiplication of powers of ten and decimals. In Session 3, Refine, students apply their learning in the Apply It session, where they solve word problems. 

Indicator 3b

Design of assignments is not haphazard: exercises are given in intentional sequences.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 5 meet expectations for designing assignments not being haphazard and exercises given in intentional sequences. 

The sequence of lessons in each topic is designed to move from concrete and pictorial representation toward abstract work with numbers. Each unit has a Unit Flow and Progressions Video that highlights the work of the unit and how it fits in the progression of mathematics across grade levels. 

Each unit also has a Learning Progression Chart that shows which lessons are building upon and which lessons students are preparing for within the unit. Each lesson has learning progression information which highlights work done in previous grade levels, as well as the work to be done in this lesson and subsequent lessons.

Each lesson has a consistent structure that builds towards independence. For example,

  • In Grade 5, Lesson 13, Session 1, Explore, the teacher is prompted to help students make sense of the problem, “Paul has a $$\frac{3}{4}$$ inch long bolt. He buys a bolt that is $$\frac{1}{8}$$ inch longer and a bolt that is ⅛ inch shorter than the $$\frac{3}{4}$$ inch bolt. What are the lengths of the two bolts he buys?” The teacher is then prompted to support partner discussion by looking for and prompting use of a common denominator and how same sized parts in addition can be used in subtraction. Finally, during Apply It and the Exit Ticket students practice and independently show their understanding.

Lessons within units build upon each other. For example: 

  • In Grade 5, Unit 4 includes the following lessons and topics: Lesson 25: Convert Measurement Units, Lesson 26: Solve Word Problems Involving Conversions, Lesson 27: Make Line Plots and Interpret Data, Lesson 28: Understand Categories of Two Dimensional Figures, and Lesson 29: Classify Two Dimensional Figures.

 

Indicator 3c

There is variety in what students are asked to produce. For example, students are asked to produce answers and solutions, but also, in a grade-appropriate way, arguments and explanations, diagrams, mathematical models, etc.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 5 meet expectations for having a variety in what students are asked to produce. 

Students are expected to respond to problems in a variety of ways, including produce answers, use models, drawings, and equations to support their explanations. Students are asked to justify their solutions with a partner and participate in discussions with Discuss It and Pair/Share prompts. Students respond to different problem types in the Refine section of the lessons, including short answer explanations, multiple choice, fill in the blank, and drawings. For example:

  • In Grade 5, Lesson 15, Session 3, Develop, students respond to problems in multiple ways when multiplying decimals by whole numbers. There are problems where students provide solutions with explanations, multiple choice items, and an area model diagram.

Indicator 3d

Manipulatives are faithful representations of the mathematical objects they represent and when appropriate are connected to written methods.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 5 meet expectations for manipulatives being faithful representations of the mathematical objects they represent. 

There are a variety of manipulatives in the Math Tool Kit available during lessons, and students are introduced to these in appropriate contexts for the concept being developed.

  • In Grade 5, Lesson 2, Session 1, Explore, students use unit cubes, grid paper, dot paper and square sticky notes to find volume. 

Indicator 3e

The visual design (whether in print or online) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 5 meet the expectations for the visual design not being distracting or chaotic. 

The student pages provide ample space for students to show work and write explanations. The layout of the lessons is consistent throughout all of the lessons and the student materials are present in the teacher edition. For example:

  • In Grade 5, Lesson 29, Student Worktext, Session 3, Develop, students use tree diagrams to show the hierarchy of shape classification. Graphics are clear and do not distract from the concept. There is ample room on the page for students to draw tree diagrams when necessary.

Criterion 3f - 3l

Teacher Planning and Learning for Success with CCSS: Materials support teacher learning and understanding of the Standards.
8/8
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 5 meet the expectations for supporting teacher learning and understanding of the Standards. The instructional materials support: planning and providing learning experiences with quality questions; contain ample and useful notations and suggestions on how to present the content; and contain explanations of the grade-level mathematics in the context of the overall mathematics curriculum. 

Indicator 3f

Materials support teachers in planning and providing effective learning experiences by providing quality questions to help guide students' mathematical development.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 5 meet expectations for providing teachers with questions that are designed to elicit students’ mathematical understanding and thinking. 

  • In Grade 5, Lesson 7, Session 1, Explore, questions are posed for the teacher to ask students.  The questions are in italics and easy for the teacher to see. In Discuss It the following questions are provided: “What do you notice about the number of zeros in each product and the numbers of factors of ten? How does the value of the digit 3 in 3,000 compare to the value of the digit 3 in 30? How can you use the diagram to answer the question? What do you notice about the number of zeros in each quotient and the number of zeros in the dividend and divisor?”

Indicator 3g

Materials contain a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 5 meets expectations for including ample notes and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition. 

The Program Implementation tab includes a “Digital Math Tools - Support Videos” section. This section includes support videos for counters and connecting cubes, base ten introduction, base ten: add and subtract, number line, multiplication models, perimeter and area, fraction models: add and subtract, and fraction models: compare and multiply.

In Classroom Resources, guidance for teachers supports the delivery of the content, as well as information on student responses for each section of the lesson. For example: 

  • In Grade 5, Lesson 25, Session 3, Develop, the teacher notes include annotations that describe the Purpose, Connect to Prior Knowledge, Make Sense of the Problem, Try It, Discuss it, Model It & Solve It, Connect It, Apply It, and a Close: Exit Ticket to assist the teachers in presenting the material to the students. Moreover, in this section there is a Deepen Understanding box that focuses on MP2. 

Indicator 3h

Materials contain a teacher's edition (in print or clearly distinguished/accessible as a teacher's edition in digital materials) that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced mathematics concepts in the lessons so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 5 meet expectations for containing a teacher’s edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced mathematics concepts in the lessons so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject as necessary. 

In Classroom Resources at the beginning of each unit, Learning Progressions, Math Background, and Unit Flow and Progression Videos provide information for teachers on mathematics and models. For example:

  • In Grade 5, Unit 5, Beginning of Unit, the Unit Flow & Progression video helps teachers understand lines, rays, measures, combined angles, classifying figures and symmetry. There are visuals, common errors, and insights on each topic to deepen teachers’ knowledge of the subject. 

Indicator 3i

Materials contain a teacher's edition (in print or clearly distinguished/accessible as a teacher's edition in digital materials) that explains the role of the specific grade-level mathematics in the context of the overall mathematics curriculum for kindergarten through grade twelve.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 5 meet expectations for containing a teacher’s edition that explains the role of the specific grade-level mathematics in the context of the overall mathematics curriculum for Kindergarten through Grade 12.  

The Ready Classroom Mathematics materials include a “Learning Progression,” section in the teacher edition for each lesson that describes how the grade-level appropriate standard is developed in previous grades as well as how it will extend in the next grade. For example:

  • In Grade 5, Lesson 1, Lesson Overview, Standards 5.MD.3a & 5.MD.3b are listed and defined. Under the Learning Progression section on the same page, there is a small paragraph about “In Grade 4,” then “in this lesson,” and then, “in the next lesson.”

Indicator 3j

Materials provide a list of lessons in the teacher's edition (in print or clearly distinguished/accessible as a teacher's edition in digital materials), cross-referencing the standards covered and providing an estimated instructional time for each lesson, chapter and unit (i.e., pacing guide).
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 5 contain an online portal that cross-references standards and provides a pacing guide for each lesson. Specifically, under the Program Implementation tab there are Teacher’s Guide, Table of Contents, Program Overview, Correlations, and Yearly Pacing resources to assist the teacher. Moreover, under the correlation resource there are correlations by state standard, correlations by ready classroom mathematics lessons, math in action correlations, standards for mathematical practices correlations, unit review correlations, and ELA standard correlations.

Indicator 3k

Materials contain strategies for informing parents or caregivers about the mathematics program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 5 contain strategies for informing parents or caregivers about the mathematics program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement. Family Letters for each lesson are found in the “Lesson Overview and Family Letter” tab at the beginning of each lesson. These letters explain the learning target and include an activity they can do at home. In the teacher edition, there is a “Connect to Family” section. For example:

  • In Grade 5, Lesson 31, the Family Letter provides parents with information about coordinate planes and an activity for families to do with their child. 

Indicator 3l

Materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 5 contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies. Under the Program Implementation Tab, there is a Supporting Research tab. Here, teachers can find supporting research charts including: “Ready Classroom Mathematics is built on research from a variety of federal initiatives, national mathematics organizations, and experts in mathematics.” The chart lists instructional routines, mathematical practices, collaborative learning, and mathematical discourse. For each one of those items, the publishers have listed examples and corresponding research.

Criterion 3m - 3q

Assessment: Materials offer teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards.
10/10
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 5 meet expectations for offering teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards. The instructional materials provide opportunities for addressing common student errors and misconceptions, ongoing review and practice with feedback, clearly denote the standards being assessed, and provide rubrics and guidance for teachers to interpret student performance and suggestions for follow-up. The instructional materials also provide opportunities to gather information on students’ prior knowledge.

Indicator 3m

Materials provide strategies for gathering information about students' prior knowledge within and across grade levels.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 5 meet expectations for providing strategies for gathering information about students’ prior knowledge within and across grade levels. 

The materials in Ready Classroom Mathematics list prerequisite skills for each lesson in the Lesson overview. Prerequisite Lessons are provided with each lesson to review concepts or to provide students with instruction in areas that may be gaps in their learning. For example:

  • In Grade 5, Lesson 4, the Prerequisite Lessons are: Grade 4 Lesson 11, Sessions 1-4, and Lesson 12, Sessions 1-3.

In addition to identifying prerequisite skills for each lesson, Explore, at the beginning of each lesson, connects students’ prior knowledge with the content of the lesson. In some Warm-up questions there is a tag “Prerequisite” noting that the question is assessing prior knowledge.  

The instructional materials include adaptive Diagnostic Assessments with Prerequisite  Reports found in i-Ready, Reports.

Indicator 3n

Materials provide strategies for teachers to identify and address common student errors and misconceptions.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 5 meet expectations for providing strategies for teachers to identify and address common student errors and misconceptions. 

The Ready Classroom Mathematics materials provide strategies for teachers to identify and address common student errors and misconceptions. For example,

  • In Grade 5, Lesson 27, Session 1, Explore, the Common Misconception states, “Look for students who are not comfortable with identifying the values for the unlabeled tick marks.  As students present solutions, have them specify how they determined the value for the lightest tomato.”

Indicator 3o

Materials provide opportunities for ongoing review and practice, with feedback, for students in learning both concepts and skills.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 5 meet expectations for providing opportunities for ongoing review and practice, with feedback, for students in learning both concepts and skills. 

Over the course of a lesson, which includes multiple sessions, materials engage students with multiple activities to review, practice, and independently demonstrate the grade-level mathematical concepts and skills. 

Feedback is provided to students as they progress through the Sessions. Frequent feedback opportunities to address skills and concepts are provided in the Classroom Resources tab, within each lesson and its sessions. The Reteach - Tools for Instruction within each lesson provides teachers with sample errors and remediation strategies to address those errors. In addition, throughout the lesson sessions, potential misconceptions are highlighted with guidance for teachers to provide feedback and new opportunities for practice. For example:

  • In Grade 5, Lesson 16, Reteach Tools for Instruction, Multiply Decimals, Check for Understanding states, “If you observe the student uses a correct model but finds the incorrect product, the student may not understand the difference between tenths and hundredths.  Then try reviewing models of tenths and hundredths using 10 by 10 grids.” 

Indicator 3p

Materials offer ongoing formative and summative assessments:
0/0

Indicator 3p.i

Assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 5 meet expectations for offering ongoing formative and summative assessments that clearly denote which standard is being emphasized.

  • Standards are clearly noted within the assessments found at the end of each lesson. Standards are provided alongside the questions as well as the Depth of Knowledge level. Unit Assessment Correlations are available with the question number, DOK, Standard, and Lesson. 
  • A Mid-Unit Assessment is provided for longer units. Mid-Unit Assessments also provide standards correlations for each item. These can be found in the Classroom Resources tab, End of Unit, Assess, Lesson Quizzes, and Unit Assessments. 
  • Formative assessments are also available:
    • Lesson quizzes, exit tickets, and quick checks are provided for most lessons. These quizzes assess the specific standard(s) being taught in the lesson.
    • Within the sessions are Check For Understanding supports that include a statement as to why the check is being done. The why relates back to the standard being taught in the activities for that session.

Indicator 3p.ii

Assessments include aligned rubrics and scoring guidelines that provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 5 meet expectations for including aligned rubrics and scoring guidelines to support teachers in interpreting student performance and sometimes provide for follow-up instruction. 

Rubrics are provided for Mid-Unit Assessments, Unit Assessments, Unit Performance Tasks, Lesson Quizzes, and Math in Action. (grade 2 and above) The rubrics and scoring guidelines support teachers to interpret student performance. Assessment answer keys are provided alongside the questions along with the DOK level for the item. For multiple choice answers, the correct answer and explanations for incorrect choices are given, including the most common misconceptions.  

Reports from i-Ready diagnostic assessments and comprehension checks assist teachers in providing follow-up instruction for misconceptions and mathematical errors. The electronic reports also include links to assist in reteaching items missed. Within lessons, rubrics and scoring guidelines provide guidance for teachers to follow-up and, throughout Ready Classroom Mathematics, there is guidance for teachers on behaviors to look for, error alerts, and Common Misconceptions. 

  • Unit Assessments include a Unit Assessment Teacher Guide that provides instructors with solutions, points possible, the exact standard covered, and the depth of knowledge (DOK) level for each item.
  • The Scoring Guide for the problems in the scoring table include: DOK, points of scoring, standard addressed, and lesson assessed by each problem.
  • The Scoring Rubrics includes points and expectations for short response, multiple select, choice matrix, extended response, and fill-in-the-blank items.
  • Assessment Practice provides some support for follow-up by identifying standards that need further study and reinforcement. Assessment Practice Answer Key and Correlations identify the standard which each question has been designed to evaluate. 

Indicator 3q

Materials encourage students to monitor their own progress.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 5 encourage students to monitor their own progress. 

Each Unit Opener has a Self-Check page for students to select the skills/concepts they think they already know and understand. End of Unit opportunities for self-reflection are provided at each grade level for all units. Assessments can be completed using an answer form that allows for students to correct the assessment orally after completion, review answers, and explain concepts students may not fully understand. Dialogue is fully supported inside the classroom to address student misconceptions and give students opportunities for both self- and peer assessment.

Criterion 3r - 3y

Differentiated instruction: Materials support teachers in differentiating instruction for diverse learners within and across grades.
12/12
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 5 meet the expectations for supporting teachers in differentiating instruction for diverse learners within and across grades. The instructional materials consistently provide: strategies to help teachers sequence and scaffold lessons; to meet the needs of a range of learners; tasks with multiple entry points; supports and accommodations for English Language Learners and special populations; and opportunities for advanced students to investigate mathematics content at a deeper level. The instructional materials provide a balanced portrayal of various demographic and personal characteristics, and include suggestions for grouping strategies.

Indicator 3r

Materials provide strategies to help teachers sequence or scaffold lessons so that the content is accessible to all learners.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 5 meet expectations for providing strategies to help teachers sequence or scaffold lessons so that the content is accessible to all learners. 

The sessions within a lesson follow the sequence of Explore, Develop, and Refine. Within a session, there is a sequence of Start, followed by Try It, Model It, or Apply It; Discuss; Connect; and Close.

  • Start is designed to build fluency or connect to prior knowledge. 
  • Try It is designed to give students an opportunity to explore the concept on their own.
  • Model It is designed to allow students the opportunity to explore the concept through manipulatives or drawings. 
  • Apply It is designed to give students an opportunity to practice the skill on their own. 
  • Discuss is designed to allow students to talk to other students about the concept and compare what they did with each other. 
  • Connect It is designed to help students connect the concept to real-life. 
  • Close is designed to solidify the learning for the day and to check for understanding through the use of an exit ticket. 

Each lesson includes a Differentiated Instruction Teacher Toolbox that includes Reteach (Tools for Instruction), Reinforce (Math Center Activities), and Extend (Enrichment Activities). For example, the Lesson 1 Overview states: 

  • Reteach- “Children who require additional support for prerequisite or on-level skills will benefit from activities that provide targeted skills instruction.”
  • Reinforce- “Children who require additional practice to reinforce concepts and skills and deepen understanding will benefit from small group collaborative games and activities.” This is available in three versions: on-level, below-level, and above-level.
  • Extend- “Children who have achieved proficiency with concepts and skills are ready for additional challenges will benefit from group collaborative games and activities to extend understanding.”

Indicator 3s

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 5 meet expectations for providing teachers with strategies to meet the needs of a range of learners. 

Each lesson provides opportunity for differentiation in small group lessons, interactive digital tutorials, support for teachers to address common misconceptions at different points throughout lessons. For example:

  • The Differentiated Instruction opportunities provide support to reteach students who need additional support, reinforce learning for students who need additional practice, and extend learning for students who have achieved proficiency and are ready for further challenges.
  • The Language Development sections for English Language Learners provides even more differentiated support for students who are at different levels of English proficiency.
  • Community and Cultural Responsiveness activities build bridges between the mathematics students are learning to investigations of authentic contexts and issues. For example, students apply mathematics they have learned to objects and activities found in parks.

The materials also support learning with a variety of different experiences to develop connections in each lesson. For example:

  • Lessons use manipulative objects such as counters and connecting cubes for hands-on experiences where students are actively applying and representing mathematics with hands-on objects.
  • Partner and Whole group discussion are incorporated in all sessions to provide dialogue surrounding the mathematics being done.
  • Visual representations and physical representations using mathematics manipulatives are used throughout each session.

Indicator 3t

Materials embed tasks with multiple entry-points that can be solved using a variety of solution strategies or representations.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 5 meet expectations for embedding tasks with multiple entry points that can be solved using a variety of solution strategies or representations. 

The materials present word problems at the beginning of most lessons in the Try It part of the session, which provides multiple points of entry for students. During Model It, students can model the problem in whichever way they like. Examples of problems that provide multiple entry points, different representations, and/or solution pathways include:

  • In Grade 5, Lesson 11, Session 1, Explore, Try It states, “The mass of a female hummingbird is 4.5 grams. The mass of a male hummingbird is 3.2 grams. What is the difference between the masses of the female and male hummingbirds?” 

Indicator 3u

Materials suggest support, accommodations, and modifications for English Language Learners and other special populations that will support their regular and active participation in learning mathematics (e.g., modifying vocabulary words within word problems).
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 5 meet expectations for suggesting support, accommodations, and modifications for English Language Learners and other special populations to engage students in regular and active participation in learning mathematics.

In Program Implementation, Implementation Support there are resources, including:

  • A Multilingual Glossary
  • A Bilingual Glossary
  • An Academic Vocabulary Glossary
  • WIDA PRIME V2 Correlation
  • Try-Discuss-Connect Routine Resources

In Classroom Resources, Teachers Edition, Language Development is identified for each lesson. This differentiated instruction chart provides guidance for teachers at three levels of differentiation that identifies specific strategies (e.g., Speaking/Writing, Reading/Writing) directly connected to lesson sessions and activities. During sessions, specific strategies target additional supports for students to support engagement in lesson activities. For example:

  • Prerequisite lessons are identified for most lessons and include specific supports for ELLs.
  • Develop Language includes Why (rationale for the suggestions) and How (strategies and guidance on how to engage students) sections, along with explanations as needed.  
  • Discuss It provides supports for all students to engage in mathematical discourse.
  • Differentiated Instruction is included for most lessons and includes activities for intervention, on-level, and challenge.
  • Math Center activities provide multiple levels of content. 
  • Math in Action lessons in Grade 2 and higher build background in a variety of contexts to ensure access for all.

Indicator 3v

Materials provide opportunities for advanced students to investigate mathematics content at greater depth.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 5 meet expectations for providing opportunities for proficient and advanced students to participate in enrichment activities for a deeper challenge. 

In i-Ready, Teach and Assess, Ready Classroom Mathematics, Classroom Resources, Teacher, Lesson Pacing Guide includes Small Group Differentiation Activities, and highlights Extend, Enrichment Activity. These Enrichment Activities can be found during the Refine session in the lesson, and include a Challenge Activity related to the content of the lesson. For example: 

  • In Grade 5, Lesson 5, Extend states, “Have students write division word problems using a three- or four-digit number for the dividend and a two-digit number for the divisor…”

Indicator 3w

Materials provide a balanced portrayal of various demographic and personal characteristics.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 5 meet expectations for providing a balanced portrayal of demographic and personal characteristics representing a variety of backgrounds. 

In the Program Implementation tab, a multilingual, bilingual, and academic glossary are provided. Throughout the materials there are examples of animated pictures of children that have varied skin tone, features, hair color, and hair types such as pictures of children with brown skin and black hair, light skin and blond hair, and brown skin and brown hair. Pictures with more than one child show interactions between children with varied skin and hair colors such as one with light brown skin and black hair and the other with dark brown skin and black hair. The pictures of objects included are pencils, cars, soccer balls, footballs, apples, bananas, crayons, goldfish, rocks, flowers and other objects commonly known to most students. A variety of names representing different ethnic and cultural backgrounds are used, including:  Rosa and Ryan, Nick and Nora, Dave and Ari, Roberto and Rena, Fran and Pete, Gabe and Rose, Darious, Sam, Lexi, Paco, Julija, Lana, and Kyle.

Indicator 3x

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 5 provide a variety of opportunities for different grouping strategies. 

Each lesson session includes supports for partner discussion and whole class discussion. Some examples of discussions throughout the materials include: “Have pairs explain how they modeled and solved the problems. Compare and Connect the different representations and have children identify how they are related. Ask your partner: Do you agree with me? Why or why not? Tell your partner: I started by…” These discussion starters are used throughout the materials in all grades. Opportunities for grouping are also supported in the differentiated instruction and language development activities. The teacher materials offer support for whole class discussions and independent activities throughout the instruction.

Indicator 3y

Materials encourage teachers to draw upon home language and culture to facilitate learning.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 5 provide support to draw upon home language and culture to facilitate learning. The materials offer a multilingual mathematics glossary that defines common mathematical terms in ten different languages. There are student discourse tools in both English and Spanish to support those two most common languages. There are family letters in Spanish, as well as in English, that support parents in learning mathematics at home. 

Interactive Learning Games are available in English and Spanish.

Criterion 3z - 3ad

Effective technology use: Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. Digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms.
0/0
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 5 integrate technology in ways that engage students in the Mathematical Practices. The digital materials are web-based and compatible with multiple internet browsers, and include opportunities to assess students’ mathematical knowledge and procedural skill. The digital materials do not include opportunities to personalize learning for students, but do present some opportunities for customization for local use. The instructional materials do not include opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other.  

Indicator 3z

Materials integrate technology such as interactive tools, virtual manipulatives/objects, and/or dynamic mathematics software in ways that engage students in the Mathematical Practices.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 5 integrate technology such as interactive tools, virtual manipulatives/objects, and/or dynamic mathematics software in ways that engage students in the Mathematical Practices. 

The materials include Interactive Tutorials with most lessons that are animated interactive lessons assigned to students in their personalized instructional plan. These tutorials include integrative technology such as interactive tools and digital math manipulatives to engage students in the Mathematical Practices.  

Some lessons include multiple interactive tutorials related to the content of the lesson. Students work through the videos and answer questions. Students can use the lesson view to skip to different parts of the lesson. There is a pen for student use, as well as a notepad and a dictionary.

Digital Math Tools are provided to be used throughout the program. Tools available in the grades K-5 program include Counters, Connecting Cubes, Base Ten Blocks Tool, Number Line Tool, Multiplication Models Tool, Perimeter and Area Tool, and Fraction Models Tool. In general, tools are representative of concrete manipulatives.

Seven learning games are provided for student practice of concepts and skills. There is a document called “Learning Games Lessons Correlations” in the Program Implementation Guide, in the Digital Resource Correlations section, that provides information for teachers about which games support which lesson content. 

Interactive Practice is provided for student practice of concepts. The practice is provided for some lessons but not all. In each Interactive Practice, students are given problems to solve which build on their conceptual understanding and help consolidate their knowledge.

Indicator 3aa

Digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based and compatible with multiple internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.). In addition, materials are "platform neutral" (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform) and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed  for Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 5 digital materials are web-based and compatible with multiple Internet browsers and operating systems. These materials also allow for the use of handheld and mobile devices. System requirements can be accessed by clicking the question mark at the top right-hand corner when signed in to the teacher website and clicking on the link to the system requirements PDF. 

According to the PDF provided by the publisher, the materials are compatible with Windows 7 SP!, Windows 10 1802 (April 2018 update) or higher, MacOS X 10.11, MacOS 10.12-10.14, Google Chrome OS. Supported browsers include Internet Explorer on Mac and Google Chrome operating systems, Microsoft Edge, Microsoft Safari, Firefox, and Google Chrome. The publisher recommends Google Chrome with auto-updates enabled for the best experience. In addition, there is an app for iPads titled “i-Ready for Students.” The app is not supported for iPad minis. The app is not available for other tablets or the iPhone. However, when attempted, many of the tools can be viewed on other mobile devices through the website accessed through the browsers listed.

Indicator 3ab

Materials include opportunities to assess student mathematical understandings and knowledge of procedural skills using technology.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 5 materials include online comprehension checks for each lesson. Comprehension checks have five problems and are a mixture of problem types, including multiple-choice, multiple select, fill in the blank, and drag and drop. Middle and End of Unit Assessments are also available for each unit in a digital version with similar formatting. Those assessments are customizable and allow teachers to eliminate or combine assessment items. The learning games offer teachers reports on three types of data that include time spent on activities, student performance on math skills, and other qualitative data such as student perseverance through difficult tasks. Reports for comprehension checks are available for individual students and at the class level. 

Indicator 3ac

Materials can be easily customized for individual learners. i. Digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations. ii. Materials can be easily customized for local use. For example, materials may provide a range of lessons to draw from on a topic.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 5 can be customized for individual learners or users through the digital platform using adaptive or innovative technologies. 

In i-Ready, Assess and Teach, Assessment, teachers can customize Interactive Practice assignments. In i-Ready, Reports, Learning Games can also be customized. i-Ready Instruction, available for an additional purchase, includes additional opportunities to customize content. In i-Ready, Assess and Teach, Classroom Resources, Lesson Quizzes, Fluency and Skills activities, and powerpoint slides for each lesson are customizable.

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 5 materials provide limited opportunities for teachers to customize lessons for local use. Ready Classroom Mathematics Teacher Resources include Small Group Differentiation using Prerequisite Lessons, Tools for Instruction, Math Center Activities, and Enrichment Activities. These are teacher-led activities for use with small groups requiring additional instruction and/or review prerequisite concepts. Middle and End of Unit Assessments have one editable form, digital assessments are customizable, and fluency pages have an editable form as well. 

Indicator 3ad

Materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.).
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 5 provide no explicit guidance for opportunities for collaboration using technology. No opportunities are provided for teacher-to-student collaboration or student-to-student collaboration. There are no technical features that allow collaboration between teacher and student or between students.

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Additional Publication Details

Report Published Date: 04/02/2020

Report Edition: 2020

Ready Classroom Mathematics Student Worktext Grade 5

Title ISBN Edition Publisher Year
Ready Classroom Mathematics Teacher Guide Grade 5 978-1-4957-9710-1 Curriculum Associates 2020

About Publishers Responses

All publishers are invited to provide an orientation to the educator-led team that will be reviewing their materials. The review teams also can ask publishers clarifying questions about their programs throughout the review process.

Once a review is complete, publishers have the opportunity to post a 1,500-word response to the educator report and a 1,500-word document that includes any background information or research on the instructional materials.

About Technology Information

EdReports requested that publishers fill out The Instructional Materials Technology Information document about each of their products that met our alignment criteria. This document does not evaluate the quality or desirability of any product functionality, but documents features in order to empower local schools and districts with information to select materials that will work best for them given their technological capabilities and instructional vision.

Please note: Beginning in spring 2020, reports developed by EdReports.org will be using an updated version of our review tools. View draft versions of our revised review criteria here.

Educator-Led Review Teams

Each report found on EdReports.org represents hundreds of hours of work by educator reviewers. Working in teams of 4-5, reviewers use educator-developed review tools, evidence guides, and key documents to thoroughly examine their sets of materials.

After receiving over 25 hours of training on the EdReports.org review tool and process, teams meet weekly over the course of several months to share evidence, come to consensus on scoring, and write the evidence that ultimately is shared on the website.

All team members look at every grade and indicator, ensuring that the entire team considers the program in full. The team lead and calibrator also meet in cross-team PLCs to ensure that the tool is being applied consistently among review teams. Final reports are the result of multiple educators analyzing every page, calibrating all findings, and reaching a unified conclusion.

Rubric Design

The EdReports.org’s rubric supports a sequential review process through three gateways. These gateways reflect the importance of standards alignment to the fundamental design elements of the materials and considers other attributes of high-quality curriculum as recommended by educators.

Advancing Through Gateways

  • Materials must meet or partially meet expectations for the first set of indicators to move along the process. Gateways 1 and 2 focus on questions of alignment. Are the instructional materials aligned to the standards? Are all standards present and treated with appropriate depth and quality required to support student learning?
  • Gateway 3 focuses on the question of usability. Are the instructional materials user-friendly for students and educators? Materials must be well designed to facilitate student learning and enhance a teacher’s ability to differentiate and build knowledge within the classroom. In order to be reviewed and attain a rating for usability (Gateway 3), the instructional materials must first meet expectations for alignment (Gateways 1 and 2).

Key Terms Used throughout Review Rubric and Reports

  • Indicator Specific item that reviewers look for in materials.
  • Criterion Combination of all of the individual indicators for a single focus area.
  • Gateway Organizing feature of the evaluation rubric that combines criteria and prioritizes order for sequential review.
  • Alignment Rating Degree to which materials meet expectations for alignment, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.
  • Usability Degree to which materials are consistent with effective practices for use and design, teacher planning and learning, assessment, and differentiated instruction.

Math K-8 Rubric and Evidence Guides

The K-8 review rubric identifies the criteria and indicators for high quality instructional materials. The rubric supports a sequential review process that reflect the importance of alignment to the standards then consider other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

For math, our rubrics evaluate materials based on:

  • Focus and Coherence

  • Rigor and Mathematical Practices

  • Instructional Supports and Usability

The K-8 Evidence Guides complement the rubric by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

The EdReports rubric supports a sequential review process through three gateways. These gateways reflect the importance of alignment to college and career ready standards and considers other attributes of high-quality curriculum, such as usability and design, as recommended by educators.

Materials must meet or partially meet expectations for the first set of indicators (gateway 1) to move to the other gateways. 

Gateways 1 and 2 focus on questions of alignment to the standards. Are the instructional materials aligned to the standards? Are all standards present and treated with appropriate depth and quality required to support student learning?

Gateway 3 focuses on the question of usability. Are the instructional materials user-friendly for students and educators? Materials must be well designed to facilitate student learning and enhance a teacher’s ability to differentiate and build knowledge within the classroom. 

In order to be reviewed and attain a rating for usability (Gateway 3), the instructional materials must first meet expectations for alignment (Gateways 1 and 2).

Alignment and usability ratings are assigned based on how materials score on a series of criteria and indicators with reviewers providing supporting evidence to determine and substantiate each point awarded.

For ELA and math, alignment ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for alignment to college- and career-ready standards, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.

For science, alignment ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for alignment to the Next Generation Science Standards, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.

For all content areas, usability ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for effective practices (as outlined in the evaluation tool) for use and design, teacher planning and learning, assessment, differentiated instruction, and effective technology use.

Math K-8

Math High School

ELA K-2

ELA 3-5

ELA 6-8


ELA High School

Science Middle School

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